Talk:Golden calf

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Though there is as yet no discussion here, User:CheeseDreams has applied NPOV and cleanup notices to this page and others. The contributions of this user to the article may be assessed at the article's Page History. --Wetman 23:51, 17 Nov 2004 (UTC)

tags[edit]

See history for explanation.


"It is also not clear why it might be involved with bringing the people up from Egypt"

It's not clear because it wasn't involved. It's clear from the episode development that Aaron was making it up from his lack of trust on Moses after the later delayed to go back.

Should not the fact that the calf was seen as an image of Yahweh in the northern kingdom be mentioned?--Rob117 03:31, 1 September 2006 (UTC)

Could the have been (seen as) symbolic of the popular Egyptian goddess, Hathor?

Also, the popular culture section ought to reference the Golden Calf scene in Cecil B. DeMille's Ten Commandments film...

Scientific Accuracy[edit]

We should add a section questioning the validity of the claims. Gold is neither flammable nor water soluble yet in the story it behaves in a way incosistent with current chemical knowledge. I propose a new section detailing this. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 72.50.35.38 (talk) 23:54, 17 January 2007 (UTC).

That would be original research, not allowed here. Also, it says he "burned the high place", not the calf, and doesn't say the gold dissolved in the water, simply that it was scattered on it. --tjstrf talk 00:20, 18 January 2007 (UTC)

While that's true the summary given for the story is "Moses then burnt the golden calf in the fire, ground it to powder, scattered it on water, and forced the Israelites to drink it." Additionally it would not count as original research as the current article on Gold already contains all the information and references required namely, "Heat, moisture, oxygen, and most corrosive agents have very little chemical effect on gold, making it well-suited for use in coins and jewelry...". The article on colloidal gold likewise contains more than enough information to make the conclusion that the likely conditions of the burning were unlikely to produce water soluble gold compounds.


The passage reads: "He took the calf which they had made and burned it with fire, and ground it to powder, and scattered it over the surface of the water and made the sons of Israel drink it."

Gold is not flammable but its burning is possible and results in its melting. There should not be any discussion about disolving gold here as the passage makes no mention of dissolving. We are simply told that the gold dust is scattered (not scattered then dissolved) over the surface of the water.

The Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary also notes the common confusion about "burning" gold (melting it) and clears up the "scatter" question. --Lleveque (talk) 20:57, 7 April 2009 (UTC)

Biblical Inaccuracy[edit]

Quote from the section "Aaron's statement", in the second paragraph:

According to Exodus 32:4 the golden calf is made and Aaron says "This is your god (singular) O Israel, who brought you up from the land of Egypt.

According to the Interlinear Scripture Analyser available from http://www.scripture4all.org/ the original Hebrew for the second half of the verse reads through transliteration:

"and·they-are-saying these Elohim-of·you Israel who they-brought-up·you from·land-of Egypt".

Assuming this transliteration is correct, there are two problems with the quotation of the cited verse. First that Aaron (alone?) made the statement and second that the use of the word god (Elohim) was in a singular context. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.224.129.156 (talk) 23:52, 27 October 2007 (UTC)

As the rabbis say, the answer is next to it. What did the people ask for? Gods who would walk (plural verb) before them. And that's what Aaron gave them. Gods with plural verbs. Every time elohim is used of the Jewish Gd, it has a singular verb. 4.249.198.4 (talk) 00:45, 31 January 2008 (UTC)

Flight of personal fancy?[edit]

Of what is the following text, moved here, an encyclopedia-worthy report?Wetman (talk) 03:54, 6 November 2008 (UTC) The Hebrew word calf can also mean circle. This might seem to indicate that they made a RA symbol rather than cast a calf, which would require a difficult manufacturing process with furnace, beeswax, clay, etc.

Abbreviations[edit]

What do the letters E and J stand for? I think it would be clearer if the entire words/ names were spelled out (although I didn't read the article thoroughly). 惑乱 Wakuran (talk) 12:39, 7 July 2011 (UTC) I have clarified this a little, readers can also follow the link the the Documentary Hypothesis article in Wikipedia.Drg55 (talk) 07:56, 3 November 2011 (UTC)

What about Christianity?[edit]

The Old testament is also an important piece for Christianity.

The Old testament and new testament go together very nice like. You will find, if you read the whole thing, that Jesus taught from the old testament, and that the prophets prophesied about Jesus. Moses even taught about Jesus.

--HolyandClean (talk) 17:22, 22 October 2011 (UTC)HolyandClean

Quranic Version[edit]

Tagged for tone, as the section is poorly written. I don't have a Quran to reference, so I'm avoiding reworking this section. Also, no appropriate citations. Woodega (talk) 21:20, 23 April 2012 (UTC)

I have edited the section now, how is it now? Raymond Phoenix (talk) 08:20, 6 July 2012 (UTC)

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Raymond Phoenix (talk) 15:42, 5 August 2012 (UTC)