Talk:Taijitu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject China  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject China, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of China related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject East Asia (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject East Asia, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of East Asia on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Origin[edit]

When and where did the East Asian Taijitu originate from? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.105.21.201 (talk) 13:00, 11 September 2010 (UTC)

It comes from Chinese culture! Chinese culture is 5000 years old and maybe not comprehended by Western mind. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:306:C5F7:EB00:7C02:3760:51CC:D764 (talk) 04:01, 8 January 2013 (UTC)

http://xingyimax.com/more-about-taiji-symbols-of-ukraine-pavilion-at-expo-2010/ 178.36.13.155 (talk) 08:49, 27 May 2013 (UTC)

Symmetry[edit]

This article refers to the yin-yang symbol as symmetrical. However, for an image to be symmetrical, it has to consist of two halves that are mirror images of each other. The yin-yang symbol is made up of two halves that are 180 degree rotations of each other, not mirror images. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.164.128.78 (talk) 06:36, 15 March 2012 (UTC)

See Rotational symmetry. --Thnidu (talk) 04:01, 5 July 2014 (UTC)

Why include the foreigner's things?[edit]

The taiji concept is Chinese origin, from the well-spring of ancient knowledge. Please don't pollute the concept with the foreign things, especially from those time of Western had no culture, only the caveman things. You should think long and hard to respect Chinese culture. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:306:C5F7:EB00:7C02:3760:51CC:D764 (talk) 04:04, 8 January 2013 (UTC)

Learn something about respect, yourself, before you post again. --Thnidu (talk) 04:04, 5 July 2014 (UTC)


Dear unsigned user, this is an English-language page dealing with a symbol whose usage was first attested in a European context and not in any "cave art" as you put it but rather in Celtic and Roman art or symbolism, centuries before its attested use anywhere else. The symbol as such is not derived from any Chinese philosophy, it's simply a universal geometric symbol that has come to be used by and has come to be strongly associated with certain Chinese schools of philosophy. Those philosophies have their own pages, if you are looking for them. The fact that this symbol has come to be referred to as a "yin and yang symbol" in English and other European languages, despite its usage being first attested in a European context should be taken as a compliment, not as an affront. Just like for instance the case is with the famous number puzzle game Sudoku, where the Japanese name is used internationally despite Sudoku not being an original Japanese invention. There's absolutely no malicious intent in either case, quite the contrary in fact. It's a direct and explicit recognition of their prominent usage in non-Western contexts. What more could you ask for?
The problem, i.e. your problem, seems to be the fact that what should be a page simply called "yin and yang (symbol)" redirects to "Taijitu" which is a term that (as far as I can tell) more explicitly assumes the whole underlying Chinese philosophical system rather than just the geometric symbol as such. From reading the archived discussions on this page, it seems that the choice of "Taijitu" as the page's name was a concession made because of one very persistent editor who was pushing for the primacy if not exclusivity of this symbol's usage in the context of Chinese philosophy. So, the compromise so to speak was to keep the article's universality but as a concession to name it as if it was about the Chinese philosophical system ;) It's not the best choice of name IMHO, since this philosophical system is dealt with in other Wikipedia pages and the term "Taijitu" is not one commonly used for this symbol internationally, at least not in the English language. The name "Taijitu" will undoubtedly invite a few reactions like yours, since some people will wonder why European symbols appear on a page ostensibly about Chinese philosophy. But this is not the result of anyone pushing a Western/European agenda, this is the intended or unintended result of those pushing for Chinese exclusivity when it comes this symbol as I've already explained above regarding the concession or compromise made with the naming of this page. If it was up to me, I would have moved this page to "yin and yang (symbol)" as that would have made things more clear to you and to everyone else, but my guess is that it wouldn't take long for someone to again start an edit war with the desire to more strongly emphasize the Chinese philosophical system and then we would probably end up again with another bad compromise ;)
Abvgd (talk) 12:11, 27 September 2014 (UTC)


http://xingyimax.com/more-about-taiji-symbols-of-ukraine-pavilion-at-expo-2010/ 178.36.13.155 (talk) 08:49, 27 May 2013 (UTC)

Why paragraph on taijitu in Trypillian culture removed?[edit]

If mentions of similar symbols among Celts and Romans are present, why is mentions of Trypillian culture removed? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 178.36.43.201 (talk) 12:08, 18 July 2013 (UTC) I added informations on this subject again. Examples are easly visible on photos from articles in references. 178.36.43.201 (talk) 12:30, 18 July 2013 (UTC)