United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2012

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United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2012
Massachusetts
2010 ←
November 6, 2012 → 2014

All 10 Massachusetts seats in the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 10 seats, 100.0% 0 seats, 0.0%
Seats before 10 0
Seats won 9 0
Seat change Decrease 1 Steady
Popular vote 1,544,103 693,624
Percentage 66.04% 29.67%
Swing +8.56 -9.18

The 2012 congressional elections in Massachusetts, held on November 6, 2012, determined the nine members of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts elected for two-year terms, serving in the 113th Congress from January 3, 2013 to January 3, 2015. Massachusetts previously had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census, but these were reduced to nine as a result of apportionment following the 2010 Census.[1] All nine incumbents who were re-elected are members of the Democratic Party.

Primary elections were held on September 6, 2012.[2] This primary was on a Thursday, which is rare in Massachusetts, and it was moved from Tuesday, September 18, 2012 because of a conflicting religious holiday.[3]

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2012[4]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,544,103 66.04% 9 -1
Republican 693,624 29.67% 0
Libertarian 16,668 0.71% 0
Independents 83,580 3.57% 0
Totals 2,337,975 100.00% 9 -1

Summary[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
2012 status / Result Candidates
Massachusetts 1 Richard Neal
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic 1988 Re-elected Richard Neal (D) Unopposed
Massachusetts 2 John Olver
Redistricted from the 1st district
Democratic 1991 (Special) Retired
Seat eliminated
Jim McGovern (D) Unopposed
Jim McGovern
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Democratic 1996 Re-elected
Massachusetts 3 Niki Tsongas
Redistricted from the 5th district
Democratic 2007 (Special) Re-elected Niki Tsongas (D) 65.9%
Jon Golnik (R) 34.1%
Massachusetts 4 Barney Frank Democratic 1980 Retired
Democratic hold
Joseph Kennedy III (D) 61.1%
Sean Bielat (R) 36.0%
Massachusetts 5 Ed Markey
Redistricted from the 7th district
Democratic 1976 Re-elected Ed Markey (D) 75.5%
Tom Tierney (R) 24.5%
Massachusetts 6 John Tierney Democratic 1996 Re-elected John Tierney (D) 48.3%
Richard Tisei (R) 47.3%
Daniel Fishman (L) 4.5%
Massachusetts 7 Mike Capuano
Redistricted from the 8th district
Democratic 1998 Re-elected Mike Capuano (D) 83.6%
Karla Romero (I) 16.4%
Massachusetts 8 Stephen Lynch
Redistricted from the 9th district
Democratic 2001 Re-elected Stephen Lynch (D) 76.3%
Joe Selvaggi (R) 23.7%
Massachusetts 9 William R. Keating
Redistricted from the 10th district
Democratic 2010 Re-elected William R. Keating (D) 58.3%
Christopher Sheldon (R) 32.2%
Daniel Botelho (I) 9.0%
Peter White (I)

District 1[edit]

Democrat Richard Neal, who has represented the 2nd district since 1989, was redistricted into the 1st district.[5] He ran for re-election.[6]

Middle Berkshire Register of Deeds Andrea F. Nuciforo Jr., a former state senator;[7] and Bill Shein, a writer,[8] also sought the Democratic nomination. Neal won renomination and was unopposed in the general election.[9]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Neal (Incumbent) 261,936 98.4%
None All Others 4,197 1.6%
Totals 266,133 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

Since 1991, Democrat John Olver, has represented the 1st district, most of which remains in the proposed new 1st district.[1] He was to have been redistricted to the 2nd district, except that he announced his retirement two weeks before the new districts were proposed.[12]

Democrat Jim McGovern, who was redistricted from the 3rd district,[5] ran for re-election.[13] McGovern easily won renomination over newcomer William Feegbeh, and was unopposed in the general election.[9]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district election, 2012 [10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (Incumbent) 259,257 98.5%
No Party All Others 4,078 1.5%
Totals 263,335 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

Democrat Niki Tsongas, who was redistricted from the 5th district,[5] ran for re-election.[14] She was unopposed in the primary.

Jon Golnik, a business consultant who challenged Tsongas as the Republican nominee in the 5th district in 2010,[15] and Tom Weaver, a businessman who also ran as a Republican in the 5th district in 2010,[16] both ran again. Golnik won the GOP nomination and faced Tsongas in the general election.[9]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Niki Tsongas (Incumbent) 212,119 65.9%
Republican Jon Golnik 109,372 34.0%
No Party All Others 262 0.1%
Totals 321,753 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

Democrat Barney Frank, who has represented the 4th district since 1981, retired rather than run for re-election.[17]

Seeking the Democratic nomination were: Rachel Brown LaRouche activist who challenged Frank for the Democratic nomination in 2010;[18] Herb Robinson, a software engineer;[19] and Joseph Kennedy III, a Middlesex County assistant district attorney.[20]

Seeking the Republican nomination were: Sean Bielat, a technology executive who challenged Frank in 2010;[21] Elizabeth Childs, a psychiatrist and member of the Brookline School Committee;[22] and David Steinhof, a dentist.[23]

Kennedy and Bielat won their nominations.[9]

Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Sean
Bielat (R)
Joseph
Kennedy III (D)
Other Undecided
UMass Lowell/Boston Herald February 2–4;
February 6–8, 2012
408 ± 6.4% 28% 60% 4% 7%

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Kennedy III 221,303 61.1%
Republican Sean Bielat 129,936 35.9%
Independent David Rosa 10,741 3.0%
No Party All Others 265 0.1%
Totals 362,245 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

Democrat Ed Markey was redistricted from the 7th district,[5] having represented it since 1976. Jeff Semon, a financial consultant,[24] sought the Republican nomination to challenge Markey.

Gerry Dembrowski, a physician who unsuccessfully challenged Markey as the Republican nominee in 2010, was in the race,[25] but dropped out to run for a seat in the Massachusetts Senate.

Tom Tierney, a consulting actuary,[26] was the Republican nominee.

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Markey (Incumbent) 257,490 75.5%
Republican Tom Tierney 82,944 24.3%
No Party All Others 675 0.2%
Totals 341,109 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

Democrat John Tierney has represented the 6th district since 1997. Richard R. Tisei, the Republican nominee for Lieutenant Governor in the 2010 Massachusetts gubernatorial election challenged him. Daniel Fishman, a Libertarian candidate, who has never run for office before also ran.[27]

Bill Hudak, a Tea Party-endorsed lawyer who unsuccessfully challenged Tierney as the Republican nominee in 2010 announced his candidacy on March 2, 2011,[28] but withdrew on January 23, 2012 to pursue "a business opportunity".[29]

Veteran and military commentator Seth Moulton considered running in the general election as an Independent, but decided against it in July 2012, citing the short time frame left for him to mount a serious campaign.[30]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Tierney (Incumbent) 180,942 48.3%
Republican Richard Tisei 176,612 47.1%
Libertarian Daniel Fishman 16,739 4.5%
No Party All Others 514 0.1%
Totals 374,807 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 7[edit]

In the redistricting Act,[1] this district became a majority-minority district, increasing its reach over several minority precincts near Boston.[5] Democrat Mike Capuano, who was redistricted from the 8th district,[5] having represented it since 1999, ran for re-election.[31] Karla Romero, the founding President and CEO of the non-profit Mass Appeal International and a former Miss USA contestant ran as an Independent.[32]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Capuano (Incumbent) 210,794 83.4%
Independent Karla Romero 41,199 16.3%
No Party All Others 843 0.2%
Totals 252,836 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 8[edit]

Democrat Stephen Lynch, who was redistricted from the old 9th district,[5] will run in the 8th district.[33]

Democrat William R. Keating, who was redistricted from the old 10th district,[5] announced that he would move to Cape Cod (where he already has a summer home), and run there, putting him in the new 9th district (most of which includes his incumbent district[1]) instead of competing against Lynch.[27]

Republican Joe Selvaggi, a US Navy veteran of the first Gulf War, Worcester Polytechnic graduate and owner of local business "Plaster Fun Time" sought the Republican nomination to challenge Lynch in the new 8th Congressional District. Matias "Matt" Temperley, an Iraq War veteran and student, also sought the Republican nomination.[34]

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stephen Lynch (Incumbent) 263,999 76.1%
Republican Joe Selvaggi 82,242 23.7%
No Party All Others 570 0.2%
Totals 346,811 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 9[edit]

There was no incumbent currently residing in this district, but incumbent Democrat William R. Keating, who has represented most of the district for the last two years when it was the 10th district, has a summer home there.[5] As discussed above, he moved to the 9th District.[27] Bristol County District Attorney Samuel Sutter also sought the Democratic nomination.[35] State senator Mark Montigny may also seek the Democratic nomination.[36] Will Flanagan, the mayor of Fall River;[37] Scott W. Lang, the former mayor of New Bedford;[38] Therese Murray, the President of the Massachusetts Senate;[36] and former state senator Robert O'Leary,[39] will not run.

Adam Chaprales, a former Sandwich Selectman,[40] and Christopher Sheldon, a businessman,[41] are seeking the Republican nomination. Plymouth County District Attorney Timothy Cruz may also seek the Republican nomination.[42] State representative Vinny deMacedo;[42] Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson;[43] and former state representative Jeff Perry, who unsuccessfully challenged Keating as the Republican nominee in the 10th district in 2010,[42] will not run.

General Election[edit]

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district election, 2012[10][11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William R. Keating (Incumbent) 212,754 58.7%
Republican Christopher Sheldon 116,531 32.2%
Independent Daniel Botelho 32,655 9.0%
No Party All Others 465 0.1%
Totals 359,060 100%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Acts of 2011: Chapter 177: An Act Establishing Congressional Districts, Approved November 21, 2011". General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved November 28, 2011. , to be codified at Mass. Gen. L. c. 57, § 1
  2. ^ Galvin, William Francis. "2012 Massachusetts State Primary and State Election Schedule" (PDF). Retrieved August 16, 2011. 
  3. ^ Johnson, Glen (November 11, 2011). "Massachusetts to hold rare Thursday primary election next year". The Boston Globe. Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ Massachusetts House Election Results 2012 - Map, District Results, Live Updates - POLITICO.com
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cassidy, Chris (November 7, 2011). "Redistricting throws U.S. Reps. Keating, Lynch into faceoff". Boston Herald. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  6. ^ Appleton, John (December 1, 2010). "Neal and Olver will seek re-election to Congress in 2012". The Republican. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Nuciforo renews plans for Congress". The Berkshire Eagle. October 27, 2011. Retrieved October 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "2 Mass. men announce plans for congressional runs". Boston Herald. Associated Press. January 17, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d "A list of winners in Massachusetts primary races". AP. Boston.com. September 7, 2012. Retrieved September 14, 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Return of Votes for Massachusetts State Elections, November 6, 2013". Secretary of State for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 23 November 2012. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i The totals do not include Blank/Scatterings Ballots although they were reported.
  12. ^ "Massachusetts congressman John Olver says he will retire at end of term". The Washington Post. October 26, 2011. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  13. ^ Storrow, Ben (December 2, 2011). "U.S. Rep. James McGovern begins wooing his potential constituents". Daily Hampshire Gazette. Retrieved February 23, 2012. 
  14. ^ Messenger, Brian (April 22, 2012). "Tsongas enjoys early fundraising lead over Golnik". The Eagle-Tribune. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  15. ^ Messenger, Brian (December 24, 2011). "Golnik looks for 2012 rematch with Tsongas". The Eagle-Tribune. Retrieved February 13, 2012. 
  16. ^ Sylvia, Andrew (February 23, 2012). "Westford Man Seeks Seat in Congress". Westford, MA Patch. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  17. ^ Taylor, Jessica (November 28, 2011). "Barney Frank Announces Retirement From Congress". National Journal. Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  18. ^ Graham, Melanie (February 14, 2012). "Former Frank Challenger Joins 2012 Race". Needham, MA Patch. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Democrat Robinson out of US Senate race". Associated Press. Retrieved December 16, 2011. 
  20. ^ Johnson, Glen; Andersen, Travis; Powers, Martine (February 16, 2012). "Joseph Kennedy III announces congressional campaign". The Boston Globe. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  21. ^ "GOP's Sean Bielat making 2nd bid for 4th congressional district seat". The Patriot Ledger. Associated Press. January 17, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2012. 
  22. ^ Downs, Andreae (September 9, 2011). "Brookline School Committee member readies run against Barney Frank". The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  23. ^ Richmod, Will (May 2, 2012). "Fall River dentist, Durfee grad David Steinhof to run for Congress". The Herald News. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  24. ^ Miller, Joshua (June 21, 2011). "Republican Announces Longshot Bid in Massachusetts". Roll Call. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  25. ^ "Letter to the Editor: Dembrowski Vying for 2012 7th Congressional District Post". Stoneham Patch. August 10, 2011. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  26. ^ "Tom Tierney wins 5th District GOP primary". Archived from the original on September 13, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2012. 
  27. ^ a b c Phillips, Frank; Bierman, Noah (November 8, 2011). "Map changes incumbents’ terrain". Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  28. ^ Levenson, Michael (March 2, 2011). "Tea Party candidate says he'll try to unseat US Rep. Tierney again". The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  29. ^ "Hudak withdraws from Sixth District race". The Daily Item. January 23, 2012. Retrieved January 23, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Massachusetts: Independent Seth Moulton Will Not Run". Roll Call. July 23, 2012. Retrieved October 8, 2014. 
  31. ^ Miller, Joshua (September 2, 2011). "Mike Capuano Won't Challenge Scott Brown, Seeking Re-election". Roll Call. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  32. ^ "Karla Romero for Congress". Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  33. ^ "Lynch out for meet-and-greet". Boston Globe. January 22, 2012. 
  34. ^ Encarnacao, Jack (February 4, 2012). "Iraq War vet from Quincy hopes to unseat U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch". The Patriot Ledger. Retrieved February 7, 2012. 
  35. ^ Richmond, Will (January 12, 2012). "Bristol County DA intends to seek 9th District seat in Congress". The Herald News. Retrieved February 7, 2012. 
  36. ^ a b Cassidy, Chris (November 13, 2011). "Battle lines drawn". Boston Herald. Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  37. ^ Richmond, Will (January 9, 2012). "Mayor Will Flanagan says he won't run for Congress". The Herald News. Retrieved January 11, 2012. 
  38. ^ Preer, Robert (January 29, 2012). "Redrawn district complicates Keating's bid for reelection". The Boston Globe. Retrieved February 23, 2012. 
  39. ^ Brennan, George (February 15, 2012). "O'Leary not running for Congressional seat". Cape Cod Times. Retrieved February 15, 2012. 
  40. ^ Brennan, George (April 21, 2012). "Chaprales eyes congressional seat". Cape Cod Times. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  41. ^ Richmond, Will (January 20, 2012). "A Plymouth Republican to join 9th Congressional district race". The Herald News. Retrieved January 20, 2012. 
  42. ^ a b c Brennan, George (November 9, 2011). "New Cape district fires up field, Republicans". Cape Cod Times. Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  43. ^ Tuoti, Gerry (January 8, 2012). "PARTY LINES: Kennedy may run for Congress". Taunton Daily Gazette. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 

External links[edit]


Preceded by
2010 elections
United States House elections in Massachusetts
2012
Succeeded by
2014 elections