Bill Casey

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For the former Central Intelligence Agency director, see William J. Casey. For other people named Bill Casey, see William Casey (disambiguation).
Bill Casey
MP
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Cumberland—Colchester
Assumed office
October 19, 2015
Preceded by Scott Armstrong
(Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley)
In office
June 2, 1997 – June 28, 2004
Preceded by Dianne Brushett
Succeeded by Riding Abolished
In office
November 21, 1988 – October 25, 1993
Preceded by Robert C. Coates
Succeeded by Dianne Brushett
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley
In office
June 28, 2004 – April 30, 2009
Preceded by Riding Established
Succeeded by Scott Armstrong
Personal details
Born (1945-02-19) February 19, 1945 (age 70)
Amherst, Nova Scotia
Political party Liberal (2014-present)
Other political
affiliations
Progressive Conservative (1988-2003)
Conservative (2003-2007)
Independent (2007-2014)
Spouse(s) Rosemary Casey
Residence Amherst, Nova Scotia
Profession Businessman, stockbroker

William D. "Bill" Casey, MP, (born February 19, 1945) is a Canadian politician from Nova Scotia. He is a Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons. First elected as a Progressive Conservative in 1988, he later sat as Conservative MP following the party merger in 2003. In 2007, Casey was expelled from the party for voting against the 2007 budget, but he was reelected as an Independent in the 2008 election and sat as such until he resigned his seat in 2009 to work on behalf of the Nova Scotian government for provincial interests in Ottawa. Casey decided to return to federal politics in the 2015 federal election and running as a Liberal easily took the seat with 63.73% of the popular vote.

Life and career[edit]

Casey was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia. He was a businessman and stockbroker before going into politics. He was first elected, as a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, to represent the riding of Cumberland—Colchester in the 1988 election. In common with almost every other PC Member of Parliament (MP) in the 1993 election he lost his seat, in his case being defeated by Liberal candidate Dianne Brushett.[1]

In the 1997 election, he retook the seat, defeating Brushett,[2] and represented it until April 30, 2009.

In 2003, the PCs merged into the new Conservative Party. He was the deputy whip of the Official Opposition from 2004 until the 2006 election, and had served as the Conservative critic of Transport, International Trade, National Revenue, and Foreign Affairs in the past.

When the Conservatives' 2007 budget was released, Casey praised it, saying "I have never seen a budget that has had more in it for the people of my riding than this one does."[3] However, on June 5, 2007, he voted against it, claiming that it broke the Atlantic Accord with his province and Newfoundland and Labrador. He was expelled from the Conservative caucus, and sat as an Independent MP.[4] He styled himself as an Independent Progressive Conservative.[5]

In October 2007, the Conservative Party riding association in Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley renominated Casey as its candidate for the 2008 election. The party's head office refused to accept Casey's nomination, and suspended the association's board.[6]

On January 31, 2008 Casey underwent surgery for prostate cancer. His surgery was a success and all the cancer was removed. Casey previously had to have a cancerous growth removed from his back.[7]

On September 4, the Green Party of Canada declared its support for his candidacy and announced that they would not run a candidate against him in the 2008 election.[8] On October 14, 2008, Casey was re-elected as an independent by winning 69% of the popular vote. His nearest opponent was Karen Olsen of the New Democrats with just 12% of the vote.[9]

During the 2008 Canadian parliamentary dispute, Casey announced he would vote against Harper in a motion of non-confidence.[10] He announced in January 2009 that he would not run for re-election in the next federal election[11] However, on April 28, 2009, Nova Scotia Premier Rodney MacDonald announced that Casey would be the senior representative for the Department of Intergovernmental Affairs in Ottawa for the province, replacing Ian Thompson.[12] Casey officially resigned his seat April 30.

On November 18, 2014, Casey announced he was running for the Liberal nomination in his former riding for the 2015 federal election[13] and won the nomination vote on February 28, 2015.[14][15] On October 19, 2015, Casey won the election, defeating Conservative incumbent Scott Armstrong.[16][17][18]

Personal life[edit]

Casey was diagnosed with malignant melanoma in 2006 and underwent two surgeries to have the cancerous mole removed.[19] He battled prostate cancer and underwent a surgery in early February 2008.[20][21]

Electoral record[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2015: Cumberland—Colchester
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Bill Casey 29,527 63.73 +45.35
Conservative Scott Armstrong 12,257 26.45 –26.48
New Democratic Wendy Robinson 2,647 5.71 –16.77
Green Jason Matthew Blanch 1,650 3.56 –1.81
Independent Kenneth Jackson 181 0.39
Independent Richard Trueman Plett 70 0.15
Total valid votes/Expense limit 46,332 100.0     $206,116.04
Total rejected ballots 178 0.38 –0.25
Turnout 46,510 71.64 +13.30
Eligible voters 64,923
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +35.92
Source: Elections Canada[22][23]
Canadian federal election, 2008: Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Independent Bill Casey 27,303 69.01 +16.97 $68,549.58
New Democratic Karen Olsson 4,874 12.32 -8.42 $6,944.11
Conservative Joel Bernard 3,493 8.83 -43.21 $35,846.73
Liberal Tracy Parsons 3,344 8.45 -15.44 $28,266.26
Independent Rick Simpson 550 1.39 +0.17 none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,564 100.0     $84,518
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 201 0.51 +0.04
Turnout 39,765 57.77 -4.08
Eligible voters 68,831
Independent gain from Conservative Swing +12.68
Canadian federal election, 2006: Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Bill Casey 22,439 52.04 +1.55 $50,744.39
Liberal Gary Richard 10,299 23.89 -2.60 $30,783.20
New Democratic Margaret Sagar 8,944 20.74 +1.83 $15,901.38
Green Bruce Farrell 910 2.11 -1.00 $118.51
Independent Rick Simpson 524 1.22 $253.00
Total valid votes/Expense limit 43,116 100.0     $79,110
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 203 0.47 -0.01
Turnout 43,319 61.85
Eligible voters 70,036
Conservative hold Swing +2.08
Canadian federal election, 2004: North Nova
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Bill Casey 20,188 50.49 -9.99 $63,528.46
Liberal Dianne Brushett 10,591 26.49 +0.13 $40,391.55
New Democratic Margaret Sagar 7,560 18.91 +5.87 $14,509.58
Green Sheila Richardson 1,245 3.11 $1,050.38
Progressive Canadian Jack Moors 399 1.00 $553.10
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,983 100.0     $76,024
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 192 0.48
Turnout 40,175 60.46 -0.32
Eligible voters 66,451
Conservative notional gain from Progressive Conservative Swing -5.06
Changes from 2000 are based on redistributed results. Conservative Party change is based on the combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party totals.
Canadian federal election, 2000: Cumberland—Colchester
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 18,716 48.49 +4.86
Liberal Dianne Brushett 10,271 26.61 +0.82
Alliance Bryden Ryan 4,981 12.91 -1.08
New Democratic James Harpell 4,629 11.99 -2.21
Total valid votes 38,597 100.00
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 2.84
Canadian federal election, 1997: Cumberland—Colchester
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 18,610 43.63 +7.15
Liberal Dianne Brushett 11,002 25.79 -16.80
New Democratic Peter Stewart 6,058 14.20 +8.64
Reform Bob Peterson 5,970 13.99 +0.80
Independent Ray Merriam 826 1.94
Natural Law Phyllis Hall 193 0.45 -0.28
Total valid votes 42,659 100.00
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +11.98
Canadian federal election, 1993: Cumberland—Colchester
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Dianne Brushett 18,195 42.59 +1.03
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 15,582 36.48 -9.71
Reform Audrey Staples 5,636 13.19
New Democratic Barbara Jack 2,374 5.56 -3.76
Christian Heritage Steve McLean 618 1.45 -1.02
Natural Law Phyllis Hall 312 0.73
Total valid votes 42,717 100.00
Liberal gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +5.37
Canadian federal election, 1988: Cumberland—Colchester
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 20,384 46.19 -11.10
Liberal Dennis James 18,340 41.56 +11.96
New Democratic Barbara Jack 4,112 9.32 -3.78
Christian Heritage Norman W. Pearce 1,088 2.47
Independent Bob Kirk 210 0.48
Total valid votes 44,134 100.00
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -11.53

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Atlantic region hands Liberals near-clean sweep". The Chronicle Herald. October 26, 1993. Archived from the original on July 20, 2001. Retrieved September 29, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Casey cruises back to power". The Chronicle Herald. June 3, 1997. Archived from the original on February 12, 2001. Retrieved September 29, 2014. 
  3. ^ MP Casey surprised at controversy caused by budget, Truro Daily News, March 22, 2007.
  4. ^ "Tory MP ejected from caucus after budget vote". CBC News. June 5, 2007. Retrieved April 15, 2014. 
  5. ^ "N.S. premier urges revolt against federal budget". CTV News. June 10, 2007. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Riding uproar over Tories' decision to oust executive". CanWest News Service. October 29, 2007. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Surgery a success: Bill Casey recovering at home following prostate operation". Amherst Daily News. February 4, 2008. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Green Party will not run against Bill Casey" (Press release). Green Party of Canada. September 4, 2008. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Harper bets the House, wins another minority". The Globe and Mail. October 15, 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Casey to vote non-confidence against his former party". Metro News Halifax. December 1, 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Independent MP Casey won't seek re-election". CBC News. January 13, 2009. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Turfed Tory Casey to be Nova Scotia's chief lobbyist in Ottawa". CBC News. April 28, 2009. Retrieved April 4, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Former MP Bill Casey wants to run for federal Liberals next year". CBC News. November 18, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Bill Casey is the Liberal Candidate for Cumberland-Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley". CBC News. February 28, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Casey wins Cumberland Colchester Liberal nomination for upcoming federal election". Truro Daily News. February 28, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Bill Casey snatches Cumberland-Colchester from Conservatives". CBC News. October 19, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Bill Casey 'glad to be part of the change'". The Chronicle Herald. October 19, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Bill Casey takes Liberal seat in historic Cumberland-Colchester win". Global News. October 19, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  19. ^ Cole, Darrell (May 29, 2014). "Amid warnings on melanoma rates, former MP Bill Casey shares his cancer story". The Amherst News. Retrieved September 18, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Nova Scotia MP Bill Casey on mend after prostate cancer surgery". Cape Breton Post. February 28, 2008. Retrieved September 18, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Nova Scotia MP Bill Casey expects full recovery from prostate cancer". CBC News. March 13, 2008. Retrieved September 18, 2014. 
  22. ^ "October 19, 2015 Election Results — Cumberland—Colchester (Validated results)". Elections Canada. 21 October 2015. Retrieved 24 October 2015. 
  23. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates

External links[edit]