AMN082

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
AMN082
AMN082 structure.png
Names
IUPAC name
N,N'-dibenzhydrylethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.163.413
Properties
C28H30Cl2N2
Molar mass 465.4572
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

AMN082 (N,N'-dibenzhydrylethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride) is a selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) allosteric agonist.[1][2] It mimics the effect of glutamate. AMN082 is the first selective mGluR7 agonist and has expanded the potential array of research opportunities on the effects of mGluR7 in the CNS.

Significance[edit]

The two main types of glutamate receptors are ionotropic receptors and metabotropic receptors. Ionotropic receptors (iGluRs) are fast-acting ligand-gated ion channels and include AMPA, Kainate and NMDA. Metabotropic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, longer-lasting effects through second messenger systems and are responsible for other neuronal functions that are not typically controlled by iGluRs. mGluRs are split into 3 separate groups (Group I, Group II, Group III) based on pharmacological profile, sequence homology, and preferred signal transduction pathway. mGlur7 is a member of Group III, the least studied of the groups. The discovery of AMN082 will serve as a useful pharmacological tool to expand research on Group III mGluRs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Li X, Gardner EL, Xi ZX (March 2008). "The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) allosteric agonist AMN082 modulates nucleus accumbens GABA and glutamate, but not dopamine, in rats". Neuropharmacology. 54 (3): 542–51. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2007.11.005. PMC 2410088Freely accessible. PMID 18155073. 
  2. ^ Palucha A, Klak K, Branski P, van der Putten H, Flor PJ, Pilc A (November 2007). "Activation of the mGlu7 receptor elicits antidepressant-like effects in mice". Psychopharmacology (Berl.). 194 (4): 555–62. doi:10.1007/s00213-007-0856-2. PMID 17622518.