Talk:Politics of Italy

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WikiProject Italy (Rated Start-class, Top-importance)
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Votes of Confidence[edit]

I know that with Italy's proportional/additional member system it is unlikely, but what would happen if the two houses had majorities from different parties/coalitions? Italy is the only country I have heard of where the prime minister needs the confidence of two separate non-figurehead legislative houses. My guess is that a new election would have to be called, and/or some ugly super-coalition government would be formed. Xyzzyva 00:21, 30 April 2006 (UTC)

That's just what happened in Italy some days ago. In this case the prime minister has two options: either he resigns, or he tries to expand the coalition by making agreements with other political parties. If he resigns, another two options: either new elections are indicted, or he (or another politician from the same coalition) forms another government with new political parties.--Gspinoza 20:46, 10 March 2007 (UTC)

ITALIANS[edit]

I talians rock!!!!! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.44.115.56 (talk) 11:49, 20 February 2009 (UTC)

ATTENTION[edit]

the time it took you to read this sentence there have been 20 italian governments installed and ended. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.233.255.92 (talk) 08:07, 5 May 2009 (UTC)

Important notice[edit]

The government section of the "Outline of Italy" needs to be checked, corrected, and completed -- especially the subsections for the government branches.

When the country outlines were created, temporary data (that matched most of the countries but not all) was used to speed up the process. Those countries for which the temporary data does not match must be replaced with the correct information.

Please check that this country's outline is not in error.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact The Transhumanist .

Thank you.

Number of governments[edit]

The article states: "There have been frequent government turnovers since 1945, indeed there have been 61 governments in this time."

However, the article doesn't clearly explain what constitutes a government turnover, which isn't obvious to non-Italians given that the Christian Democracy held the prime ministership for 35 straight years during that period. List of Prime Ministers of Italy sheds some light on this; it appears that a government is considered to turnover when (a) there is a legislative election, (b) a party goes into or comes out of the government coalition, or (c) the prime minister changes. But that still doesn't explain all the government changes; I see that on 23 August 1982, there was a change between Giovanni Spadolini's 1st and 2nd governments, yet both governments had a DC-PSI-PSDI-PRI-PLI coalition. So how is an Italian government turnover defined? --Metropolitan90 (talk) 04:30, 29 May 2010 (UTC)

Italy is a Parliament-based system. A government changes when the parliament expires or when the parliament doesn't agree anymore to sustain the government team and actions.
When this happens a "crisis procedure" starts, the prime minister resign, the President of Republic interview the parliament groups leaders and decide for a new president and mandate.
Sometime it happens the new president is the same as the old one, but the "team" and "program" are rearranged to reflect the parliament opinions. The new team ask for a formal parliament approval, and -if it happens- the crisis closes.
When it is not possible to find a new agreement, the President of Republic dismiss the parliament and ask new elections.
Now, since during the "crisis" no government formally exist, even if the prime minister and the supporting coalition remain the same, we cannot say it is the same government. And we cannot even speak about "cabinet reshuffle" since there is no "cabinet": Citizens vote for the parliament composition, not for the president. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.116.246.120 (talk) 13:32, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

Political parties and elections[edit]

The colors in the figures of the "Political parties and elections" section are out of sync with the table -- dramatically so. Westringia f. (talk) 13:43, 1 August 2010 (UTC)

Corruption[edit]

There doesn't seem to be much mention of corruption? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.149.1.46 (talk) 22:11, 5 May 2011 (UTC)

A technical update?[edit]

As far as I can see, the current governo tecnico under Monti is mentioned only in the lede. In the main article, the Second Republic subsection stops at Berlusconi IV. MistyMorn (talk) 13:28, 15 February 2012 (UTC)

"Government"[edit]

The introductory section of "Government", before the "Head of State" subsection, seems completely redundant and even a little condescending in tone - an explanation of what democracy is in children's terms does not, IMO, belong here. Chuborno (talk) 17:52, 27 August 2013 (UTC)