Bahawalnagar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
بہاولنگر
(Urdu)
Town
Bahawalnagar
Bahawalnagar.jpg
بہاولنگر is located in Pakistan
بہاولنگر
بہاولنگر
Location in Pakistan
Coordinates: 30°00′N 73°15′E / 30.000°N 73.250°E / 30.000; 73.250
Country Pakistan
Province Punjab
District Bahawalnagar District
Tehsil Bahawalnagar Tehsil
Elevation 509 ft (155 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total 144,127
Time zone PST (UTC+5)
 • Summer (DST) +6 (UTC)

Bahawalnagar (Punjabi,Urdu: بہاولنگر‎), is the capital city of Bahawalnagar District in the Punjab province of Pakistan. It also contains the administrative headquarters of the tehsil.[1]

History[edit]

Bahawalnagar District, situated in the Punjab province of Pakistan, was an agricultural region with forests during the Indus Valley Civilization. The Vedic period is characterized by Indo-Aryan culture that invaded from Central Asia and settled in Punjab region. The Kambojas, Daradas, Kaikayas, Madras, Pauravas, Yaudheyas, Malavas and Kurus settled and ruled ancient Punjab region. After overrunning the Achaemenid Empire in 331 BCE, Alexander marched into present-day Punjab region with an army of 50,000. The Bahawalnagar was ruled by Maurya Empire, Indo-Greek kingdom, Kushan Empire, Gupta Empire, White Huns, Kushano-Hephthalites and Shahi kingdoms. Bahwalnagar was ruled by Rajpoot kings (Chandar Gupat, Maharaja Bakarmajeet, Ashoka, Raja Chandar Bhan Singh, Sabdal Rao, Sodha Rao Hameer) for many years. In 997 CE, Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi, took over the Ghaznavid dynasty empire established by his father, Sultan Sebuktegin, In 1005 he conquered the Shahis in Kabul in 1005, and followed it by the conquests of Punjab region. The Delhi Sultanate and later Mughal Empire ruled the region. The Punjab region became predominantly Muslim due to missionary Sufi saints whose dargahs dot the landscape of Punjab region. From 1690 A.D. to 14 October 1955 Bahawalnagar District was occupied by Daudpota Abbasid and it became one of the districts of Bahawalpur (princely state). The town was named after an Abbasid nawab, Nawab Mohammad Bahawal Khan Abbasi IV.[2]

After the decline of the Mughal Empire, the Sikh invaded the various districts of the Punjab but Bahawalnagar District was not under Sikh rule because it was the part of former Muslim Abbasid state Bahawalpur (princely state). During the period of British rule, Bahawalnagar increased in population and importance.

The predominantly Muslim population supported Muslim League and Pakistan Movement. After the independence of Pakistan in 1947, the minority Hindus and Sikhs migrated to India while the Muslims refugees from India settled down in the Bahawalnagar District.

Railways Station[edit]

The Bahawalnagar railways station played a key role in development of former Bahawalpur state, especially of Bahawalnagar district which was established in 1952-53, while the rail section set up in 1894 was named as Rojhanwali Railway Station. Later, the station was renamed by Nawab Muhammad Bahawal Khan as Bahawalnagar Railway Junction in 1901. But now, it wears a deserted look as no train is running now-a-days. The only train which had been running through these tracks for years from Samma Satta to Amrooka was suspended on July 26, 2011. Moreover railway assets are being stolen and land being grabbed. Beside, most of the Railways quarters and officers accommodation have been occupied by influential persons. The rail service was originally introduced by the Southern Punjab Railway Company among Delhi on 257 kilometres track. The west part of the rail track was laid between Samma Satta and Amrooka section at the Pakistan-India border. It linked Baghdad-ul-Jadeed, Khairpur, Tamewali, Qaimpur, Hasilpur, Chishtian, Bahawalnagar and Mandi Sadiq Gunj railway stations to Ferozpur and Amrooka stations through various lines. Likewise, the second railway track was laid down between Bhatinda and Hindumalkote railway station of Indian state. Before partition of the subcontinent, the rail line was of great importance for connecting Dehli and Karachi. It was utilised for transportation of staff and their belongings in 1947 from India to Karachi. State railway lines were named as Darbar Lines and all their expenditures were borne by the respective states. It was running under the control of the Northern Western Railways. The 112 km Darbar line of the then Bahawalpur state was laid down between Bahawalnagar and Fortabbas in 1928. On the track, new grain markets of Khichiwala,Faqirwali, Haroonabad and Donga Bonga were established. But unfortunately, the rail service on the track had been suspended since long, while a renowned Mandi Dhab Sanateka railway station has been submerged with filthy water. The Bahawalnagar Railways Junction was at its climax in 1935. Then, dozens of rails among Karachi, Delhi and Lahore by Ferozepur, Amrooka, Bahawalnagar to Samma Satta, particularly freight trains from Quetta to Delhi used to run regularly. Hustle and bustle of passengers on the station round-the-clock was a permanent feature and it was considered one of the important railways junctions of the subcontinent at that time. In 1938, a power substation was set up which generated DC power with the help of diesel engine, while today, the railway section has been deprived of electricity supply due to non-payment. After the partition, the well-equipped junction continued its reputation as business centre till 1980. It was more important than the town. It was given final shape in 1935 and 1938, when five hundred quarters for staff were constructed including the railway officers accommodations, railway hospital, DC electricity power station, DAK Bungalow, playgrounds, graveyard, dance club, workshop, Railway police. With the completion of the all railway requirements, it turned into a beautiful location. At its climax, hundreds of workers discharge their duties. A beautiful overhead bridge of the junction was unique for its visitors. Unfortunately, such a glorious railway junction had fallen prey to corruption.[3]

Education Sector[edit]

the population of Bahawalnagar, according to the 1998 Census of Pakistan, is 2,061,447 of which 18.80%. The sub-Campus of Islamia University is also located here. The literacy rate of Bahawalnagar is LESS THAN 25% and unemployment rate is much HIGHER THAN 25%.".[4] As the literacy rate of this city is not quite enough but the government owned institutions offering their services to increase the literacy rate. Universities/Colleges in Bahawalnagar are most famous to boost the career of the students. The sub-Campus of Islamia University[5] is also located in Bahawalnagar from which the students are getting the higher education with up to date syllabus. Among the private/government colleges, Government College of Commerce Bahawalnagar I which number of students have enrolled themselves in Colleges/Universities in Bahawalnagar to get the education for their career growth. Colleges/Universities in Bahawalnagar offering their unique educational services for the students to build the healthy sound mind nation.

Presently the MBA, BBA, M.Com. B.Com. (Honors and IT), MA English, MA Education, MA Urdu, MA Islamiyat, MA Economics, MSc Psychology, MA Punjabi, M.Ed, B.Ed and much more programmes are provided by government owned institutions.

The Government College of Commerce Bahawalnagar offers M.Com, B.Com, D.Com, and CCA programmes . The college normally occupies positions in Top 10 positions in Islamia University and Punjab Board of Technical Exams.

Sports ground[edit]

Haider Stadium is the biggest stadium of Bahawalnagar City as well as Bahawalnagar District. [6]

Languages[edit]

As per national census of 1998, Punjabi is the main language of Bahawalnagar district and is spoken by 1.3 Million people which accounts for 90% of total population of 1.37 Million.[7] Urdu is the national language and is spoken widely while English is spoken by educated elite.

Administration[edit]

Bahawalnagar is the administrative center of Bahawalnagar District, one of the five tehsils or subdivisions of the district, the tehsil is subdivided into 31 Union Councils.[1] The Bahawal Nagar is the district headquarters of tehsils Haroonabad, Chistian, Fortabbass and Minchanabad. It is one of the largest districts of Panjab with respect to its area. The largest union council of Bahawal Nagar is U.C 6.The main towns of bahawalnagar city are model town,farooqabad, khadimabad colony, islamnagar, jahangirtown, faisal colony, nizampura, wukla colony, hussainabad, officer colony, Chaudhary Town, qaimabad, jinnah colony,madni colony,nazira bad, mouchi pura ,wapda colony ,railway colony ,and madina town .[8]

Climate[edit]

Bahawalnagar has a hot desert climate (Köppen climate classification BWh) with hot summers and mild winters. Precipitation mostly falls in the monsoon season from June to August, although some rain also falls from February to April.

Climate data for Bahawalnagar
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 29.3
(84.7)
35.6
(96.1)
39.4
(102.9)
45.6
(114.1)
48.0
(118.4)
50.1
(122.2)
46.0
(114.8)
42.4
(108.3)
42.0
(107.6)
40.0
(104)
37.0
(98.6)
29.6
(85.3)
50.1
(122.2)
Average high °C (°F) 20.6
(69.1)
22.76
(72.97)
28.3
(82.9)
35.9
(96.6)
40.8
(105.4)
42.0
(107.6)
38.3
(100.9)
37.4
(99.3)
36.5
(97.7)
34.2
(93.6)
28.6
(83.5)
22.5
(72.5)
32.322
(90.173)
Daily mean °C (°F) 13.3
(55.9)
15.7
(60.3)
21.0
(69.8)
28.0
(82.4)
32.8
(91)
35.1
(95.2)
33.1
(91.6)
32.4
(90.3)
30.6
(87.1)
26.4
(79.5)
20.6
(69.1)
15.0
(59)
25.33
(77.6)
Average low °C (°F) 5.8
(42.4)
8.4
(47.1)
13.8
(56.8)
20.0
(68)
24.7
(76.5)
28.2
(82.8)
27.8
(82)
27.4
(81.3)
24.7
(76.5)
18.6
(65.5)
12.6
(54.7)
7.6
(45.7)
18.3
(64.94)
Record low °C (°F) 0.0
(32)
−1.0
(30.2)
3.9
(39)
12.6
(54.7)
14.4
(57.9)
18.3
(64.9)
16.1
(61)
21.4
(70.5)
13.1
(55.6)
11.0
(51.8)
4.0
(39.2)
1.7
(35.1)
−1
(30.2)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 4.5
(0.177)
16.5
(0.65)
15.2
(0.598)
10.2
(0.402)
4.8
(0.189)
15.3
(0.602)
77.2
(3.039)
39.9
(1.571)
9.5
(0.374)
1.0
(0.039)
4.3
(0.169)
5.0
(0.197)
203.4
(8.007)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 222.4 218.9 250.8 274.3 269.1 213.9 218.3 256.6 279.3 284.0 260.8 223.5 2,971.9
Source: NOAA (1971–1990)[9]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]