Antoinette Hatfield Hall

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Antoinette Hatfield Hall
New Theatre Building
Antoinette Hatfield, PCPA, Portland.JPG
The building's exterior in 2012
Address 1111 Southwest Broadway
Portland, Oregon
United States
Coordinates 45°31′00″N 122°40′54″W / 45.5166°N 122.6817°W / 45.5166; -122.6817Coordinates: 45°31′00″N 122°40′54″W / 45.5166°N 122.6817°W / 45.5166; -122.6817
Owner Portland Center for the Performing Arts (PCPA)
Type Performing arts center
Capacity Newmark: 880
Dolores Winningstad: 304
Brunish Theatre: 200
Construction
Opened 1987
Architect Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolf, Boles & Associates and Barton Myers
Website
www.pcpa.com

Antoinette Hatfield Hall, formerly known as the New Theatre Building, is a 127,000-square-foot (11,800 m2) complex located in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. It is one of three buildings in the Portland Center for the Performing Arts (PCPA), which also includes Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and Keller Auditorium. Hatfield Hall contains the Dolores Winningstad Theatre, Newmark Theatre, and Brunish Theatre (formerly Brunish Hall). It was dedicated in honor of the wife of former U.S. Senator and Oregon governor Mark Hatfield.

Construction[edit]

The hall's main entrance

Hatfield Hall was built at a cost of $28.4 million and opened in 1987 as the New Theatre Building.[1][2] It was designed by Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolf, Boles & Associates, Barton Myers, and ELS of Berkeley California.[3]

Theatre venues[edit]

Antoinette Hatfield Hall is part of the Portland Center for the Performing Arts (PCPA), which also includes Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and Keller Auditorium.[4] Three theatre venues are contained in Hatfield Hall: Dolores Winningstad Theatre, the Newmark Theatre, and Brunish Theatre.[5] Known for 19 years as the New Theatre Building, Hatfield Hall was dedicated December 13, 2007, in honor of Antoinette Hatfield, wife of former U.S. Senator and Oregon governor Mark Hatfield.[6]

Dolores Winningstad Theatre[edit]

Located inside Antoinette Hatfield Hall, Dolores Winningstad Theatre is named in honor of the wife of Norman Winningstad, who made a generous donation in 1984.[7] This venue has 304 seats and is a courtyard-style theatre with flexible seating arrangements.[7]

Newmark Theatre[edit]

An Edwardian-style theatre with 880 seats, the Newmark was named in honor of Herb and Jeanne Mittleman Newmark in 1997. No seat is more than 65 feet (20 m) from the stage.[8]

Brunish Theatre[edit]

With a capacity of 200 seats, Brunish Theatre (formerly Brunish Hall)[9] was named in honor of Corey Brunish's mother. This true black box theatre venue may be configured for "meetings, dinners, conferences, weddings, and performances".[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Designs as varied as uses of city's newer buildings". The Oregonian. February 19, 1990. 
  2. ^ Oden, Betty (July 16, 2010). "Cupid played part in Portland venue's name". Daily Journal of Commerce. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Hatfield, Antoinette, Hall, Portland Center for the Performing Arts (Portland, Oregon)". boundless.uoregon.edu. September 9, 1987. Retrieved November 4, 2015. Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolf, Boles & Associates (BOOR/A) 
  4. ^ Bartels, Eric (September 25, 2007). "Troupes abound, venues don't". Portland Tribune (Pamplin Media Group). Archived from the original on November 1, 2007. Retrieved September 4, 2008. 
  5. ^ "Portland Center for the Performing Arts State of the Stage 2007-2009" (PDF). Portland Center for the Performing Arts. Archived from the original on 15 August 2010. Retrieved August 27, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Art Notes Electronic Edition - Antoinette Hatfield Hall Dedicated". Regional Arts & Culture Council. Retrieved November 4, 2015. Nineteen years after its splashy opening, the "new" theater building of the Portland Center for Performing Arts that houses the Newmark, Winningstad and Brunish theaters finally acquired a name 12/13: the Antoinette Hatfield Hall. Attending the naming tribute, Mrs. Hatfield said she was both surprised and thrilled to learn that her name would adorn the building, which opened across from the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in 1987. 
  7. ^ a b "Winningstad Theatre". www.portland5.com. Portland Center for the Performing Arts. Retrieved November 3, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Newmark Theatre". www.portland5.com. Portland Center for the Performing Arts. Retrieved November 3, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Brunish Hall upgraded to Black Box Theater". Metro News. Metro. March 26, 2012. Retrieved November 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Brunish Theatre". www.portland5.com. Portland Center for the Performing Arts. Retrieved November 3, 2015. 

External links[edit]