Talk:Belial

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The definition of Belial[edit]

I notice that the only consistency in the translations of the word Belial, are "without". Now, in the article the translations of scholars are listed, but they cannot agree. Therefore I think that the definition of Belial should be considered simply "wihtout", and the supply a list of what it may be without. There is no common agreement by scholars except "wihtout", therefore by the principles of academia that should be the definition.

I think either the Hebrew spelling or the English transliteration of the Hebrew spelling must be incorrect. The Hebrew word listed appears to have a samekh (ס) in it. Samekh makes an "s" sound. -- Mwalcoff 23:45, 30 January 2006 (UTC)

questionable material[edit]

I have removed this because I think it is not true.

is the name for a demon in the Old Testament. He has been identified with Satan, both as a minion of Satan and sometimes as another name for Satan himself. Among certain Jewish sects, this demon was considered the chief of all the devils. He is also called "the angel of lawlessness" and "the king of this world", and is sometimes considered the father of idolatrous nations and the source of the seven spirits of seduction that enter men at birth, the source of impurity and lying, and the spirit of darkness.

I think calling someone a son of belial is no more a litteral phrase in Hebrew than calling someone a son of a bitch in English. That the phrase son of a bitch abounds does not mean English speakers beleave in a she-demon named bitch that is the source of evil. Further, I think that the views expressed here have their source in II Corinthians and express a specifically Christian point of view. It is wrong to ascribe to Jews the beliefs of Christians.

If someone thinks I am wrong - i.e. that the above passage is right, then I ask simply that they cite sources. What is the first text or commentary that explicitly identifies Belial as a demon? What is the first text or commantary to identify Belial with Satan? Or as the angel of lawlessness? Or as king of this world? Or as the father of idolotrous nations? Or as the source of the seven spirits of seduction? If any of these claims are true by all means put them back in but comply withour NPOV and NOR policy and provide sources and context - who made these claims, and when, and where? Slrubenstein | Talk 12:41, 28 May 2006 (UTC)

Unclear[edit]

Belial is referred to as Satan when asked by St. Paul as to how Christ and Belial can agree.

This sentence doesn't make sense. It lacks a subject: Who referred to Belial as Satan?
Paul.

Trivia section[edit]

The Trivia section in this article keeps getting updated and then reverted back. The problem is, the stuff that's in there right now is not really important at all. For example, Billy Liar article doesn't even mention the fact listed here in trivia. While in Angel Sanctuary Belial is a very important character and that stuff got deleted.--Ti-Ana 15:26, 17 January 2007 (UTC)

Belial in Fiction[edit]

Belial was the main antagonist in the game Lands of Lore 2: Guardians of Destiny. But I'm not sure if the Belial in the game is the same Belial that this article is talking about, or if it should be mentioned. --DevilSavior 05:16, 1 February 2007

It may be an uphill battle but I'm going to keep at it. This article should not mention every video game, comic, and bit of trivia that uses the name Belial. Fictional references should be limited to those that refer to the Belial that is the subject of the article, not any miscellaneous demon or evil spirit that the gamemaker puts in and gives the name to. The Huxley reference is just at the edge of suitable. 69.3.208.246 05:01, 3 May 2007 (UTC)

"Sons of Belial"[edit]

Additional use of the term can be found in the readings of the seer Edgar Cayce, specifically in Edgar Cayce on Atlantis by Edgar Evans Cayce, under the authorship of Hugh Lynn Cayce (NY:Hawthorn Books,1968). The term is used there to refer to the conflicting entities of Atlantis. They were identified as the "Sons of Belial" who operated in opposition to the "Sons of the Law of One." (pg.66). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.200.197.161 (talk) 11:21, 23 August 2008 (UTC)

In addition to Edgar Cayce referral to "sons of belial", he also referred to "Law of One" and to "Jon Peniel" as bringing a message. The thing is; The book Children of the Law of One & The lost teachings of atlantis by Jon Peniel published in 1997 (as foretold by Edgar Cayce(R.I.P. 1945)) describes the teachings of a pre-buddhistic monastery in the Himalaya's of Tibet. This monastery claims their heritage is from Atlantis, where there was a split between the 'sons of Belial' and the 'children of the Law of One'. This supposedly non-fictional writing shares the teachings 'Law of One' with for example the book 'Ra material' and various other sources.

Wouldn't be any of this be suitable for addition to the main page? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.80.87.156 (talk) 12:02, 31 August 2010 (UTC)

Uwe Boll redirect?[edit]

Why does a search for the director Uwe Boll (who used to have his own article) redirect me to Belial? --98.180.209.248 (talk) 01:08, 14 April 2009 (UTC)

i'd assume somebody decided to have fun and name him the devil J1j2j3 (talk) 01:10, 14 April 2009 (UTC)

Well, it needs to be undone. I'm not sure how to do that, but it needs to be taken care of. --98.180.209.248 (talk) 01:15, 14 April 2009 (UTC)

Major clear up[edit]

Well I put everything in chronological order and beefed/refed up the first section. Trimmed/cut some of the occult stuff. Trivia off to Belial in popular culture. In ictu oculi (talk) 12:48, 29 September 2012 (UTC)