What More Can I Say

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"What More Can I Say"
Song by Jay-Z from the album The Black Album
Released November 4, 2003
Format Digital download
Recorded 2003
Genre Hip hop
Length 4:55
Label Roc-A-Fella, Def Jam
Writer Shawn Carter, Thomas Bell, Roland Chambers, Kenneth Gamble
Producer The Buchanans
The Black Album track listing
"December 4th"
(2)
"What More Can I Say"
(3)
"Encore"
(4)

"What More Can I Say" is a song from rap artist Jay-Z's studio album The Black Album. It was released as a street single simultaneously as the official single "Change Clothes". It premiered on Hot 97 on October 22, 2003 and was the first track from The Black Album to be heard by the public[citation needed]. The song includes additional vocals from Vincent "Hum V" Bostic and was produced by The Buchanans.

The intro has a sampled monologue by Russell Crowe from the film Gladiator, the song also samples "Something for Nothing" by MFSB from their self-titled album released in 1973. This sample prompted Jay-Z to quote a The Notorious B.I.G. lyric as he was featured on that song.

The quote appears immediately after the song addresses accusations of Jay-Z stealing lyrics from The Notorious B.I.G.[citation needed]. Busta Rhymes is mentioned in the song with Jay-Z stating that his isn't "animated, like say a, Busta Rhymes".

The song was sampled by T.I. in his song "Bring Em Out".

On The Grey Album, What More Can I Say is mashed up with The Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps"

Rapper Tyler, The Creator of OFWGKTA sampled it in his song "Jack And The Beanstalk" from his 2009 album "Bastard"

The song "Otis" from the collaboration album, Watch the Throne by Kanye West and Jay-Z carries the following line "What more can I say?". It samples "Top Billin'" from American hip-hop duo Audio Two

Memphis Bleek raps the line of the song "Do My..." which was released in the opening track featuring labelmate Jay-Z which he also sampled three years later from 2000's The Understanding.

Used as the outro to Sway Calloway's radio show Sway in the Morning on Shade 45.

See also[edit]