Massachusetts gubernatorial election, 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Massachusetts gubernatorial election, 2010
Massachusetts
2006 ←
November 2, 2010 → 2014

  Deval 2.jpg Charlie Baker cropped.jpg Timothy Cahill.jpg
Nominee Deval Patrick Charlie Baker Tim Cahill
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Running mate Tim Murray Richard R. Tisei Paul Loscocco[1]
Popular vote 1,108,404 962,848 183,933
Percentage 48.4% 42.0% 8.0%

2010 MA Governor.jpg

Results by municipality

Governor before election

Deval Patrick
Democratic

Elected Governor

Deval Patrick
Democratic

The Massachusetts gubernatorial election of 2010 was held on November 2, 2010. Incumbent Democratic Governor Deval Patrick was re-elected to a second term.[2] Also competing were the Republican Party nominee, businessman Charlie Baker; independent candidate and State Treasurer Tim Cahill; and Green-Rainbow Party nominee and physician Jill Stein. Party primaries were held on September 14, though all four candidates ran unopposed in their respective primaries.[3] Tim Murray, who ran on a ticket with Patrick, was re-elected Lieutenant Governor.

Candidates[edit]

Democrats[edit]

Republicans[edit]

Green-Rainbow Party[edit]

  • Jill Stein, physician and co-chairperson of the Green-Rainbow Party, declared her candidacy on January 7, 2010.[8] Her running mate was Richard P. Purcell, a surgery clerk and ergonomics assessor, of Holyoke.[9]

Independents[edit]

  • Tim Cahill, State Treasurer and Receiver-General.[10] Cahill had won the 2006 treasurer's election as a Democrat, but changed his party to "unenrolled" (equivalent to "independent" in Massachusetts) so he could challenge Patrick in this election. Paul Loscocco, a former Republican State Representative, was his running mate.

Republican nomination[edit]

Ahead of the April 2010 Republican party convention, many delegates preferred Harvard Pilgrim CEO Charlie Baker to be the Republican nominee,[11] however, there was support for State Senator Bob Hedlund,[12] former State Treasurer Joseph D. Malone[13] (who declined to instead run for Congress), and former Lieutenant Governor Kerry Healey.[14] In early 2009, two "draft" websites appeared encouraging Baker[15] and U.S. Attorney Michael Sullivan[16][17] to run for governor. Christy Mihos announced his bid for governor on April 25, 2009 as a Republican; in 2006 he ran as an independent. Baker announced his candidacy on July 8, 2009, and went on to win the nomination at the state Republican Party convention, freeing him of a primary challenge from Christy Mihos, with 89 percent of the vote.[18] Richard R. Tisei was Baker's running mate.

Democratic nomination[edit]

Incumbent governor Deval Patrick was opposed for the Democratic nomination by Grace Ross, the 2006 Green-Rainbow nominee for Governor.[5]

On June 1, 2010, Ross withdrew from the race when she could not garner the amount of signatures needed to run,[19] leaving Patrick as the only candidate in the primary race going into the June 5 Democratic State Convention. Incumbent Lieutenant Governor Tim Murray was again his running mate.

General election[edit]

Defection of Loscocco[edit]

On October 1, 2010, Loscocco announced that he would withdraw from the race and endorse Republican candidate Charlie Baker.[1] Loscocco formally remained on the ballot, however.[20] On October 7, Cahill filed a lawsuit against four former campaign aides, alleging that they conspired to undermine his candidacy and help Charlie Baker by arranging his defection.[21] Cahill claimed that e-mails between Republican political consultants and Loscocco's top aide suggested that Loscocco may have been enticed to leave the ticket by future job promises.[22] In response, Loscocco claimed that Cahill's top aide was coordinating strategy with the Patrick campaign and the Democratic Governors' Association and thus was never actually an independent effort.[23]

Lottery ad[edit]

Soon after Cahill filed suit against him, Adam Meldrum, Cahill's former campaign manager, alleged that Cahill colluded with the Massachusetts Lottery, which is overseen by the state treasurer's office, to run an ad favorable to him during the campaign. The ad, paid for by the Commonwealth, described the Massachusetts Lottery "the most successful state lottery America" and "consistently well-managed", echoing themes from Cahill's gubernatorial campaign. Both Cahill and Massachusetts Lottery Director Mark Cavanagh denied the allegations.[21] On October 18, e-mails released in conjunction with Cahill's lawsuit appeared to reveal that the campaign attempted to have the Lottery air a series of ads that praised the lottery's management. In the e-mails, Cahill's campaign media strategist Dane Strother told Meldrum to "Get the Lottery immediately cutting a spot and get it up...Needs to focus on the Lottery being the best in the country and above reproach." Two days later, Cahill's senior adviser Scott Campbell wrote, "I think the first thing is to figure out what/where/how we want to do this ... with Lottery people."[24]

On April 2, 2012, Cahill was indicted by a Grand Jury on charges that he used $1.65 million in Massachusetts State Lottery advertising to aid his campaign for governor.[25] On December 12, 2012, a mistrial was declared in the corruption case after the jury failed to reach a verdict on two counts of conspiracy.[26]

Polling[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Deval Patrick Grace Ross
Suffolk University February 21–24, 2010 59% 15%

Republican primary[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Charlie Baker Christy Mihos
The Boston Globe/UNH July 15–21, 2009 27% 20%
Suffolk University November 4–8, 2009 30% 33%
Suffolk University February 21–24, 2010 47% 17%

General election[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Democratic
nominee
Republican
nominee
Green-Rainbow
nominee
Independent
nominee
Deval Patrick Grace Ross Charlie Baker Christy Mihos Jill Stein Tim Cahill
Rasmussen Reports June 24, 2009 41% –– 36% –– –– ––
40% –– –– 41% –– ––

The Boston Globe/UNH

July 15–21, 2009 35% –– 41% –– –– ––
30% –– 20% –– –– 30%
40% –– –– 41% –– ––
31% –– –– 18% –– 31%
Rasmussen Reports August 20, 2009 35% –– –– 40% –– ––
Rasmussen Reports October 22, 2009 34% –– 24% –– –– 23%
34% –– –– 23% –– 23%
Suffolk University November 4–8, 2009 38% –– 15% –– –– 26%
36% –– –– 20% –– 26%
Rasmussen Reports November 23, 2009 33% –– 28% –– –– 25%
32% –– –– 26% –– 28%
The Boston Globe/UNH January 2–6, 2010 30% –– 19% –– –– 23%
32% –– –– 19% –– 23%
Public Policy Polling January 7–9, 2010 29% –– 27% –– –– 21%
28% –– –– 21% –– 25%
Suffolk University February 21–24, 2010 33% –– 25% –– 3% 23%
34% –– –– 19% 3% 26%
Rasmussen Reports March 8, 2010 35% –– 32% –– –– 19%
34% –– –– 19% –– 30%
Rasmussen Reports April 5, 2010 35% –– 27% –– –– 23%
38% –– –– 15% –– 33%
Rasmussen Reports May 10, 2010 45% –– 31% –– –– 14%
–– 27% 32% –– 16%
Suffolk University May 25, 2010 42% –– 29% 8% 14%
Rasmussen Reports June 21, 2010 41% 34% –– 16%
The Boston Globe/UNH June 17–23, 2010 38% 31% 2% 9%
Rasmussen Reports July 22, 2010 38% 32% –– 17%
Statehouse News August 29–31, 2010 34% 28% 4% 18%
Rasmussen Reports September 1, 2010 39% 34% –– 18%
Rasmussen Reports September 17, 2010 45% 42% –– 5%
Suffolk University / 7 News September 16–19, 2010 41% 34% 4% 14%
The Boston Globe/UNH September 17–22, 2010 35% 34% 4% 11%
Western New England College September 19–23, 2010 39% 33% 3% 16%
Rasmussen Reports September 30, 2010 47% 42% 6%
Suffolk University 7 News October 10–12, 2010 46% 39% 1% 10%
Public Opinion Strategies October 11–13, 2010 35% 42% 2% 10%
Rasmussen Reports October 18, 2010 47% 42% 6%
Western New England College October 22, 2010 44% 36% 5% 8%
Boston Globe October 24, 2010 43% 39% 2% 8%
Suffolk University/7News October 25–27, 2010 46% 39% 2% 9%
Rasmussen Reports October 27, 2010 46% 44% 6%
Western New England College October 24–28, 2010 42% 37% 3% 11%
Results (for comparison) [November 2, 2010] [ 48.4% ] [ 42.0% ] [ 1.4% ] [ 8.0% ]

Fundraising[edit]

As of October 31, 2010.[27] Shading indicates candidate with the highest amount.

Candidate (Party) Raised Spent Balance
Tim Cahill (I) $570,345.01 $277,655.73 $292,689.28
Charlie Baker (R) $736,877.30 $491,089.99 $245,787.31
Deval Patrick (D) $606,991.19 $459,858.16 $147,133.03
Jill Stein (G) $64,454.75 $22,068.50 $42,386.25

Results[edit]

Massachusetts gubernatorial election, 2010[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Deval Patrick / Tim Murray 1,112,283 48.42 –7.21
Republican Charlie Baker / Richard R. Tisei 964,866 42.00 +6.67
Independent Tim Cahill / Paul Loscocco 184,395 8.03 +1.06
Green-Rainbow Jill Stein / Richard P. Purcell 32,895 1.43 –0.51
Write-in All others 2,600 0.11 –0.01
Total votes 2,297,039
  Blank 22,924
Turnout 2,319,963
Majority 147,417 6.41
Democratic hold Swing –13.88

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Loscocco declared he would drop out and endorse the Republican ticket. However, there was no way to drop out by that time, so he remained on the ballot.Bierman, Noah; Levenson, Michael; Ellement, John R. (October 1, 2010). "'I won't give in,' Cahill declares as he vows to stay in race". The Boston Globe. Retrieved October 5, 2010. 
  2. ^ Phillips, Frank; Levenson, Michael (November 3, 2010). "Patrick roars to 2d term". The Boston Globe. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Massachusetts primary election 2010". The Washington Post. September 14, 2010. Retrieved November 15, 2010. 
  4. ^ Chabot, Hillary (April 2, 2009). "Deval: I will run again". Boston Herald. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b Alexander Burns (February 5, 2010). "Ross launches Patrick primary challenge". Politico. 
  6. ^ Hillary Chabot, Christine McConville & Jessica Van Sack (July 8, 2009). "Charles D. Baker leaving Harvard Pilgrim to run for governor". Boston Herald. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  7. ^ Matt Collette (April 27, 2009). "Mihos plans another run for governor". The Boston Globe. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  8. ^ Stein to jump into gov race with Green-Rainbow bid Boston Herald, January 7, 2010
  9. ^ "Gubernatorial candidate Jill Stein of Green-Rainbow Party, introduces lieutenant governor candidate Richard P. Purcell, of Holyoke". The Republican (Springfield). April 3, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Tim for Governor". 
  11. ^ "Baker a favorite for 2010 among Massachusetts delegates". Politicker.com. 
  12. ^ Shore, South. "Profile of Potential Candidates: Bob Hedlund". Red Mass Group. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  13. ^ Shore won, South. "Profile of Potential Candidates: Joe Malone". Red Mass Group. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  14. ^ Shore, South. "Profile of Potential Candidates: Kerry Healey". Red Mass Group. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Charlie Baker 2010 Governor". Draftcharlie.com. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Draft Mike Sullivan for Governor". Draftsullivan.com. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  17. ^ Shore, South. "Profile of Potential Candidates: Michael Sullivan". Red Mass Group. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  18. ^ "GOP throws full support behind Charlie Baker for governor". Boston Herald. Retrieved April 23, 2010. 
  19. ^ Ebbert, Stephanie (June 2, 2010). "Always on the run: Despite lack of funds, mounting string of losses, quixotic politicians carry on for their causes". The Boston Globe. Retrieved June 2, 2010. 
  20. ^ "2010 State Election Candidates". Secretary of the Commonwealth, Elections Division. Retrieved October 5, 2010. 
  21. ^ a b Johnson, Glen (October 8, 2010). "Mass. Lottery chief: No ad collusion with Cahill". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 
  22. ^ Phillips, Frank (October 7, 2010). "Cahill files lawsuit alleging dirty political tricks in Mass". The Boston Globe. 
  23. ^ Stephanie Ebbert and Michael Levenson (October 9, 2010). "Campaign crossfire hotter still". The Boston Globe. Retrieved January 5, 2012. 
  24. ^ Denise Lavoie; Glen Johnson (October 14, 2010). "E-mails appear to link Mass. candidate, lottery ad". The Associated Press. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 
  25. ^ Phillips, Frank (April 2, 2012). "Timothy Cahill indicted on charges of using official funds for campaign-boosting ads". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 
  26. ^ Cassidy, Chris (December 12, 2012). "Tim Cahill ‘thrilled’ that mistrial declared". Boston Herald. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  27. ^ Source: "OCPF Searchable Campaign Finance Database & Electronic Filing System". Massachusetts Office of Campaign and Political Finance. November 1, 2010. Retrieved November 15, 2010. 
  28. ^ "2010 Return of Votes Complete Statistics". Massachusetts Elections Division. December 1, 2010. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Debates[edit]

Campaign[edit]