Burlington High School (Vermont)

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For other schools of a similar name, see Burlington High School.
Burlington High School
Location
52 Institute Road,
Burlington, Vermont,
United States
Coordinates 44°29′47″N 73°14′09″W / 44.496459°N 73.235732°W / 44.496459; -73.235732Coordinates: 44°29′47″N 73°14′09″W / 44.496459°N 73.235732°W / 44.496459; -73.235732
Information
Type Public high school
Motto Freedom Through Education
Established 1964
School district Burlington School District
Principal Tracy Racicot
Grades 912
Number of students 976
Color(s)      Navy
     White
Team name Seahorse
Newspaper The BHS Register
Website

Burlington High School (BHS) is a public high school located in Burlington, Vermont, United States. BHS' current (since 1964) campus is its fourth. Two of the former buildings still exist, one (1900–1964) as the Edmunds Elementary and Middle School complex while the second one, used in the late 1800s, is now a private residence.

Student life[edit]

Community service[edit]

Each student of BHS is expected to complete 40 hours of community service over his or her academic career. Community service fairs have been held at the school, with information about local organizations which need volunteers. A blood drive is hosted twice a year, with donation limited to students over age 16.[1]

Curriculum[edit]

Burlington High School requires the typical 24 credit load to graduate: 4 mandatory English, 3 mandatory science, 3 mandatory history, 3 mandatory math, 1 or 2 foreign languages (including French, German, Chinese, Spanish, and Latin) most reach level 2, 1/2 health, 1 and 1/2 gym, and 1 art or music (including band, chorus, clay, metals, and others). After these requirements have been completed, students are left with 5 elective credits to choose, which can span any of the aforementioned subjects.

Recognition[edit]

15 graduates qualified for National Merit Scholarships in 2008.[2]

Campus[edit]

Burlington High School is composed of 5 main buildings, labeled A, B, C, D, and E. There is also an F building, which contains Burlington Technical Center (BTC), a regional technical center that is attended by students from BHS as well as other high schools in the county. A building is the largest; it houses the school's cafeteria, gymnasium, music department, auditorium, and a few classrooms. B building is occupied by foreign-language and art classrooms, with the school's library on the first floor. C building is occupied by the English and the history departments, while E building is used by the mathematics and science departments. D building contains mostly exploratory programs, such as computer literacy and health.

Newspaper[edit]

Burlington High School is known throughout the community for its excellent journalism program, which produces The BHS Register, a bi-weekly newspaper published in print and online. The program has produced four Al Neuharth Free Spirit Journalism Scholars over the past 10 years. The paper's extensive coverage of the teacher contract negotiations in fall 2016 was highly regarded.

Sports[edit]

The sports teams include cross country, alpine, basketball, field hockey, hockey, lacrosse, baseball, softball, tennis, football, soccer, track (including indoor track), and "longboat" (Cornish pilot gig) racing.[3]

Recognition[edit]

  • The basketball team won the Division 1 state championship in 2001, 2003, 2006, 2008, and 2016.[4]
    • In 2007–08 they won all 24 games, the first Division I team in Vermont to have a perfect season in 25 years.[5]
    • The team had a 37-game winning streak as of January 2009. The team was 59–2 since fall 2006. The only losses were to Rice.[6] Rice's 6 losses in the same timeframe have been in games with BHS.
  • The boys' tennis team won the Div. 1 championship in 1998, 1999, 2005 and 2006.
  • Boys' baseball Division I state champions 1966, 1969, 1979, 1983, 1984[7]
  • Football team won Division I in 1967 and 1970.[8]
  • The football team won the Div. 2 state championship in 1964, 1974, 1999 and 2006[8]
  • Lacrosse won the Div. 2 title in 2007 and 2016[9]
  • Boys' soccer Division I 1987, 1996,[10] 1997[11] and 2008[12]
  • Boys' tennis Division I 1972, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2006[13]
  • Girls' tennis Division I 1979 and 1980[13]
  • Girls' Division I soccer state champions 2008[12]
  • Boys' Indoor Track Division 1 state indoor track champions, Winter 2009
  • Boys' Outdoor Track Division 1 state outdoor track champions, Spring 2009
  • Boys' Division 1 Hockey won the state championship in 1971, 1972, 1985 and 1998.
  • Boys' Ski Team won several state championships and were New England Champions in 1972.
  • Boys' Cross-Country Team went undefeated 72–0 in regular season meets over several years in the early 1970s. They won Vermont State Championship titles in 1948–1950, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1970–1972, 1978, 1981, 1982. In 1972 the team tied for 2nd place at New England Championships and were 2nd again in 1982.[14]
  • Girls' Cross Country Team has won state championships in 1971, 1972, 1982 and 2002.
  • Girls' lacrosse won the Division 1 title in 2015

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-04-21. Retrieved 2011-10-20. 
  2. ^ Burlington High School website
  3. ^ Ober, Lauren (November 21, 2008). High school longboat team competes in first season. Burlington Free Press. 
  4. ^ VBCA Info Archived July 5, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. accessed January 5, 2008
  5. ^ Horses enjoy perfect season. Burlington Free Press. December 26, 2008. 
  6. ^ Donoghue, Mike (January 13, 2009). BHS: Seahorses rally for win over Rice. Burlington Free Press. 
  7. ^ Vermont Principals' Association accessed January 5, 2008
  8. ^ a b Vermont Principal's Association accessed January 5, 2008
  9. ^ Fantino, John A. (June 9, 2007). Seahorses' surge nets Division II title. Burlington Free Press. 
  10. ^ Tie with Essex
  11. ^ Vermont Principals' Association accessed January 5, 2008
  12. ^ a b Donoghue, Mike (November 2, 2008). BHS weaves sweep. Burlington Free Press. 
  13. ^ a b Vermont Principals' Association Archived May 13, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. accessed January 5, 2008
  14. ^ http://www.vpaonline.org/cms/lib6/VT08001199/Centricity/Domain/11/Non-Title%20Game%20Champs.pdf