1968 United States presidential election in Maryland

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United States presidential election in Maryland, 1968

← 1964 November 5, 1968 1972 →
  Hubert Humphrey crop.jpg Richard Nixon portrait.jpg George C Wallace.jpg
Nominee Hubert Humphrey Richard Nixon George Wallace
Party Democratic Republican American Independent
Home state Minnesota New York[b] Alabama
Running mate Edmund Muskie Spiro Agnew Marvin Griffin[a]
Electoral vote 10 0 0
Popular vote 538,310 517,995 178,734
Percentage 43.59% 41.94% 14.47%

Maryland Presidential Election Results 1968.svg
County results

President before election

Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic

Elected President

Richard Nixon
Republican

The United States presidential election in Maryland, 1968 was held on November 5th, 1968. Hubert Humphrey won the state by 20,315 votes against Richard Nixon and by 359,576 votes against George Wallace.[1]

Maryland was the home state of Republican vice presidential nominee Spiro Agnew, who was the sitting Governor of Maryland at the time of the election.

Results[edit]

1968 United States presidential election in Maryland[1]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Hubert Humphrey Edmund Muskie 538,310 43.59% 10
Democratic Richard Nixon Spiro Agnew 517,995 41.94% 0
American Independent George Wallace Marvin Griffin[a] 178,734 14.47% 0

By county[edit]

County Humphrey% Humphrey# Nixon% Nixon# Wallace% Wallace# Total
Allegany 41.45% 13,227 42.50% 13,561 16.05% 5,122 26,788
Anne Arundel 32.70% 25,381 47.09% 36,557 20.21% 15,687 61,938
Baltimore 36.89% 80,798 49.74% 108,930 13.37% 29,283 189,728
Calvert 37.29% 2,032 35.71% 1,946 27.00% 1,471 3,978
Caroline 27.23% 1,697 50.07% 3,120 22.69% 1,414 4,817
Carroll 23.73% 4,658 60.56% 11,888 15.71% 3,085 16,546
Cecil 31.78% 4,517 45.46% 6,462 22.76% 3,235 10,979
Charles 35.20% 4,247 38.50% 4,645 26.30% 3,173 8,892
Dorchester 26.83% 2,714 41.36% 4,183 31.81% 3,217 6,897
Frederick 31.60% 8,316 51.87% 13,649 16.52% 4,348 21,965
Garrett 28.54% 1,933 59.38% 4,021 12.08% 818 5,954
Harford 32.30% 9,914 51.48% 15,799 16.22% 4,978 25,713
Howard 31.08% 5,752 53.81% 9,957 15.11% 2,796 15,709
Kent 35.41% 2,243 46.50% 2,946 18.09% 1,146 5,189
Montgomery 48.08% 92,026 44.23% 84,651 7.69% 14,726 176,677
Prince George's 40.26% 71,524 41.24% 73,269 18.50% 32,867 144,793
Queen Anne's 31.99% 1,969 46.92% 2,888 21.09% 1,298 4,857
Saint Mary's 35.75% 3,280 36.49% 3,348 27.76% 2,547 6,628
Somerset 32.91% 2,319 40.14% 2,829 26.95% 1,899 5,148
Talbot 29.37% 2,609 55.18% 4,902 15.45% 1,372 7,511
Washington 33.08% 11,266 47.13% 16,050 19.78% 6,737 27,316
Wicomico 29.22% 5,392 47.18% 8,707 23.60% 4,356 14,099
Worcester 27.43% 2,046 47.48% 3,541 25.09% 1,871 5,587
Baltimore City 61.56% 178,450 27.65% 80,146 10.79% 31,288 258,596

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Maryland Manual 1969–1970. The Hall of Records Commission of the State of Maryland. p. 473. Retrieved May 12, 2019.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Though Curtis LeMay was Wallace's official running mate, Griffin's name was on the Maryland ballot.
  2. ^ Although he was born in California and he served as a U.S. Senator from California, in 1968 Richard Nixon’s official state of residence was New York, because he moved there to practice law after his defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial election. During his first term as president, Nixon re-established his residency in California. Consequently, most reliable reference books list Nixon's home state as New York in the 1968 election and his home state as California in the 1972 (and 1960) election.