USS Meredith (DD-165)

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For other ships of the same name, see USS Meredith.
USS Meredith (DD-165)
Career (US)
Namesake: Jonathan Meredith
Builder: Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts
Laid down: 26 June 1918
Launched: 22 September 1918
Commissioned: 29 January 1919
Decommissioned: 28 June 1922
Struck: 7 January 1936
Fate: Sold for scrapping 29 September 1936
General characteristics
Class & type: Wickes class destroyer
Displacement: 1,284 tons
Length: 314 ft 5 in (95.83 m)
Beam: 30 ft 11 in (9.42 m)
Draft: 9 ft 2 in (2.79 m)
Speed: 35 knots (65 km/h)
Complement: 101 officers and enlisted
Armament: 4 × 4" (102 mm), 2 × 1 pdrs. (0.454 kg), 4 × 21" (533 mm) torpedo tubes

The first USS Meredith (DD–165) was a Wickes class destroyer in the United States Navy during the World War I . She was named for Jonathan Meredith.

History[edit]

Meredith was laid down 26 June 1918 by Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts; launched 22 September 1918; sponsored by Mrs. William F. Meredith, wife of the great-grandnephew of Sergeant Meredith; and commissioned at Boston 29 January 1919, Commander H. H. Michaels in command.

Assigned to Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, Meredith proceeded to Newport, Rhode Island, for torpedoes and 18 February began a shakedown cruise to Cuba. However, she received orders 22 February to join five other destroyers as escort to George Washington, returning President Woodrow Wilson from France to Boston. On 26 February, she resumed her shakedown.

Meredith departed New York 1 May for Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland, to serve as a guide post for the first transoceanic flight, as Navy Curtis flying boats spanned the Atlantic from Long Island to Plymouth, England. Returning to Boston 22 May, Meredith cruised the east and gulf coasts with Destroyer Flotilla 2 until November, then served out of Newport for training, particularly target practice, until November, when she went into repair at Norfolk.

Rejoining her division at Charleston, South Carolina, 26 January 1922, she participated in maneuvers until 5 April when she went into Philadelphia Navy Yard for inactivation. Decommissioned 28 June 1922, Meredith remained at Philadelphia until, in accordance with the London Naval Treaty, she was sold for scrapping 29 September 1936.

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