Bethune College

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Bethune College
Bethune School-Building.jpg
Bethune College c. 1949
MottoViddaya Vindatey Amritam
TypeWomen's college
Established1849
PrincipalProfessor Krishna Roy
Location
Kolkata
,
India
AffiliationsUniversity of Calcutta
Websitebethunecollege.ac.in

Bethune College is a women's college located in Kolkata, India, and affiliated to the University of Calcutta. It was established as a girls' school in 1849, and as a college in 1879. It is the oldest women's college in Asia.[1]. It was in news in 2019 for adding Humanity column in the place of religion in its undergraduate application form which is a measure first undertaken by any college in india.

History[edit]

A 1999 stamp dedicated to the Bethune College

The college was founded as the Calcutta Female School in 1849 by John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune,[2] with the financial support of Dakshinaranjan Mukherjee. The school started in Mukherjee's home in Baitakkhana, with 21 girls enrolled.[3] The following year, enrolment rose to 80.[4] In November, on a plot on the west side of Cornwallis Square, the cornerstone for a permanent school building was laid. The name "Hindu Female School" was inscribed on the copper-plate placed in the stone and on the ceremonial silver trowel made for the occasion.[5] Support for the school waned after Bethune's death in August 1951.[4]

The government took it over in 1856, renaming it Bethune School after its founder in 1862–63.[2] In 1879 it was developed into Bethune College, the first women's college in India and Bethune school was first women's school in whole Asia.

Notable alumnae[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bethune College – Banglapedia". en.banglapedia.org. Retrieved 22 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b Acharya, Poromesh (1990). "Education in Old Calcutta". In Chaudhuri, Sukanta (ed.). Calcutta: The Living City. Volume I: The Past. Oxford University Press. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-19-563696-3.
  3. ^ Bagal, Jogesh Chandra (1949). "History of the Bethune School & College (1849–1949)". In Nag, Kalidas; Ghose, Lotika (eds.). Bethune School & College Centenary Volume, 1849–1949. Bethune College. p. 11–12.
  4. ^ a b Forbes, Geraldine; Forbes, Geraldine Hancock (1999). Women in Modern India. 4. Cambridge University Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-0-521-65377-0.
  5. ^ Bagal, Jogesh Chandra (1949). "History of the Bethune School & College (1849–1949)". In Nag, Kalidas; Ghose, Lotika (eds.). Bethune School & College Centenary Volume, 1849–1949. Bethune College. p. 15-16.
  6. ^ a b Ray, Bharati (1990). "Women in Calcutta: The Years of Change". In Chaudhuri, Sukanta (ed.). Calcutta: The Living City. Volume II: The Present and Future. Oxford University Press. p. 34. ISBN 978-0-19-563697-0.
  7. ^ a b Southard, Barbara (May 1993). Colonial Politics and Women's Rights: Woman Suffrage Campaigns in Bengal, British India in the 1920s. Modern Asian Studies. 27. p. 405–406. JSTOR 312775.
  8. ^ a b c Ghosh, Durba (August 2013). Revolutionary Women and Nationalist Heroes in Bengal, 1930 to the 1980s. Gender & History. 25. p. 355–375.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 22°35′18″N 88°22′04″E / 22.5882°N 88.3679°E / 22.5882; 88.3679