1935 NSWRFL season

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1935 New South Wales Rugby Football League
Teams 9
Premiers Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Eastern Suburbs (5th title)
Minor premiers Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Eastern Suburbs (6th title)
Matches played 75
Top points scorer(s) Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Dave Brown (244)
Top try-scorer(s) Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Dave Brown (38)

The 1935 New South Wales Rugby Football League premiership was the twenty-eighth season of Sydney’s top-grade rugby league club competition, Australia’s first. The season culminated in Eastern Suburbs’ victory over South Sydney in the final.[1]

Teams[edit]

The addition of Canterbury-Bankstown meant that the League involved nine clubs for the first time since 1929.[2]

Records set in 1935[edit]

The University club did not win a single match in 1935, continuing a losing streak that started in round 2, 1934 and which would run till round 14, 1936, and which marks the most consecutive losses in NSWRL/NRL premiership history at 42.[3]

On 11 May at Earl Park, St. George defeated newcomers Canterbury 91–6, this remaining the biggest winning margin and most points scored by one team in the history of the NSWRFL/NSWRL/ARL/NRL, beating South Sydney’s 67–nil win over Western Suburbs in 1910.[4] The following weekend on 18 May, Eastern Suburbs defeated the “Cantabs” (as Canterbury were initially known) 87–7, this remaining the second-highest score and winning margin in the history of the competition.[4] The record in any grade occurred on 19 July 1913 when South Sydney reserves defeated Mosman by 102 points to 2.[5][6]

In the second half of the Earl Park match, St. George scored fourteen tries and sixty-eight points, this being the most scored in one half of any match.[7]

Eastern Suburbs winger Rod O'Loan scored a club record of seven tries in a 61–5 win over University. This tally stands second (behind Frank Burge's eight tries in 1920) on the list of most individual tries in a premiership match. Dave Brown’s six tries in a 1935 game against Canterbury stands in equal third place in that same list, Easts winning the match 65–10.[8]

The standing record for most tries in one season also comes from 1935, being 38 by Brown.[9] Brown’s 45 points in the 87–7 victory against Canterbury also stands as the record for most points in a match and the 15 goals he kicked in that match stands in equal first place as the most goals scored in a match. The other equal place holder is St George’s Les Griffen who kicked 15 goals in the Dragons’ 91–6 victory against Canterbury.[citation needed]

Dave Brown’s season tally of 244 points stood for 34 years as the record points scored in a season until topped by Eric Simms in 1969.

Ladder[edit]

The geographical locations of the teams that contested the 1935 premiership across Sydney.
Team Pld W D L B PF PA PD Pts
1 Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Eastern Suburbs 16 15 0 1 2 599 157 +442 34
2 South Sydney colours.svg South Sydney 16 11 0 5 2 314 222 +112 26
3 Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs 16 10 0 6 2 345 243 +102 24
4 North Sydney colours.svg North Sydney 16 9 1 6 2 248 253 -5 23
5 Balmain colours.svg Balmain 16 8 1 7 2 320 225 +95 21
6 St. George colours.svg St. George 16 8 0 8 2 334 162 +172 20
7 Newtown colours.svg Newtown 16 8 0 8 2 280 248 +32 20
8 Canterbury colours.svg Canterbury-Bankstown 16 2 0 14 2 150 660 -510 8
9 University colours.svg University 16 0 0 16 2 109 529 -420 4

Finals[edit]

In the two semi-finals played as a double-header at the Sydney Cricket Ground on the same day, the top two ranked teams Eastern Suburbs and South Sydney beat their lower-ranked opponents Western Suburbs and North Sydney. Eastern Suburbs and South Sydney won their respective matches and met each other in the Final.

Semi-finals Final
7 September 1935 – Sydney Cricket Ground
  Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Eastern Suburbs 15  
  Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs 10  
 
14 September 1935 – Sydney Cricket Ground
      Eastern Suburbs colours.svg Eastern Suburbs 19
    South Sydney colours.svg South Sydney 3
7 September 1935 – Sydney Cricket Ground
  South Sydney colours.svg South Sydney 14
  North Sydney colours.svg North Sydney 10  

Premiership Final[edit]

South Sydney Position Eastern Suburbs
Les McDonald FB Tom Dowling
Harry Thompson WG Rod O’Loan
Harry Eyers CE Ross McKinnon
Eddie Finucane CE Jack Beaton
George Shankland WG Fred Tottey
"Paddy" Stewart FE Ernie Norman
Percy Williams(c) HB Viv Thicknesse
Jack McCormack PR Ray Stehr (c)
George Kilham HK Tom McLachlan
Eric Lewis PR Max Nixon
Frank Curran SR Harry Pierce
Michael Williams SR Joe Pearce
Eddie Hinson LK Andy Norval
Dave Watson Coach Arthur Halloway

Before a crowd of 22,106 and refereed by Tom McMahon, Easts led 9–nil at half-time and were never headed despite being without their record-breaking centre, Dave Brown.[10]

Scorers[edit]

  • Eastern Suburbs

Tries: Rod O'Loan 2, Harry Pierce, Fred Tottey, Jack Beaton. Goals: Ross McKinnon 2

  • South Sydney

Try: George Shankland

Source:[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Premiership Roll of Honour at rl1908.com
  2. ^ "History of the Premiership". centenaryofrugbyleague.com.au. Australian Rugby League. Retrieved 21 October 2013. [dead link]
  3. ^ Rugby League Tables – Most Consecutive Games Lost; AFl Tables
  4. ^ a b Rugby League Tables – Game Records; AFL Tables
  5. ^ ‘Rugby League: Second Grade‘; The Sunday Times, 20 July 1913, p. 13
  6. ^ ‘Records Made: St. George and Griffen’; Sydney Morning Herald, 13 May 1935, p. 17
  7. ^ See Middleton, David; Rugby League 1996; pp. 123, 125 ISBN 0732256720
  8. ^ Rugby League Tables – Most Individual Tries in a Game; AFL Tables
  9. ^ Middleton, David (30 September 2013). "Ten of the most dominant seasons in rugby league history from historian David Middleton". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 6 February 2014. 
  10. ^ "The Rugby Season has ended". The Sydney Mail. Australia. 1935-09-18. p. 33. Retrieved 2009-12-04. [dead link]
  11. ^ "Finals Scorers,1935". stats.rleague.com. Archived from the original on 19 October 2012. Retrieved 29 October 2013. 

External links[edit]