Bridge No. 4 (La Crosse, Wisconsin)

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Bridge No. 4
McGilvray Road Bridge No. 4, Van Loon Wildlife Area, La Crosse vicinity (La Crosse County, Wisconsin).jpg
Bridge No. 4 (La Crosse, Wisconsin) is located in Wisconsin
Bridge No. 4 (La Crosse, Wisconsin)
Bridge No. 4 (La Crosse, Wisconsin) is located in the US
Bridge No. 4 (La Crosse, Wisconsin)
Nearest city La Crosse, Wisconsin
Coordinates 44°1′24″N 91°19′14″W / 44.02333°N 91.32056°W / 44.02333; -91.32056Coordinates: 44°1′24″N 91°19′14″W / 44.02333°N 91.32056°W / 44.02333; -91.32056
Area 0.7 acres (0.28 ha)
Built 1902
Built by Clinton Bridge Company
Architectural style Bowstring Arch Truss Bridge
MPS Van Loon Wildlife Area Truss Bridge TR
NRHP Reference # 80000149[1]
Added to NRHP February 27, 1980

Bridge No. 4, near La Crosse, Wisconsin, United States, was built in 1902. It is a Bowstring arch truss bridge built by the Clinton Bridge Company. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.[1]

It is one of seven bridges built during 1891-92 by the Clinton Bridge Company, of Clinton, Iowa, to bring a La Crosse County road through backwaters of the Black River and then cross the Black River itself, connecting the city of La Crosse with rural Trempeleau County. All seven were bowstring arch truss bridges, but one was replaced by a kingpost truss bridge nine years after being damaged in 1911. The kingpost one and all but the main bridge spanning the Black River itself survived in 1979.[2]

The Black River had previously been crossed by a ferry started by Alex McGilvray in 1861.[2]

The bridge consists of two spans, and is 17 feet (5.2 m) wide and 131 feet (40 m) long. It has a concrete deck. Its steel was from the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. The tension members of the bridge "are a combination of round and square eye-bars with the eyes made by looping over and welding the end of the bar."[2]:2[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c Patricia Marks (June 1979). "National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation: Van Loon Wildlife Area Truss Bridge TR" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  3. ^ There is not a separate NRHP nomination available for the bridge, but there is a photo from 1979.

External link[edit]