List of Houston Independent School District elementary schools

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West University Elementary School in West University Place
Roberts Elementary School in Southgate
Mark Twain Elementary School in Braeswood Place
Longfellow Elementary School
Barbara Bush Elementary School in Parkway Villages
Condit Elementary School in Bellaire
Lovett Elementary School in Meyerland
Horn Academy in Bellaire
St. George Place Elementary School in St. George Place
Benavidez Elementary School in Gulfton
Red Elementary School in Willow Meadows
Shearn Elementary School in Westwood
Kolter Elementary School in Meyerland
Rodríguez Elementary School in Gulfton
Reynolds Elementary School
Cunningham Elementary School
MacGregor Elementary School
Young Elementary School in Sunnyside

This list includes Houston Independent School District schools that only house the elementary school level. For other schools (including K-8 schools which were previously elementary only), see List of Houston Independent School District schools.

Traditional elementary schools[edit]

Other elementary schools[edit]

  • Arabic Immersion Magnet School (Houston)
  • Energized For Excellence Academy (Houston)
  • Mandarin Chinese Language Immersion Magnet School (Houston)
  • North District Alternative Elementary School (Houston)
  • Pleasant Hill Academy (Houston)
  • Pro-Vision School (Houston)
  • Shadowbriar Elementary School (Houston) (Magnet K-5) (Opened 1997 [14])
    • Originally a 6th grade school[134]
    • Previously served grades 3-5
  • Soar Center (Houston)
  • St. John's Academy (Houston) - Serves preschool to second grade children in certain scenarios, such as homelessness and health crises.[54]
  • TSU/HISD Lab School (Houston, In fall 2006 the school became an HISD-sponsored charter school)
  • Young Learners (Houston)
  • Young Scholars Academy For Excellence (Houston)

Former schools[edit]

Clinton Park Elementary School in Clinton Park closed in 2005
Douglass Elementary School (now Yellowstone Academy) in the Third Ward
The former Gregory School in the Fourth Ward, now the African American Library at the Gregory School
Houston ISD Central Region Office in the Houston Heights, formerly Holden Elementary School
J. Will Jones Elementary School in Midtown
Luckie School in East Downtown
Will Rogers Elementary School (closed and demolished)

Former zoned schools

  • 23rd Avenue Elementary School (Destroyed by a fire in 1959, reopened as Holden in 1960)[54]
  • Abbott Elementary School (3601 Barnes, opened in 1912 as part of the Chaneyville Independent School District, transferred to the City of Houston in 1914, closed in 1959[54])
  • Alamo Elementary School (201 East 27th, opened 1913 as Sunset Heights Elementary School, closed 1980[54])
  • Charlotte B. Allen Elementary School (Houston)
    • Allen closed in 2009. A new campus will be built on the Allen site; when it opens in spring 2011 it will take students from Allen and Kennedy elementary schools[67][68]
  • Alyce PreK-1 Center[135](Houston)
  • Argyle Elementary School (12525 Fondren Road, Houston, 77035) (Closed spring 2005, Argyle was located in a strip mall - Students rezoned to Foerster ES)
  • Bellfort Academy (Houston) (4-5, opened 1999)
    • Was consolidated into Lewis Elementary so that all grades attend the same campus; the consolidated school was expected to open in Spring 2011.[71] Bellfort became a PreK-K center.[136]
  • Richard J. Brock Elementary School (1417 Houston Avenue, Houston, 77007) (Closed spring 2005, Students rezoned to Crockett ES) - Campus became an early childhood center
  • Brays Bayou Elementary School (Almeda near Main, became a part of HISD in 1913 and closed in 1966[54])
  • Burgess Elementary School (4040 Blackshear, opened in September 1962, closed in 1969 and consolidated into the Washington High School campus) - Burgess was named for the first mayor of Independence Heights
  • Carnegie Elementary School (10401 Scott, Houston, 77051) (Closed spring 2002, Students rezoned to Woodson K-8 Center) - Campus became a high school (named after Andrew Carnegie)
  • Robert C. Chatham Elementary School (8110 Bertwood, Houston, 77016) (closed in spring 2006, Students rezoned to Cook ES)
  • W. D. Cleveland Elementary School (320 Jackson Hill, closed 1977[54])
  • Clinton Park Elementary School (129 Mississippi, Houston, 77029 - Clinton Park) (closed in spring 2005, Students rezoned to Pleasantville ES)
    • Prior to spring 2005, Clinton Park was served by Clinton Park Elementary School at 129 Mississippi Road.[138][139] After spring 2005, Clinton Park Elementary School closed because it had a too small enrollment; its final enrollment was 148 students. The students were moved to Pleasantville Elementary School. Josephine Espree, a teacher at Clinton Park, said that the school closing was like a "death in the family" for the community.[140] Edwin Davis, president of the Clinton Park Civic Club, criticized the closing of the school.[141]
  • Concord Elementary School (Later became Concord Early Childhood Center)
  • Cooley Elementary School (300 West 17th, Closed 1980 - The building, now the Cooley Center, is the headquarters of HISD's alternative certification program.[54])
  • Joseph H. Crawford Elementary School (Houston)
  • Julius Dodson Elementary School (Houston) [15] (opened in 1921 as Bowie Elementary School[54])
  • Frederick Douglass Elementary School (3000 Trulley Street, Houston, 77004) (Closed spring 2005, Students rezoned to Dodson ES - The campus later became New Orleans West, a charter school for Hurricane Katrina evacuees from New Orleans (named after Frederick Douglass))
  • Dow Elementary School (1900 Kane, closed around 1991-1993[54][144])
  • Dunbar Elementary School (2202 St. Emanuel, Closed 1981) - Established on the campus of former Longfellow Junior High School in 1961
  • Rosa Lee Easter Elementary School (4435 Weaver, closed in summer 2006, Students rezoned to Cook ES)
  • Eighth Avenue Elementary School (727 Waverly Street, Houston, 77077) (Closed spring 2004, Students rezoned to Love ES)
  • Thorton M. Fairchild Elementary School (8701 Delilah, Houston, 77033) (Opened fall 1959, closed May 24, 2007)
  • Fannin Elementary School (2900 Louisiana, Houston, closed 1971[54])
  • Maud W. Gordon Elementary School (Bellaire) (Unzoned relief school)
  • Buchanan H. Grimes Elementary School (Houston)
  • Hawthorne Elementary School (1417 Houston Avenue, Opened 1893 at former Houston Avenue School location, Closed 1959[54])
  • Henry L. Hohl Elementary School (Houston)
    • Hohl closed by 2011; students were rezoned to Highland Heights Elementary School and other schools.[8]
  • Holden Elementary School (812 West 28th Street, Houston, 77008) (Closed spring 2004,[54] students rezoned to Helms ES and Sinclair ES)
  • Anson Jones Elementary School (2311 Canal Street, Houston, 77003-1518) (Closed spring 2006, students rezoned to Bruce ES and Rusk ES)
    • Served the Second Ward, other parts of the East End, and a section of Downtown Houston[148]
    • Anson Jones opened in 1892 as the Elysian Street School; its first campus was destroyed in a fire, and that was replaced in 1893 with a three-story building at 914 Elysian in what is now Downtown. It was named after Anson Jones in 1902. In the 1950s many students resided in Clayton Homes, a Houston Housing Authority public housing complex, and the students were majority Hispanic and Latino. In 1962 it had 609 students. Anson Jones moved to a new campus in the Second Ward in 1966, and its original campus in Downtown was demolished.[149] In 1967,[150] A. Jones moved to a new location on Canal Street.[151] In several decades leading up to 2006, the school lost population. Charles Ross, the school's final principal, who had served in that capacity for 14 years, said that the school lost about 200 students during his term. As of the 2005-2006 school year, it had a little over 200 students. The student population was mostly Hispanic and African American. Two thirds of the students lived in Clayton Homes.[150] The A. Jones school closed in 2006.[151] HISD sold the building.[150] The areas formerly zoned to the school were rezoned to the Bruce and Rusk schools.[151][152][153][154] The cafeteria of the former school became a reception hall.[155] Offices of the Urban Harvest organization are now located in Suite 200 of the former school.[156]
  • J. Will Jones Elementary School (Houston)
    • Served portions of Midtown and the Third Ward[157]
    • J. Will Jones Elementary School, located in Midtown, received an unacceptable academic rating from the Texas Education Agency. Under principal Brian Flores, the school's test scores increased in a five-year period until 2009. Around 2009 the school provided bus services to several homeless shelters within the school's attendance zone.[158] As of 2009, over 1/3rd of Jones's students were homeless.[159] About 100 of the around 300 students were homeless, and about 30 came from a Salvation Army shelter. Flores said that this was the highest number of homeless students during his career as a principal at Jones.[160] In 2008 99% of the students were on free or reduced lunch. Every year the school held its "Gift of Giving" ceremony.[161]
    • Before the start of the 2009-2010 school year Jones was consolidated into Blackshear Elementary School, a campus in the Third Ward.[67][68] During its final year of enrollment J. Will Jones had more students than Blackshear. Many J. Will Jones parents referred to Blackshear as "that prison school" and said that they will not send their children to Blackshear. Jones was scheduled to house Houston Community College classes after its closure as a school.[162] Supporters of keeping J. Will Jones created a campaign to try to keep J. Will Jones open.[158] The Jones campus became the campus of Houston Academy for International Studies.[163] Blackshear and Gregory-Lincoln elementary took portions of J. Will Jones's former territory in Midtown.[164][165]
  • Kay Elementary School (Opened in 1904 at 7621 Elm as Harrisburg School, renamed and moved to 1616 Hebert in 1952, Closed 1978[54])
  • Lamar Elementary School (2209 Gentry Street, Houston, 77009-8196) (Closed spring 2002, School replaced by Ketelsen ES (named after Mirabeau B. Lamar))
  • Langston Elementary School (Opened in 1905 as Breckenridge Elementary School, renamed in 1955, closed in fall 1991, later became Langston Early Childhood Center[54][144])
  • Robert E. Lee Elementary School (2101 South Street, Houston, 77009) (Closed spring 2002, School replaced by Ketelsen ES (named after Robert E. Lee))
  • Lubbock Elementary School (412 Sampson, Closed 1969[54])
  • Charles W. Luckie Elementary School (1104 Palmer, Closed c. 1943,[54] a school for African-Americans[168])
  • General Douglas B. MacArthur Elementary School (Houston)
    • Was consolidated with Peck Elementary. A replacement campus on the Peck site was scheduled to open in Spring 2011.[71][93]
  • Jesse C. McDade Elementary School (Houston)
  • McGowan Elementary School
  • Milam Elementary School (1100 Roy Street, Houston, 77077) (named after Ben Milam)
    • It opened as Brunner High School, a part of the Brunner Independent School District, in 1912. Brunner ISD merged into Houston schools in 1913-1914 and it was converted into a grade 1-9 school, West End Junior High School. It was renamed to Ben Milam Elementary after junior high grades were moved to George Washington Junior High School in September 1926. In December 1977 the building closed as it had received significant damage; a replacement campus opened in August 1980. From 1977 to 1980 students attended school at Doris Miller.[169] In April 2004 the HISD board voted to close Milam, rezoning its students to Memorial.[170] As of 2007 Milam was being used as office space for the HISD administration.[171] By 2011 Milam was converted into a private preschool.[172]
  • Miller Elementary School (5216 Feagan, closed 1977)
  • Montrose Elementary School[173] (opened 1913, closed prior to 1981[citation needed])
  • Pleasants Elementary School (opened 1967, closed June 1991, now home to Pleasant Hill Academy[54][144])
  • School At Post Oak (Houston) (Post Oak had no boundary; it was a reliever school for Briargrove)
  • Joseph James Rhoads Elementary School (Houston)
  • Will Rogers Elementary School (3101 Weslayan Street, Houston, 77027) (opened fall 1950, closed spring 2006, Students rezoned to Poe ES and St. George Place ES (named after Will Rogers))
  • J. D. Ryan Elementary School (4001 Hardy Street, Houston, 77009) (closed spring 2005, Students rezoned to Jefferson ES and Looscan ES)
    • In northern Houston, Ryan was previously a mostly African-American school. Circa 1970-1972 the student body included about 258 Mexican-Americans.[175]
    • After closure it was used as a temporary school for Hurricane Katrina evacuees.[176]
    • Ryan is now the Ryan Professional Support & Development Center[177]
  • Sanderson Elementary School (7115 Lockwood Drive, Houston, 77016) (closed spring 2006 - formed Cook ES)
  • Sands Point Elementary School (Houston) (Unzoned relief school, opened in 1998 - Located within the Institute of Chinese Culture,[54] and later the Chinese Consulate, closed in 2009[178])
  • Emmett J. Scott Elementary School (Houston)
    • In 1998 Article Hedgemon, the principal, said that most of the school's students had limited English proficiency. In 1998 Scott received an exemplary rating from the TEA. 44% of its students did not take the TAAS. Another 4% took the test, but had their scores exempted.[64]
    • By Spring 2011 Dogan and Scott were scheduled to be consolidated, with a new campus in the Scott site.[8]
  • Sharpview Elementary School (7734 Mary Bates Boulevard, Houston, 77036) (opened fall 2000, closed spring 2004) - The district rented space from a Buddhist Temple[54]
  • Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary School (Houston)
    • It was named after Robert Louis Stevenson The school opened in 1915 as Cottage Grove High School. In 1927 the school was remodeled and given its final name.[54] According to Lisa Sacaris, the educational liaison of the Cottage Grove Civic Association, the school had a capacity of around 450 students.[179] Around 2007, the school district considered closing Stevenson.[179] Sacaris added that the school was just beginning to attract families with young children before the school district announced a plan to close the school. The community was creating a plan to recruit additional families to the school.[180] In May 2011 the school had 357 students. At that time the school district proposed closing the school and rezoning children to Memorial and Love Elementary Schools in order to cut costs.[172] Sacaris, who stated her opposition to the closure,[179] argued that the plan would not reduce costs because the district would have to spend more money to send school buses to send children to more distant schools.[172] Sacaris also said that InTown Homes's plans to build 230 houses in the Stevenson attendance zone and the school's "Leader In Me Academy" are reasons to keep the school open.[172] Jane West, the president of the superneighborhood that includes Cottage Grove, said that the school district would need the school's capacity within several years. West also stated that after the district closed nearby Ben Milam Elementary School, it was converted into a private preschool.[172] The school district closed Stevenson in 2011. The post-closure preliminary Texas Education Agency 2011 rating was "Exemplary." The school district promoted the already-closed school as one of the 59 HISD schools that received exemplary ratings. The TEA ratings of Memorial and Love decreased from 2010 to 2011. Sacaris said that the news was "bittersweet."[181]
  • Sugar Grove Elementary School (Houston) (Unzoned relief school)
    • Established in 1994, it was named after a church that previously was located where the Sugar Grove campus was built. In was established in 1994 and was converted into a zoned middle school, Sugar Grove Academy, in 2008.[182]
  • George Turner Elementary School (Houston)
    • Turner closed in 2009, consolidated into Lockhart. By Spring 2011 a new campus was to be built in the Lockhart site.[8] The HISD board had approved the consolidation on November 12, 2008 despite the opposition of Sheila Jackson Lee and Sammye Prince Hughes, the head of the Turner parent-teacher organization and the president of the Southwood Civic Club.[73] In 2009 Turner, which occupied a building from the 1920s, had 259 students.[183]

Other former schools:

  • 3-D Academy (Became a state charter in 2005 and as of 2008 is associated with KIPP)[54]
  • Banneker-McNair Math/Science Academy (Houston)
  • Diversity Roots And Wings Academy (Draw) (3920 Stoney Brook Drive, 77063) (Houston, Opened 2001, became a state charter in 2004)[54]
  • Dominion Academy (Houston) - Closed 2012 [16]
  • Kazi Shule (Houston) - Kazi Shule is an alternative school for pupils with behavioral problems. It opened as a middle school but became an elementary school in 2001 for the 2001-2002 school year. Closed May 2006.[54]
  • YMCA Of Greater Houston Charter School (ended affiliation with HISD in 2004,[54] Houston)
  • Mount Hebron Academy (Houston) - Mount Hebron is an alternative school for pupils with behavioral problems. - Closed Summer 2006[54]

References[edit]

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