2004 Rugby League Tri-Nations

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2004 (2004) Tri-Nations  ()
2004 Tri-Nations logo
Number of teams 3
Host country  United Kingdom
Winner  Australia (2nd title)

Matches played 7
Attendance 182,288 (26,041 per match)
Tries scored 47 (6.71 per match)
Top scorer Australia Darren Lockyer[1] (28)
Top try scorer Australia Luke Rooney[1] (6)
 < 1999
2005

The second Rugby League Tri-Nations tournament (known as the Gillette Tri-Nations due to sponsorship[2]) was contested between 16 October and 27 November of 2004. The format of the competition differed from the previous event in that the teams played each other twice, rather than once, prior to the final.

The tournament final of the tournament was predicted by some to be a close affair, with the British team heralded as slight favourites after finishing at the top of the league table. Instead, it was a one-sided match as Australia produced their best performance of the tournament. The game was effectively over by half-time when Australia led by 38-0.

Participating teams[edit]

Each team was to play the other three twice during the round robin tournament. The top two finishing teams would then contest the final.

Team Nickname Coach Captain RLIF Rank
Australia Australia The Kangaroos Wayne Bennett Darren Lockyer 1
New Zealand New Zealand The Kiwis Daniel Anderson Ruben Wiki 2
United Kingdom Great Britain The Lions Brian Noble Andy Farrell 3

Officials[edit]

One referee from each participating nation was appointed to control matches in the Tri-Nations:

Venues[edit]

The games were played at the following venues in New Zealand and England. The tournament final was played in Leeds.

Leeds Auckland London Manchester
Elland Road North Harbour Stadium Loftus Road City of Manchester Stadium
Capacity: 37,890 Capacity: 25,000 Capacity: 18,439 Capacity: 47,726
East Stand at Elland Road prior to the 2010 World Club Challenge.jpg North harbour stadium.JPG Loftus Road 5.jpg City of Manchester Stadium East Stand.jpg
Huddersfield Wigan Hull
Galpharm Stadium JJB Stadium KC Stadium
Capacity: 24,500 Capacity: 25,138 Capacity: 25,400
Galpharm Stadium - geograph.org.uk - 312658.jpg England v France 2013 RLWC (1).jpg KC Stadium before Hull v Burnley.jpg

Results[edit]

Tournament matches[edit]

Saturday, 16 October
New Zealand  16 – 16  Australia
Tries:
Vinnie Anderson
Louis Anderson
Francis Meli
Goals:
Brent Webb 2/3
Report Tries:
Luke Rooney (2)
Anthony Minichiello
Goals:
Darren Lockyer 2/3
North Harbour Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 19,118[1]
Referee: Russel Smith England


NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Francis Meli · 3. Nigel Vagana · 4. Paul Whatuira · 5. Matt Utai · 6. Vinnie Anderson · 7. Thomas Leuluai · 8. Jason Cayless · 9. Louis Anderson · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. Tony Puletua · 12. Joe Galuvao · 13. Sonny Bill Williams
Interchange: 14. Motu Tony · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Nathan Cayless · 17. David Kidwell
Coach: Daniel Anderson

AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Luke Rooney · 3. Shaun Berrigan · 4. Willie Tonga · 5. Matt Sing · 6. Darren Lockyer (c) · 7. Craig Gower · 8. Shane Webcke · 9. Danny Buderus · 10. Jason Ryles · 11. Willie Mason · 12. Nathan Hindmarsh · 13. Tonie Carroll
Interchange: 14. Craig Wing · 15. Petero Civoniceva · 16. Ben Kennedy · 17. Andrew Ryan
Coach: Wayne Bennett


Saturday, 23 October
Australia  32 – 12  New Zealand
Tries:
Luke Rooney
Darren Lockyer
Willie Tonga
Shaun Berrigan
Petero Civoniceva
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (3/4)
Darren Lockyer (2/2)
Shaun Berrigan (1/1)
Report Tries:
Brent Webb
Lesley Vainikolo
Vinnie Anderson
Goals:
Brent Webb (0/3)
Loftus Road, London
Attendance: 16,725[1]
Referee: Russel Smith England


AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Luke Rooney · 3. Shaun Berrigan · 4. Willie Tonga · 5. Matt Sing · 6. Darren Lockyer (c) · 7. Craig Gower · 8. Shane Webcke · 9. Danny Buderus · 10. Jason Ryles · 11. Craig Fitzgibbon · 12. Nathan Hindmarsh · 13. Tonie Carroll
Interchange: 14. Craig Wing · 15. Petero Civoniceva · 16. Willie Mason · 17. Shaun Timmins
Coach: Wayne Bennett

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Francis Meli · 3. Nigel Vagana · 4. Paul Whatuira · 5. Lesley Vainikolo · 6. Vinnie Anderson · 7. Thomas Leuluai · 8. Jason Cayless · 9. Louis Anderson · 10. Nathan Cayless · 11. Logan Swann · 12. Ruben Wiki (c) · 13. Sonny Bill Williams
Interchange: 14. Robbie Paul · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Paul Rauhihi · 17. David Kidwell
Coach: Daniel Anderson


Saturday, 30 October
Australia  12 – 8  Great Britain
Tries:
Willie Mason
Luke Rooney (2)
Goals:
Brett Kimmorley (0/3)
Report Tries:
Martin Gleeson
Brian Carney
Goals:
Andy Farrell (0/2)
City of Manchester Stadium, Manchester
Attendance: 38,572[1]
Referee: Glen Black New Zealand


AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Luke Rooney · 3. Shaun Berrigan · 4. Willie Tonga · 5. Matt Sing · 6. Craig Gower · 7. Brett Kimmorley · 8. Shane Webcke · 9. Danny Buderus (c) · 10. Jason Ryles · 11. Andrew Ryan · 12. Nathan Hindmarsh · 13. Tonie Carroll
Interchange: 14. Craig Wing · 15. Petero Civoniceva · 16. Willie Mason · 17. Shaun Timmins
Coach: Wayne Bennett

GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Stuart Reardon · 6. Paul Sculthorpe · 7. Sean Long · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Terry Newton · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock · 12. Andy Farrell (c) · 13. Gareth Ellis
Interchange: 14. Chev Walker · 15. Stephen Wild · 16. Ryan Bailey · 17. Danny McGuire
Coach: Brian Noble


Saturday, 6 November
Great Britain  22 – 12  New Zealand
Tries:
Terry Newton
Stuart Reardon (2)
Goals:
Andy Farrell (2/2)
Iestyn Harris (2/2)
Paul Sculthorpe (1/3)
Report Tries:
Ali Lauitiiti
Sonny Bill Williams
Goals:
Brent Webb (2/2)
Galpharm Stadium, Huddersfield
Attendance: 20,372[1]
Referee: Tim Mander Australia


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Stuart Reardon · 6. Danny McGuire · 7. Sean Long · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Terry Newton · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock · 12. Andy Farrell (c) · 13. Paul Sculthorpe
Interchange: 14. Gareth Ellis · 15. Ryan Bailey · 16. Paul Johnson · 17. Iestyn Harris
Coach: Brian Noble

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Francis Meli · 3. Nigel Vagana · 4. Clinton Toopi · 5. Shontayne Hape · 6. Vinnie Anderson · 7. Thomas Leuluai · 8. Jason Cayless · 9. Louis Anderson · 10. Ruben Wiki (c) · 11. Logan Swann · 12. David Kidwell · 13. Sonny Bill Williams
Interchange: 14. Robbie Paul · 15. Nathan Cayless · 16. Paul Rauhihi · 17. Ali Lauitiiti
Coach: Daniel Anderson


Saturday, 13 November
Great Britain  24 – 12  Australia
Tries:
Terry Newton
Stuart Reardon
Stuart Fielden
Keith Senior
Goals:
Andy Farrell (4/4)
Report Tries:
Luke Rooney
Mark O'Meley
Goals:
Craig Fitzgibbon (1/1)
Brett Kimmorley (1/1)
JJB Stadium, Wigan
Attendance: 25,004[1]
Referee: Glen Black New Zealand


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Stuart Reardon · 6. Danny McGuire · 7. Sean Long · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Terry Newton · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Jamie Peacock · 12. Andy Farrell (c) · 13. Paul Sculthorpe
Interchange: 14. Gareth Ellis · 15. Ryan Bailey · 16. Paul Johnson · 17. Iestyn Harris
Coach: Brian Noble

AUSTRALIA
1. Anthony Minichiello · 2. Matt Sing · 3. Shaun Berrigan · 4. Willie Tonga · 5. Luke Rooney · 6. Scott Hill · 7. Brett Kimmorley · 8. Shane Webcke · 9. Danny Buderus (c) · 10. Petero Civoniceva · 11. Craig Fitzgibbon · 12. Nathan Hindmarsh · 13. Tonie Carroll
Interchange: 14. Craig Wing · 15. Andrew Ryan · 16. Willie Mason · 17. Mark O'Meley
Coach: Wayne Bennett


Saturday, 20 November
Great Britain  26 – 24  New Zealand
Tries:
Keith Senior
Brian Carney (2)
Andy Farrell
Paul Johnson
Goals:
Andy Farrell (3/5)
Report Tries:
Vinnie Anderson
Nigel Vagana
Alex Chan
Shontayne Hape
Goals:
Brent Webb (4/5)
KC Stadium, Hull
Attendance: 23,377 [1]
Referee: Tim Mander Australia


GREAT BRITAIN
1. Paul Wellens · 2. Brian Carney · 3. Martin Gleeson · 4. Keith Senior · 5. Stuart Reardon · 6. Iestyn Harris · 7. Danny McGuire · 8. Stuart Fielden · 9. Matt Diskin · 10. Adrian Morley · 11. Gareth Ellis · 12. Andy Farrell (c) · 13. Sean O'Loughlin
Interchange: 14. Mickey Higham · 15. Chev Walker · 16. Paul Johnson · 17. Danny Ward
Coach: Brian Noble

NEW ZEALAND
1. Brent Webb · 2. Francis Meli · 3. Nigel Vagana · 4. Clinton Toopi · 5. Shontayne Hape · 6. Vinnie Anderson · 7. Thomas Leuluai · 8. Jason Cayless · 13. Louis Anderson · 10. Paul Rauhihi (c) · 11. Logan Swann · 12. Ali Lauitiiti · 17. Wairangi Koopu
Interchange: 9. Dene Halatau · 15. Roy Asotasi · 16. Nathan Cayless · 19. Alex Chan
Coach: Daniel Anderson

Tournament standings[edit]

Team Played Won Drew Lost For Against Difference Points
 Great Britain 4 3 0 1 80 60 +20 6
 Australia 4 2 1 1 72 60 +12 5
 New Zealand 4 0 1 3 64 95 −32 1

Final[edit]

Saturday, 27 November
Great Britain  4–44  Australia
Tries:
Stuart Reardon




Gaols:
Andrew Farrell (0/1)
Report Tries:
Anthony Minichiello (2)
Willie Tonga (2)
Matt Sing
Darren Lockyer
Willie Mason
Gaols:
Darren Lockyer (6/6)
Craig Fitzgibbon (2/2)
Elland Road, Leeds
Attendance: 39,120[3]
Referee/s: Russell Smith England
Man of the Match: Darren Lockyer Australia
Great Britain Position Australia
Paul Wellens FB Anthony Minichiello
Brian Carney WG Luke Rooney
Martin Gleeson CE Shaun Berrigan
Keith Senior CE Willie Tonga
Stuart Reardon WG Matt Sing
Iestyn Harris FE Darren Lockyer (c)
Sean Long HB Brett Kimmorley
Stuart Fielden PR Shane Webcke
Terry Newton HK Danny Buderus
Adrian Morley PR Petero Civoniceva
Jamie Peacock SR Andrew Ryan
Andrew Farrell (c) SR Nathan Hindmarsh
Paul Sculthorpe LF Tonie Carroll
Danny McGuire Int. Craig Wing
Paul Johnson Int. Mark O'Meley
Ryan Bailey Int. Craig Fitzgibbon
Sean O'Loughlin Int. Willie Mason
Brian Noble Coach Wayne Bennett

Player statistics[edit]

Non-series Tests[edit]

During the series, Australia and New Zealand both played an additional test match against France.

2004-11-12
France  20–24  New Zealand

2004-11-21
France  30–52  Australia
Stade Ernest Wellon, Toulouse
Attendance: 10,000

Additional Matches[edit]

A one off match was also played between an ANZAC side made up of touring Australian and New Zealand players and a Cumbria side.[4][5][6]

2004-10-27
Cumbria Western Suburbs colours.svg 12–64 ANZAC Combination
Derwent Park, Workington
Attendance: 4,203

On their way back to Australia just four days after the Tri-Nations Final, the Kangaroos played a match, known as the Liberty Bell Cup against the USA at the Franklin Field in Philadelphia. Played in quarters instead of halves, and on a synthetic field that was the size of a Grid iron field, the American's shocked the Australians by racing to an 18-0 lead nearing half time and actually went into the long break with a 24-6 lead. They managed to keep their lead until late in the game when the fitness of the Australians, who had bombed numerous try scoring opportunities through the game, told and the Kangaroos overhauled the home team to win 36-24.[7]

2004-12-1
United States  24–36  Australia
Franklin Field, Philadelphia
Attendance: N/A

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Tri-Nations 2004". Rugby League Project. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  2. ^ "Gillette extend rugby ties". SportBusiness. 2004-09-03. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  3. ^ Hughes, Ed (28 November 2004). "Great Britain 4 Australia 44: Kangaroos crush Lions' pride". The Sunday Times. UK: Times Newspapers Ltd. p. 2. Retrieved 6 March 2011. 
  4. ^ Three-Try Heroes Whitehaven News, 29 October 2004. Accessed 2009-08-14. Archived 2009-08-16.
  5. ^ Fans to meet Anzacs players Allerdale Borough Council, 6 October 2004. Accessed 2009-08-14. Archived 2009-08-16.
  6. ^ Kimmorley to captain Anzac team AAP, 26 October 2004
  7. ^ USA vs Australia 1st half

External links[edit]