Mount Yōtei

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Mount Yōtei
羊蹄山 Yōtei-zan
Yotei-zan-from-hirafu.jpg
Mount Yōtei from Hirafu (May 20, 2005)
Elevation 1,898 m (6,227 ft)[1]
Prominence 1,878 m (6,161 ft)[1]
Listing List of mountains and hills of Japan by height
100 Famous Japanese Mountains
List of volcanoes in Japan
Ultra
Location
Mount Yōtei is located in Japan
Mount Yōtei
Mount Yōtei
Hokkaidō, Japan
Coordinates 42°49′36″N 140°48′41″E / 42.82667°N 140.81139°E / 42.82667; 140.81139Coordinates: 42°49′36″N 140°48′41″E / 42.82667°N 140.81139°E / 42.82667; 140.81139[1]
Topo map Geographical Survey Institute 25000:1 羊蹄山
50000:1 留寿都
Geology
Type Stratovolcano
Age of rock Quaternary
Last eruption 1050 BCE

Mount Yōtei (羊蹄山 Yōtei-zan, literally "sheep-hoof mountain"?) is an active[2] stratovolcano located in Shikotsu-Toya National Park, Hokkaidō, Japan. It is also called Yezo Fuji or Ezo Fuji (蝦夷富士?), "Ezo" being an old name for the island of Hokkaido, because it resembles the more famous Mount Fuji. The mountain is also known as Makkari Nupuri (マツカリヌプリ?) and Mount Shiribeshi (後方羊蹄山 Shiribeshi-yama?).[2] It is one of the 100 famous mountains in Japan.

Geology[edit]

Mount Yotei is mostly composed of andesite and dacite.[2][3] The stratovolcano is symmetrical adding to its resemblance to Mount Fuji.

Eruptive history[edit]

Tephrochronology indicates two eruptions at Mount Yotei. The most recent circa 1050 BC from a cone emerging from the northwest flank of the mountain at Lake Hangetsu (Hangetsu-ko). The earlier eruption is dated from circa 3550 BC.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c http://www.peaklist.org/WWlists/ultras/japan.html
  2. ^ a b c "YOTEI-ZAN". Quaternary Volcanoes in Japan. Geological Survey of Japan, AIST. 2006. Retrieved 2008-09-27. 
  3. ^ "Yotei". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 3 December 2009. 
  4. ^ "Yotei:Eruptive History". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 3 December 2009.