Talk:Soyuz (spacecraft)

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Number of modules[edit]

  • A Soyuz spacecraft in its crew transfer version consists of five modules. There are three pressurized modules: the Habitable Module, the Descent Module, and the Instrument Module. There are two unpressurized modules: the Adapter Module, and the Assembly Module. The article should be corrected to reflect this.—Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.138.207.139 (talkcontribs)
Of course it would be great to cite a source for this! (Sdsds - Talk) 21:01, 20 May 2007 (UTC)

L1[edit]

L3 naming[edit]

All of soviet space systems (spacecrafts, launchers etc) after development under letter-figure designation with start of open using obtained the official full name in the form of any word. Moreover, for some systems the full name were given before or without the exploitation: Almaz spacestation by Chelomey bureau, Sever spacecraft by Korolyuov bureau, Zvezda military spacecraft by Kozlov bureau (predecessor of 7K-VI), etc. From the Soyuz family the circumlunar spacecraft 7K-L1 became Zond. What official or unofficial full name was intended for L3 complex (or for 7K-L3 and 7K-LK separately)?

Versions[edit]

I'm adding infoboxes for several Soyuz versions, as a first step in moving that information into separate articles. Not a very nice layout right now, but keeps all info in one place. Ricnun 22:55, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

OK, created pages for all the different versions, and moved most of the images and data there. Let's see how this works over time. Ricnun 00:24, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Dimensions[edit]

Says diameter is 13.61 ft/2.72 m and height 57.44 ft/7.48 m . Isn't a meter just over 3 feet?69.95.76.15 23:10, 12 July 2007 (UTC)

57.44 feet = 17.507712 meters. Maybe someone lost the leading "1"? (sdsds - talk) 04:41, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

"Volume = 254.27 sq ft (23.622 m2)" doesn't make much sense as m² is a measure for area. also the conversion sq ft - m² is off by a factor near 10, so apparently someone forgot the last digit of the sq ft-number —Preceding unsigned comment added by 212.192.251.21 (talk) 16:40, 17 April 2010 (UTC)

Soyuz LK-XX subsections[edit]

it is unclear to me the differences and relationships between the different LK-XX spacecraft.. but it strikes me that instead of having a different subsection for each one, the reader would benefit more from have a couple of paragraphs outlining the differences, and developments. i'll take a crack at this, but i might get something wrong. Mlm42 10:08, 18 September 2007 (UTC)

Deeper meaning of name[edit]

I reverted this edit, which was made with the comment, "Deeper meaning to 'Soyuz' in relation to Soviet nationalism". I would like to have this content be part of Wikipedia, but I was concerned that it was not properly sourced and may not have been NPOV. Also, the soyuz programme article might be a better place for discussion of the meaning of the name. (sdsds - talk) 20:33, 19 October 2007 (UTC)

Preformance[edit]

This article lacks one of most important statistic for any spacecraft: how much was flown and how much succesfully. I know about two flights that ended in LOC, but how much was flown in general?? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Madcio (talkcontribs) 16:46, 23 October 2007 (UTC)

It is the most successful/safest/most reliable spacecraft in history, judging from number of mission to number of problems arising from those missions.

It may be now, it was a deathtrap. Poor Komarov. All the problems they had with the unmanned test flights and yet they still sent him up.--172.190.50.66 (talk) 21:37, 19 October 2011 (UTC)

Solid fuel braking[edit]

"At one meter above the ground, solid-fuel braking engines mounted behind the heat shield are fired to give a soft landing."

Is it just me or does the braking engines firing at just above 3 feet off the ground seem a tad low?? JamieHughes (talk) 02:59, 16 May 2010 (UTC)

One meter is correct. This breaking is the direct equivalent of the "splash down" which American capsules used. It just takes the edge off of the final impact. Like an airbag deploying in a car. NeilFraser (talk) 08:37, 27 September 2010 (UTC)

Reentry or Descent - Terminology Consistency[edit]

Reentry Module and Descent Module seem to be used interchangeably throughout the text. Which is the correct term that should then be used consistently throughout the article? CliffVHarris (talk) 12:43, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

As a data point, currently the NASA web page discussing the Soyuz module uses the Descent Module term (capitalized) exclusively. Damienjr (talk) 18:15, 26 May 2013 (UTC)

"the Soyuz has an unusual sequence of events prior to re-entry."[edit]

Really? The one spacecraft type that has outlived all other spacecraft types in terms of service duration does something 'unusual'? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 131.107.0.81 (talk) 18:20, 3 November 2011 (UTC)

Cosmonaut height accommodation[edit]

This article says:

Soyuz TMA (A: антропометрический, Antropometricheskii meaning anthropometric) features several changes to accommodate requirements requested by NASA in order to service the International Space Station, including more latitude in the height and weight of the crew and improved parachute systems.

I think this section should state the approximate maximum cosmonaut height of the Soyuz TM and the Soyuz TMA. Neutrino1200 (talk) 06:16, 21 February 2012 (UTC)