Uzbekistani som

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For earlier currencies used in Uzbekistan, see Bukharan tenga, Kokand tenga and Khwarazmi tenga.
Uzbekistani som
O‘zbek so‘m / Ўзбек сўм (Uzbek)
25Som.jpg
25 som
ISO 4217 code UZS
Central bank Central Bank of the Republic of Uzbekistan
 Website www.cbu.uz
User(s) Uzbekistan Uzbekistan
Inflation 16%
 Source The World Factbook, 2011 est.
Subunit
 1/100 tiyin
Plural som
tiyin tiyin
Coins 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 som
Banknotes 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 5000 som

The som (Uzbek: so‘m in Latin script, сўм in Cyrillic script) is the currency of Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The ISO 4217 currency code is UZS.

Etymology[edit]

In the Soviet Union, speakers of Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Uzbek called the ruble the som, and this name appeared written on the back of banknotes, among the texts for the value of the bill in all 15 official languages of the Union. The word som (sometimes transliterated "sum" or "soum") means "pure" in Kyrgyz, Uyghur and Uzbek, as well as in many other Turkic languages. The word implies "pure gold"

First Som[edit]

Like other republics of the former Soviet Union, Uzbekistan continued using Soviet/Russian ruble after independence. On July 26, 1993, a new series of Russian ruble was issued and old Soviet/Russian ruble ceased to be legal tender in Russia.[1][2] Some successor states had their national currencies before the change, some chose to continue using the pre-1993 Soviet/Russian ruble, and some chose to use both the pre-1993 and the new Russian ruble. Tables of modern monetary history: Asia[3] implies that both old and new rubles were used in Uzbekistan.

Uzbekistan replaced the ruble with som at par in on November 15, 1993.[3] No subdivisions of this som were issued and only banknotes were produced, in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 5000, and 10000 som. Because it was meant to be a transitional currency, the design was rather simplistic. All notes had the Coat of arms on obverse, and Sher-Dor Madrasah of the Registan in Samarkand on reverse.[4] They only differ in color and value.

Second Som[edit]

500 Som

On July 1, 1994,[3] a second som was introduced at a rate of 1 new som = 1000 old som. This som is subdivided into 100 tiyin. At its introduction, 1 U.S. dollar was equal to 25 som. Currently, the largest denomination of Uzbek currency, the 1000 som bill, is worth approximately 60 cents U.S., requiring Uzbeks to carry enormous numbers of bills just to carry out grocery shopping and bill payment. Consequently the smallest denomination, the 1 tiyin, is only worth 1/1999 cents U.S. making it the "world's most worthless coin".[5]

The rampant inflation situation is considered a politically sensitive issue in Uzbekistan, which is why the Uzbek government is slow to acclimate the currency to the current value by issuing higher coin and note denominations. As a result, the current highest coin denomination in circulation is the 500 som while the highest banknote denomination is the 5000 som. Official state figures put inflation as of the first half of 2011 at 3.6%, however accurate numbers are pinned far higher.

Coins[edit]

2 series of coins have been issued for the second som. They can be easily distinguished by the script used for Uzbek. The first series was written in Cyrillic script, while the second series is written in Latin script.

First Series
Image Value Composition Description Date of minting
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse
[1] [2] 1 tiyin Brass clad steel Coat of arms with 12 stars
State title
Value, year of minting 1994
[3] [4] 3 tiyin
[5] [6] 5 tiyin
[7] [8] 10 tiyin Nickel clad steel Coat of arms with 12 stars
State title
Value, year of minting 1994
[9] [10] 20 tiyin
[11] [12] 50 tiyin
[13] [14] 1 som 1997, 1998, 1999
[15] [16] 5 som 1997, 1998, 1999
[17] [18] 10 som 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000
For table standards, see the coin specification table.
Second Series
Image Value Technical parameters Description Date of minting
Diameter Mass Composition Edge Obverse Reverse
1 Som UZ 2000.png 1 som 18.4 mm 2.83 g Stainless steel Reeded Coat of arms without stars
Bank title, year of minting
Value, map of Uzbekistan 2000
5 som 21.2 mm 3.35 g Brass clad steel Plain Coat of arms without stars
Bank title, year of minting
Value, map of Uzbekistan 2001
Uzbekistani 10-Som coin from 2002 (both sides).jpg 10 som 19.75 mm 2.71 g Nickel clad steel Plain Coat of arms without stars
Bank title, year of minting
Value, map of Uzbekistan 2001
UZB-25s.jpg 25 som 27 mm Coat of arms without stars
State title, year of minting
Value, Jalal ad-Din Mingburnu 1999
50Som2001.jpg 50 som 26.1 mm 8 g Plain and reeded sections Coat of arms without stars
Bank title, year of minting
Value, map of Uzbekistan 20011
50 som 26.1 mm 7.9 g Value, statue and ruin of Shahrisabz 20022
100som.jpg 100 som 26.9 mm 7.9 g Inscription Coat of arms without stars
Bank title, year of minting
Value, map of Uzbekistan, sunrays 20043
These images are to scale at 2.5 pixels per millimetre. For table standards, see the coin specification table.

Note[edit]

Banknotes[edit]

The first banknotes were issued by the State Bank of Uzbekistan in 1993. All of the denominations share the same designs: the Coat of arms of Uzbekistan on the front and the Medressa on Reghistan Square in Samarkand. The second and current series, issued by the Central Bank of the Republic of Uzberkistan, were released in 1994 in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 som. A 200 som banknote was issued in 1997, the 500 som in 1999, the 1000 som in 2001 and the 5000 som banknote was issued on July 1, 2013.

1994-2013 Series[6]
Image Value Main Colour Description Date of printing
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse
UZS1 1994 front.jpg UZS1 1994 back.jpg 1 som Green and pink Coat of arms Alisher Navoi Opera and Ballet Theater in Tashkent 1994
UZS3 1994 front.jpg UZS3 1994 back.jpg 3 som Red Mosque of Çaçma Ayub Mazar in Bukhara
UZS5 1994 front.jpg UZS5 1994 back.jpg 5 som Blue and orange Coat of arms and Islamic pattern Ali Shir Nawai Monument in Tashkent
UZS10 1994 front.jpg UZS10 1994 back.jpg 10 som Purple Gur-e Amir in Samarkand
UZS25 1994 front.jpg UZS25 1994 back.jpg 25 som Blue and pink The Mausoleum of Kazi Zade Rumi in the Shah-i-Zinda complex in Samarkand
UZS50 1994 front.jpg UZS50 1994 back.jpg 50 som Brown The three Madrasahs of the Registan in Samarkand
UZS100 1994 front.jpg UZS100 1994 back.jpg 100 som Purple Bunyodkor Palace in Tashkent
UZS200 1997 front.jpg UzbekistanP80-200sum-1997-donatedoy b.jpg 200 som Green Coat of arms Detail of a tiger mosaiс on the Sher-Dor Madrasah at the Registan in Samarkand 1997
UZS500 1999 front.jpg UzbekistanP81-500sum-1999-donatedoy b.jpg 500 som Red and some green Statue of Timur in Tashkent 1999
UZS1000 2001 front.jpg UZS1000 2001 back.jpg 1000 som Grey Amir Timur Museum in Tashkent 2001
UZS5000 2013 front.jpg UZS5000 2013 rear.jpg 5000 som Green National Assembly (Oliy Majlis) in Tashkent 2013
Current UZS exchange rates
From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD RUB CNY
From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD RUB CNY
From XE.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD RUB CNY
From OANDA.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD RUB CNY
From fxtop.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD RUB CNY

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Old som
Preceded by:
Soviet/Russian ruble
Reason: independence
Ratio: at par
Currency of Uzbekistan
November 15, 1993 – July 1, 1994
Succeeded by:
New som
Reason: inflation and depreciation of the "transitional" currency
Ratio: 1 new som = 1000 old som
New som
Preceded by:
Old som
Reason: inflation and depreciation of the "transitional" currency
Ratio: 1 new som = 1000 old som
Currency of Uzbekistan
July 1, 1994 –
Succeeded by:
Current