Animethon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Animethon
Animethon Official Logo.PNG
Canada's Longest Running Anime Festival
Status Active
Venue Shaw Conference Centre
Location(s) Edmonton, Alberta
Country Canada
Inaugurated 1994
Attendance 8,218 in 2017[1]
Organized by Alberta Society for Asian Popular Arts (ASAPA)
Website
https://www.animethon.org/
Conventions goers enjoying the Japanese concert at Animethon 19

Animethon is a three-day anime convention held annually at Shaw Conference Centre in Edmonton, Alberta. It is Canada's longest-running anime convention, the first being held in 1994.

Convention History[edit]

Animethon was formed back in 1994 by the Banzai Anime Klub of Alberta (BAKA) and hosted by (BAKA II), with the intention of promoting Japanese anime. It became a success by presenting well-known and more obscure anime to audiences and has since grown to what it is now. Today, Animethon is presented by the non-profit organization, Alberta Society for Asian Popular Arts (ASAPA).

In the beginning, Animethon 1 was a one-day event that allowed people to view different Japanese anime movies and television shows within two classrooms at Grant MacEwan. From there, it expanded to the whole 106th street building during Animethon 2 through 10. It was not until Animethon 11 that the festival grew to utilize the entire university campus for events, artist alley, education panels, and a large vendor hall. As such, the steady increase of numbers in attendees to Animethon has allowed for various vendors to expose themselves to a unique group of people both young and old.[1]

With an estimated 4,000 people in 2003, Animethon was the tenth largest anime convention in North America that year.[2]

Animethon has experienced several years of consecutive growth in attendance while increasing their scope to include guests from Japan such as DaizyStripper, Kanon Wakeshima, An Cafe, FLOW, and Ladybeard.[1]

Events and programming[edit]

Animethon has expanded their focus beyond screening anime and now also include voice actor guests from North America, musical acts from North America and Japan, improvisation groups, as well as various related activities such as gaming, costume contests, anime music video compilations/contests, and more.

Event history[edit]

Dates Location Atten. Guests
July 1994 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada[3]
July 1995 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
80[4]
July 13–14, 1996 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
300[5]
July 12–13, 1997 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
1,200[6]
July 11–12, 1998 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,500[7]
July 10–11, 1999 Grant MacEwan Community College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,700[8]
July 15–16, 2000 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
1,800[9]
July 14–15, 2001 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
3,000[10]
July 13–14, 2002 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada[11]
July 12–13, 2003 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,000[12]
July 17–18, 2004 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,700 The 404s and Debbie Munro[13]
August 5–7, 2005 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
3,755 The 404s, Rob Bakewell, Brian Dobson, and Debbie Munro.[14]
July 7–9, 2006 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
3,450[15] Randy Brososky, Consplayers.com, Trevor Devall, Brian Dobson, Michael Dobson, Tom Edwards, Cole Howard, Kirby Morrow, and PikminLink.[16]
August 10–12, 2007 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,349[15][17] The 404s, Trevor Devall, Tiffany Grant, Matt Greenfield, Kyle Hebert, and Vic Mignogna.[18]
August 8–10, 2008 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,679[15] The 404s, Randy Brososky, Michael Daingerfield, Kyle Hebert, Stephen Notley, and Sonny Strait.[19]
August 7–9, 2009 Grant MacEwan College
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,881[15][20] The 404s, Michael Daingerfield, Aaron Dismuke, Paul Dobson, Caitlin Glass, The Slants, and Brad Swaile.[21]
August 6–8, 2010 Grant MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
4,753[15] The 404s, Chris Cason, Brian Dobson, Michael Dobson, Paul Dobson, Kyle Hebert, L33tStr33t Boys, Wendy Powell, Spike Spencer, Synaptic Chaos Theatre, Thwomp[22]
August 5–7, 2011[23] Grant MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
5,346[15] The 404s, Bespa Kumamero, Todd Haberkorn, L33tStr33t Boys, Kirby Morrow, Trina Nishimura, Synaptic Chaos Theatre[24][25]
August 10–12, 2012 Grant MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
6,404[1] The 404s, Johnny Yong Bosch, DaizyStripper, Eyeshine, Todd Haberkorn, Synaptic Chaos Theatre, Cathy Weseluck[26][27]
August 9–11, 2013 Grant MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
8,058 The 404s, Troy Baker, Capella, Kanon Wakeshima, DJ Shimamura, Patrick Seitz, Christopher Sabat, Twinfools and Nova, Lucas Gilbertson, Carol-Anne Day, Brendan Hunter, Combofiend.[28][29]
August 8–10, 2014 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
8,728 An Cafe, Magistina Saga, Satsuki Yukino, Cristina Vee, Monica Rial, Karen Strassman, Cherami Leigh, The 404's, Vensy[30]
August 7–9, 2015 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
9,468 FLOW (band), Josh Grelle, Christine Marie Cabanos, Brina Palencia, Carrie Keranen, Jamie Marchi, Liui Aquino, Sarah Williams, The 404's[31]
August 5–7, 2016 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
8,874 Ladybeard, Lotus Juice, Another Story, AKIRA, Bryce Papenbrook, Eric Vale, Caitlin Glass, Misa Chiang, The 404's Improv, Orbis Symphony Orchestra[32]
August 11–13, 2017 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
8,218 Mika Kobayashi, The Sixth Lie, TeddyLoid, Josh Grelle, Max Mittelman, Micah Solusod, Ray Chase, Robbie Daymond, Baozi & Hana, TheIshter, The 404's Improv, Orbis Symphony Orchestra[33]
August 10–12, 2018 Shaw Conference Centre
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
TBD Erica Lindbeck, Mela Lee[34]

A Taste of Animethon[edit]

A Taste of Animethon was first created in 2010. While nowhere near the size of Animethon itself it's been a successful event in its own right with a steadily growing attendance.

Event history[edit]

Dates Location Atten. Guests
January 2010 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
600 Synaptic Chaos Theatre
January 2011 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
800 The 404s[35]
January 2012 MacEwan University
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
1200 Synaptic Chaos Theatre[36]
January 26, 2013 The Ramada Conference Centre Downtown
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
1,505[37] The 404s[38]
January 31 – February 1, 2014 The Ramada Conference Centre Downtown
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,295[37] Kyle Hebert, The 404s, TheIshter[39]
February 20–21, 2015 The Ramada Conference Centre Downtown
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,371[37] Bryce Papenbrook, The 404s, Courtney "Courtoon" Morelock[40]
January 22–23, 2016 Shaw Conference Centre
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
3,065[37] Colleen Clickenbeard, Reika, Misako Aoki, The 404s, TheIshter, Edmonton Concept Pop Orchestra[41]
January 20–21, 2017 Shaw Conference Centre
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,915[37] Aza Miyuko, Cassandra Lee Morris, Clifford Chapin, Aimee Blackschleger, Hey Listen, Mike Sass, The 404s[42]
January 19–20, 2018 Shaw Conference Centre
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2,926[37] Bryson Baugus, Lauren Landa, Nobutoshi Canna, The 404s[43]

ASAPA control[edit]

ASAPA Official Logo

In 2004 the event was transferred to a new society, the Alberta Society for Asian Popular Arts (ASAPA), a non-profit society that focuses on the promotion and enjoyment of Asian popular art and culture. The society is also the financial and legal backbone of Animethon, formed under the Societies Act of Alberta.[44]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Animethon 25 - About". animethon.org. Retrieved May 23, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Ten largest North American anime conventions of 2003". AnimeCons.ca. January 1, 2004. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  3. ^ "Animethon 1994 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  4. ^ "Animethon 1995 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  5. ^ "Animethon 1996 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  6. ^ "Animethon 1997 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  7. ^ "Animethon 1998 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  8. ^ "Animethon 1999 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  9. ^ "Animethon 2000 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  10. ^ "Animethon 2001 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  11. ^ "Animethon 2002 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  12. ^ "Animethon 2003 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  13. ^ "Animethon 2004 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  14. ^ "Animethon 2005 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f "Animethon - History". ASAPA. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Animethon 2006 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  17. ^ "Animethon has much to offer". canada.com. Retrieved September 20, 2009. 
  18. ^ "Animethon 2007 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  19. ^ "Animethon 2008 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  20. ^ "'Cosplay' chess highlights Edmonton Animethon 16". edmontonjournal.com. Archived from the original on August 13, 2009. Retrieved September 20, 2009. 
  21. ^ "Animethon 2009 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  22. ^ "Animethon 2010 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  23. ^ "Animethon Date Announced". anime-alberta.org. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 
  24. ^ "GuestArticles". animethon.org. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  25. ^ "Animethon 2011 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  26. ^ "Animethon 19 guests". Retrieved April 27, 2012. 
  27. ^ "Animethon 2012 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  28. ^ "Animethon 20 guests". Retrieved July 14, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Animethon 2013 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  30. ^ "Animethon 2014 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  31. ^ "Animethon 2015 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  32. ^ "Animethon 2016 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  33. ^ "Animethon 2017 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  34. ^ "Animethon 2018 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  35. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2011 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  36. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2012 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f http://www.animethon.org/
  38. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2013 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  39. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2014 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  40. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2015 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  41. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2016 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  42. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2017 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  43. ^ "A Taste of Animethon 2018 Convention Information". AnimeCons.ca. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  44. ^ "Alberta Society for Asian Popular Arts". Asapa.ca. Retrieved May 10, 2008. 

External links[edit]