Nukunu

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Nukunu [Alternative Names Wongaidja (valid alternative), Nukuna, Nukunnu, Nugunu, Nookoona, Nukunna, Noocoona, Nokunna, Nu-guna, Pukunna (misprint), Wongaidja, Wongaidya, Tura (['tura] = man), Tyura, Doora, Eura (general term for several tribes), Warra (name of language), Barutadura (men of Baroota)],[1] are another pre-eminent enduring Original Sovereign tribe of indigenous Australians who inhabite the coastal region of South Australia which since 28 Dec 1836, now contains the cities of Port Pirie and Port Augusta. Nukunu once widely spoke Nukunu language. Nukunu (SC96/5) SA Parties to Native Title mediation 8 June 2001.[2]

Location[edit]

Nukunu Nation

Eastern side of Spencer Gulf from a little north of the mouth of the Broughton River and vicinity of Crystal Brook northward to Port Augusta; east to Melrose, Mount Remarkable, Gladstone, and Quorn; at Baroota. The Ngaiawang of the Murray River used the term Nokunno as name of a fabulous Being who went about by night killing people. The Kaurna tribe term ['nokun:a] has a meaning of an imaginary being, like a man, who prowls at night and kills, an assassin (Teichelmann and Schürmann, 1840). The Nukunu were the southeasternmost tribe to practice subincision, in addition to circumcision, as a male initiation rite. Pangkala men used the pronunciation ['Nukuna] for the name. The few survivors were settled at Baroota inland from Port Germein where they are known as Barutadura.[3]

Bibliography[4][edit]

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  • Beddome, H.L. 1886, ‘Marachowie’, in E.M. Curr ed., The Australian Race: its Origin, Languages, Customs, Place of Landing in Australia, and the Routes by Which It Spread Itself, Vol. 2, Government Printers, Melbourne, pp. 132–135.
  • Berndt, R.M. & C.H. 1993, A World That Was: The Yaraldi of the Murray Lakes, South Australia, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne.
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  • Elkin, A.P. 1938, ‘Kinship in South Australia’, Oceania, vol. 8, pp. 419–452.
  • Ellis, A.M., Ellis, C. J. & Hercus, L. 1966, ‘Recordings made during 1963-65 field work’, MS AITSIS PMS564.
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  • Hack, B. 1879, ‘The Mount Remarkable Tribe’, in G. Taplin ed., The Folklore Manners, Customs, And Languages Of The South Australian Aborigines: Gathered From Inquiries Made By Authority Of South Australian Government (1971), Government Print, Johnson Reprint Corporation, London, pp. 64–66.
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  • Hercus, L. 1992, A Nukunu Dictionary, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  • Hercus, L.A. & Potezny V. 1999, ‘‘Finch’ versus ‘Finch-Water’: a study of Aboriginal place-names in South Australia’, Records of the South Australian Museum, vol. 2, no. 31, pp. 165–180.
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  • Le Brun, S. 1886, ‘Port Pirie, Forty Miles East Of’, in E.M. Curr ed., The Australian Race: Its origin, languages, customs, place of landing in Australia, and the routes by which it spread itself over that continent, vol. 2, John Ferres Government Printers, Melbourne, pp. 140–142.
  • Mathews, R.M. 1900, ‘Divisions of the South Australian Aborigines’, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 39, pp. 78–93.
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  • Schurmann, C.W. 1844, Vocabulary of the Parnkalla Language Spoken By The Natives Inhabiting The Western Shores of Spencer’s Gulf (1962), George Dehane, Adelaide, Reprint Public Library of South Australia.
  • Schurmann, C.W. 1879, ‘The Aboriginal Tribes of Port Lincoln in South Australia Their Mode of Life, Manners, Customs, Etc’, in J.D. Woods ed., The Native Tribes of South Australia (1997), Australiana Facsimile Editions no. 215, pp. 207–251.
  • Sutton, P. 1995, Country: Aboriginal Boundaries and Land Ownership in Australia, Aboriginal History Inc., Canberra.
  • Taplin, G. ed. 1879, The Folklore Manners, Customs, and Languages Of The South Australian Aborigines: Gathered From Inquiries Made By Authority Of South Australian Government (1971), Government Printers, Johnson Reprint Corporation, London.
  • Teichelmann, C.G. & Schurmann, C.W. 1840, Outlines of a Grammar, Vocabulary, and Phraseology, of the Aboriginal Language of South Australia, Spoken by the Natives in and for Some Distance around Adelaide, published by the authors, Adelaide.
  • Tindale, N.B. 1937, ‘Two Legends of The Ngadjuri Tribe From The Middle North Of South Australia’, Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, vol. 61, pp. 149–153.
  • Tindale, N.B. 1940, ‘Results of the Harvard-Adelaide Universities Anthropological expedition, 1938-1939, Distribution of Australian Aboriginal Tribes: A Field Survey’, Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, vol. 64, no.1.
  • Tindale, N.B. 1959, Ecology of Primitive Aboriginal Man in Australia, Utgerverij, Den Haag, pp. 36–51.
  • Tindale, N.B. 1974, Aboriginal Tribes of Australia: Their Terrain, Environmental Controls, Distribution, Limits, and Proper Names, Australian National University Press, Canberra.
  • Valentine, J.C. 1886, ‘Mt Remarkable’, in E.M. Curr ed., The Australian Race: It’s origin, languages, customs, place of landing in Australia, and the routes by which it spread itself over that continent, Vol. 2, John Ferres, Government Printers, Melbourne, pp. 136–139.
  • Willhelmi, C. 1860, ‘Manners and Customs of the Australian Natives, in Particular of the Port Lincoln District’, Transactions of the Royal Society of Victoria, vol. 5, pp. 164–203.

References[edit]

  • Hercus, Luise Anna (1992). "Introduction". A Nukunu Dictionary. Maitland, South Australia: National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry. 

External links[edit]