1993 Women's Cricket World Cup

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1993 Women's World Cup
1993 Women's Cricket World Cup logo.png
Dates 20 July – 1 August 1993
Administrator(s) IWCC
Cricket format ODI (60-over)
Tournament format(s) Round-robin
Playoffs
Host(s)  England
Champions  England (2nd title)
Participants 8
Matches played 29
Most runs England Jan Brittin (416)
Most wickets England Karen Smithies
New Zealand Julie Harris (15)
1988
1997

The 1993 Women's Cricket World Cup was an international cricket tournament played in England from 20 July to 1 August 1993. Hosted by England for the second time, it was the fifth edition of the Women's Cricket World Cup, and came over four years after the preceding 1988 World Cup in Australia.

The tournament was organised by the International Women's Cricket Council (IWCC), with matches played over 60 overs. It was "run on a shoestring", and was close to being cancelled until a £90,000 donation was received from the Foundation for Sport and the Arts.[1] England won the tournament for a second time, defeating New Zealand in the final by 67 runs. A record eight teams participated, with Denmark, India, and the West Indies joining the five teams from the 1988 edition. Denmark and the West Indies were making their tournament debuts.[a] England's Jan Brittin led the tournament in runs, while her captain Karen Smithies and New Zealand's Julie Harris led the tournament in wickets.[4][5]

Squads[edit]

 Australia[6]
Coach: Peter Bakker
 Denmark[7]
Coach: Erik Juul Lassen
 England[8]
Coach: Ruth Prideaux
 India[9]
 Ireland[10]
Coach: Brendan O'Brien
 Netherlands[11]  New Zealand[12]
Coach: Ann McKenna
 West Indies[13]
Coach: Theo Cuffy

Venues[edit]

Warm-up matches[edit]

Eleven warm-up matches were played against various English teams, all before the beginning of the tournament.[14]

Group stage[edit]

Points table[edit]

Team Pld W L T NR Pts RR
 New Zealand 7 7 0 0 0 28 3.202
 England 7 6 1 0 0 24 3.382
 Australia 7 5 2 0 0 20 3.147
 India 7 4 3 0 0 16 2.544
 Ireland 7 2 5 0 0 8 2.607
 West Indies 7 2 5 0 0 8 2.270
 Denmark 7 1 6 0 0 4 1.926
 Netherlands 7 1 6 0 0 4 1.791
Source: CricketArchive
  • Note: run rate was used as a tiebreaker in the case of teams finishing on an equal number of points, rather than net run rate (as is now common).[15]

Matches[edit]

The opening ceremony for the World Cup was held at The Oval on 13 July, with Sir Colin Cowdrey, the chairman of the International Cricket Council (ICC), opening the event.[16]

20 July
Scorecard
Netherlands 
53 (49.3 overs)
v
 Australia
56/0 (16.5 overs)
Australia won by 10 wickets
Walton Lea Road, Warrington, Cheshire
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bat.

20 July
Scorecard
England 
286/3 (60 overs)
v
 Denmark
47 (33.5 overs)
England won by 239 runs
Recreation Ground, Banstead, Surrey
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bowl.

20 July
Scorecard
India 
155/5 (52.3 overs)
v
 West Indies
92 (48.4 overs)
  • India won the toss and elected to bat.
  • The match was reduced to 52.3 overs per side before the start of play.

20 July
Scorecard
Ireland 
82/6 (39 overs)
v
 New Zealand
83/3 (19.3 overs)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets
Denis Compton Oval, Shenley, Hertfordshire
  • Ireland won the toss and elected to bat.
  • The match was reduced to 39 overs per side before the start of play.

21 July
Scorecard
India 
108 (58.4 overs)
v
 Australia
114/3 (38.3 overs)
Australia won by 7 wickets
Harewood Road, Collingham, Yorkshire
  • India won the toss and elected to bat.

21 July
Scorecard
Ireland 
234/6 (60 overs)
v
 Denmark
164/9 (60 overs)
Ireland won by 70 runs
Christ Church Ground, Oxford, Oxfordshire
Player of the match: Miriam Grealey (Ire)
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bowl.

21 July
Scorecard
New Zealand 
127 (54.5 overs)
v
 England
102 (57.2 overs)
  • England won the toss and elected to bowl.

21 July
Scorecard
Netherlands 
158 (59.5 overs)
v
 West Indies
88 (45.4 overs)
Netherlands won by 70 runs
Willow Lane, Meir Heath, Staffordshire
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bat.

24 July
Scorecard
West Indies 
131/8 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
133/2 (29.5 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
Nevill Ground, Tunbridge Wells, Kent
  • West Indies won the toss and elected to bat.

24 July
Scorecard
Denmark 
93 (58.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
94/1 (17.5 overs)
New Zealand won by 9 wickets
Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bat.

24 July
Scorecard
England 
259/4 (60 overs)
v
 Ireland
80/9 (56 overs)
England won on faster scoring rate
Sonning Lane, Reading, Berkshire
  • Ireland won the toss and elected to bowl.
  • Ireland's target was 242 runs in 56 overs.

24 July
Scorecard
India 
93/4 (35 overs)
v
 Netherlands
76 (34.1 overs)
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bowl.
  • The match was restricted to 35 overs per side before the start of play.

25 July
Scorecard
Australia 
194/8 (60 overs)
v
 Ireland
145/5 (60 overs)
  • Australia won the toss and elected to bat.

25 July
Scorecard
West Indies 
120 (45.3 overs)
v
 Denmark
76 (51.2 overs)
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bowl.

25 July
Scorecard
England 
179 (50.5 overs)
v
 India
176 (59.5 overs)
England won by 3 runs
Memorial Ground, Finchampstead, Berkshire
  • India won the toss and elected to bowl.

25 July
Scorecard
Netherlands 
40 (54.2 overs)
v
 New Zealand
41/0 (13.2 overs)
New Zealand won by 10 wickets
Lindfield Common, Lindfield, Sussex
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bat.

26 July
Scorecard
Denmark 
152/7 (60 overs)
v
 Netherlands
122 (55.1 overs)
Denmark won by 30 runs
Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bat.

26 July
Scorecard
England 
208/5 (60 overs)
v
 Australia
165 (53.5 overs)
England won by 43 runs
Woodbridge Road, Guildford, Surrey
  • England won the toss and elected to bat.

26 July
Scorecard
Ireland 
151 (58.4 overs)
v
 India
152/6 (57.3 overs)
India won by 4 wickets
Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire
  • India won the toss and elected to bowl.

26 July
Scorecard
West Indies 
96 (57.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
97/3 (26.4 overs)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets
Civil Service Sports Ground, Chiswick, Greater London
  • West Indies won the toss and elected to bat.

28 July
Scorecard
Denmark 
76 (54 overs)
v
 Australia
77/3 (8.5 overs)
Australia won by 7 wickets
Honor Oak Cricket Club, Dulwich, Greater London
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bat.

28 July
Scorecard
West Indies 
120 (59.4 overs)
v
 England
123/6 (46.1 overs)
England won by 4 wickets
Arundel Castle Cricket Ground, Arundel, Sussex
  • England won the toss and elected to bowl.

28 July
Scorecard
New Zealand 
154/8 (60 overs)
v
 India
112 (54.3 overs)
New Zealand won by 42 runs
Corfton Road, Ealing, Greater London
  • New Zealand won the toss and elected to bat.

28 July
Scorecard
Netherlands 
134/8 (60 overs)
v
 Ireland
136/8 (56.3 overs)
Ireland won by 2 wickets
Pound Lane, Marlow, Buckinghamshire
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bat.

29 July
Scorecard
Australia 
77 (51.3 overs)
v
 New Zealand
78/0 (18.2 overs)
New Zealand won by 10 wickets
Midland Bank Sports Ground, Beckenham, Greater London
  • Australia won the toss and elected to bat.

29 July
Scorecard
Denmark 
116 (57.5 overs)
v
 India
117/1 (40.5 overs)
India won by 9 wickets
Chalvey Road, Slough, Buckinghamshire
  • Denmark won the toss and elected to bat.

29 July
Scorecard
England 
207/5 (60 overs)
v
 Netherlands
74 (53.5 overs)
England won by 133 runs
Corfton Road, Ealing, Greater London
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bowl.

29 July
Scorecard
West Indies 
208/6 (60 overs)
v
 Ireland
189/8 (60 overs)
West Indies won by 19 runs
Pixham Lane, Dorking, Surrey
  • Ireland won the toss and elected to bowl.

Final[edit]

The final at Lord's was attended by 4,500 spectators, including the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, John Major. The match was broadcast live on BBC's Grandstand, and England's victory received front-page and back-page coverage in all of the major national newspapers, a first for women's cricket.[1] England's performance was often contrasted with that of the English men's side, which had lost the 1993 Ashes series to Australia less than a week earlier. The Women's Cricket Association (WCA) was praised for its management of the final, but the increased media coverage also led to some criticism of its role in the sport as a whole.[17]

1 August
Scorecard
England 
195/5 (60 overs)
v
 New Zealand
128 (55.1 overs)
Jan Brittin 48 (117)
Sarah McLauchlan 2/25 (10 overs)
Maia Lewis 28 (87)
Gillian Smith 3/29 (12 overs)
England won by 67 runs
Lord's Cricket Ground, London
Player of the match: Jo Chamberlain (Eng)
  • England won the toss and elected to bat.

Statistics[edit]

Most runs[edit]

The top five runscorers are included in this table, ranked by runs scored, then by batting average, then alphabetically by surname.

Player Team Runs Inns Avg Highest 100s 50s
Jan Brittin  England 410 8 51.25 104 2 1
Carole Hodges  England 334 8 47.71 113 2 0
Helen Plimmer  England 242 7 34.57 118 1 1
Sandhya Agarwal  India 229 7 45.80 58* 0 2
Debbie Hockley  New Zealand 229 8 45.80 53* 0 1

Source: CricketArchive

Most wickets[edit]

The top five wickettakers are listed in this table, ranked by wickets taken and then by bowling average.

Player Team Overs Wkts Ave SR Econ BBI
Karen Smithies  England 77.0 15 7.93 30.80 1.54 3/6
Julie Harris  New Zealand 77.3 15 9.33 31.00 1.80 3/5
Gillian Smith  England 58.2 14 9.50 25.00 2.28 5/30
Diana Edulji  India 75.3 14 10.35 32.35 1.92 4/12
Clare Taylor  England 87.5 14 11.42 37.64 1.82 4/13

Source: CricketArchive

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago had fielded separate teams at the inaugural 1973 World Cup, but a combined West Indian team had not previously participated.[2] India had been invited to the 1988 World Cup, but had to withdraw after failing to secure sponsorship money.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Raf Nicholson (4 November 2014). "Flashback: England's women upset the odds" – All Out Cricket. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  2. ^ Women's World Cup 1973 table – CricketArchive. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  3. ^ Mary Boson. "A worldly ambition for the world's best" – The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 October 1988.
  4. ^ Batting at Women's World Cup 1993 (ordered by runs) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  5. ^ Bowling at Women's World Cup 1993 (ordered by wickets) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  6. ^ Batting and fielding for Australia women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  7. ^ Batting and fielding for Denmark women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  8. ^ Batting and fielding for England women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  9. ^ Batting and fielding for India women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  10. ^ Batting and fielding for Ireland women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  11. ^ Batting and fielding for Netherlands women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  12. ^ Batting and fielding for New Zealand women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  13. ^ Batting and fielding for West Indies women, Women's World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  14. ^ World Cup 1993 – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  15. ^ Women's World Cup 1993 table – CricketArchive. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  16. ^ "Famous setting for opening of women's cricket World Cup" – The Times, 14 July 1993.
  17. ^ Daniel Grummitt (28 January 2013). "Women's World Cup History - England 1993" – CricketWorld. Retrieved 30 August 2015.