Tomislav Ivković

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Tomislav Ivković
Personal information
Full name Tomislav Ivković
Date of birth (1960-08-11) 11 August 1960 (age 53)
Place of birth Zagreb, SFR Yugoslavia
Height 1.89 m (6 ft 2 12 in)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Club information
Current team
Lokomotiva (coach)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1978–1982 Dinamo Zagreb 53 (1)
1983 Dinamo Vinkovci 15 (0)
1983–1984 Red Star 46 (0)
1985–1986 Wacker Innsbruck 23 (0)
1986–1988 Swarovski Tirol 65 (1)
1988 Wiener Sport-Club 15 (0)
1989 Genk 14 (0)
1989–1993 Sporting CP 133 (0)
1993 Estoril 9 (0)
1994 Vitória Setúbal 17 (0)
1994–1996 Belenenses 64 (0)
1996–1997 Salamanca 6 (0)
1997–1998 Estrela Amadora 34 (0)
Total 494 (2)
National team
1983–1991 Yugoslavia 38 (0)
Teams managed
2009 Persepolis (assistant)
2010 Međimurje
2011– Lokomotiva
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Tomislav Ivković (born 11 August 1960) is a Croatian retired footballer who played as a goalkeeper, and the current manager of NK Lokomotiva.

Other than in his country he spent much of his career in Portugal, appearing for five different clubs in almost one decade (namely Sporting).

Ivković was also a Yugoslavian international in the late 1980s and early 1990s, representing the nation in one World Cup and one European Championship.

Club career[edit]

Ivković was born in Zagreb, Croatia, Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. He started his professional career playing for NK Dinamo Zagreb in 1978, moving to Dinamo Vinkovci in January 1983 and soon after to Red Star Belgrade.

In 1985, Ivković transferred to his first foreign club as he joined FC Tirol Innsbruck from Austria, where he played until 1988. After short spells with Wiener Sport-Club and K.R.C. Genk, Ivković moved to Sporting Clube de Portugal in 1989, and remained there for the following four seasons, rarely missing a game, although he did not collect any silverware.

Ivković's final years were also spent in Portugal, with G.D. Estoril Praia, Vitória de Setúbal, C.F. Os Belenenses and C.F. Estrela da Amadora, before leaving the game in 1998. Prior to Estrela he contributed with six matches for UD Salamanca's 1997 promotion to La Liga, retiring finally at 38.

In 2007 Ivković began his coaching career, first as goalkeeper coach at United Arab Emirates' Al-Shaab. Two years later he had his first bench experience, serving as assistant manager at Persepolis FC.

In April 2010, Ivković got his first job as head coach at NK Međimurje, in the Croatian first division. During his short one-month spell, the team recorded two wins, one draw and four defeats, eventually ranking in 15th position, out of 16 teams, with the subsequent relegation.

International career[edit]

Ivković appeared in a total of 38 full internationals for the Yugoslav national team, between 1983 and 1991. His first major international tournament was UEFA Euro 1984 in France, where he was the team's second-choice behind Zoran Simović: the nation lost all of its three group matches at the tournament, with Ivković's only appearance coming in the team's second game, a 0–5 defeat to Denmark. During the same year, however, he also won the bronze medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.[1]

Ivković went on to start for Yugoslavia at the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy, appearing in all of the team's five games at the tournament before they were defeated by Argentina on penalties in the quarter-finals: in that match, he became famous for saving Diego Maradona's kick during the shootout (mere months earlier, Ivković had already saved a penalty from Maradona in the UEFA Cup action, when Sporting played S.S.C. Napoli, and the two allegedly had a bet on the possible outcome of another penalty before their World Cup match, which Ivković won).[2]

Starting in the 2004 summer, Ivković was the goalkeeping coach of the Croatian national team, during Zlatko Kranjčar's time as the team's head manager. He left the post in July 2006, as the contracts of the entire coaching staff were not renewed after the national team failed to reach the knock-out stages of the 2006 World Cup in Germany.

References[edit]

External links[edit]