André Cordeiro (swimmer)

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André Cordeiro
Personal information
Full name André Cordeiro
Nationality  Brazil
Born (1974-03-15) March 15, 1974 (age 41)
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Height 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)
Weight 85 kg (187 lb)
Sport
Sport Swimming
Strokes Freestyle

André Cordeiro (born March 15, 1974 in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais) is a retired freestyle swimmer from Brazil. He competed for his native country at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, United States.

Participating in the 1995 FINA World Swimming Championships (25 m) held in Rio de Janeiro, Cordeiro won the gold medal in the 4×100-metre freestyle, along with Gustavo Borges, Fernando Scherer and Alexandre Massura,[1] with 3m12s42 time.

In the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Cordeiro qualified to the 4×100-metre freestyle final, finishing 4th.[2]

He was at the 1999 FINA World Swimming Championships (25 m) in Hong Kong, swimming the 200-metre freestyle proof.[3]

André was in 1999 Pan American Games in Winnipeg, where he earned a gold medal in the 4×100-metre freestyle, and a silver medal in the 4×200-metre freestyle.[4] In the 4×100-metre freestyle, Cordeiro broke the South American record, with a time of 3:17.18, along with Gustavo Borges, Fernando Scherer and César Quintaes.[5][6] In the 4×200-metre freestyle, he broke the South American record, with a time of 7:22.92, along with Gustavo Borges, Rodrigo Castro and Leonardo Costa.[7][8][9]

In the 2002 FINA World Swimming Championships (25 m) in Moscow, Cordeiro reached the 4×200-metre freestyle final, finishing in 4th place,[10] and was also in the 4×100-metre freestyle final, finishing in 5th place.[11]

He swam at the 2002 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships, where he finished 4th in the 4×100-metre freestyle, 5th in the 4×200-metre freestyle, 5th in the 4×100-metre medley, 13th in the 100-metre freestyle, and 15th in the 50-metre freestyle. [12]

After retiring from professional swimming, became coach of Minas Tênis Clube. He was part of the technical commission of the Brazilian team at the Junior World Championships in Monterrey-2008.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brazil squad leaves for Kuwait". CBDA (in Portuguese). December 6, 2010. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Profile at Sports Reference". Sports Reference. 2013. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Congress discusses doping in swimming". Diário do Grande ABC (in Portuguese). 1999. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Brazil Medals at the Pan 1999". UOL (in Portuguese). 2007. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  5. ^ "History of Gustavo Borges". Gustavo Borges-Official Site (in Portuguese). 2012. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  6. ^ "rotates Brazilian enters the final and the Olympics". CBDA (in Portuguese). March 25, 2007. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  7. ^ "History of Gustavo Borges". Gustavo Borges-Official Site (in Portuguese). 2012. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  8. ^ "The Olympics of David". CBDA (in Portuguese). August 17, 2004. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  9. ^ "With 15 medals, seven gold, Winnipeg Pan-1999 was swimming mark". R7 (in Portuguese). May 29, 2011. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Results of the 4×200-metre freestyle at 2002 Moscow". OmegaTiming. April 4, 2002. Retrieved April 1, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Results of the 4×100-metre freestyle at 2002 Moscow". OmegaTiming. April 3, 2002. Retrieved April 3, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Bruno Bonfim closes as the 12th athlete with index". CBDA (in Portuguese). August 29, 2002. Retrieved April 19, 2013. 
  13. ^ "BRAZILIAN TEAM - PROFILE OF TECHNICAL COMMITTEE". Best Swimming (in Portuguese). June 30, 2008. Retrieved April 3, 2013.