Capp Street Project

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Capp Street Project was established as an experimental art space in 1983 in San Francisco, California and was the first visual arts residency in the United States dedicated solely to the creation and presentation of new art installations and conceptual art.[1] The Capp Street Project name and concept has existed since 1983, although the physical space which the residency and exhibition program occupied has changed several times. In 1998 Capp Street Project united with California College of the ArtsWattis Institute for Contemporary Arts.[2] In 2014 Wattis celebrated 30 years of Capp Street Project Art.[3]

History[edit]

In 1983, Capp Street Project was created by Ann Hatch who acquired a David Ireland designed house at 65 Capp Street in San Francisco.[4] Although Hatch's original intention was to preserve the house as a work of art, a personal inquiry concerning patronage and the desire to nurture non-traditional art making processes, ultimately led in another direction. The artist-in-residency program was created and became central to Capp Street Project.

Capp Street Project became part of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts which is in turn part of the California College of the Arts in 1998 and the house at 65 Capp Street returned to the public sector.[4][5] As a program of Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts it is currently run by Anthony Huberman, the Director since 2013.[6] Since its inception, Capp Street Project gave more than 100 local, national, and international artists the opportunity to create new work through its residency and public exhibition programs.

Artists[edit]

Some past Capp Street Artists and their projects[edit]

Glen Seator, 1997. Seator's Approach was a full-scale indoor re-creation of the street and sidewalk outside Capp Street Project and of the street-facing facade of the gallery's first floor. Writing in the summer 1997 issue of ArtNews, critic Kenneth Baker called Seator's installation "one of the great gallery shows in this city's history." Seator's large-scale architectural installations have won international acclaim.[citation needed]

Ann Hamilton, 1989. In Privation and Excesses, Hamilton used 700,000 pennies, among other materials, to create a poetic exploration of systems and mediums of exchange. The installation was featured on the cover of Artforum, a career-making event for the artist.[7]

Bill Viola, 1989. Viola's installation Sanctuary combined video, earth, and redwood trees to create an urban refuge. A renowned video artist, Viola was also awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship in 1989.[citation needed]

Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, 1987. In the Drawing Room: versions and subversions, the collaborators—who also have an architectural practice—explored themes of domesticity, architecture, the home, and the body of the imagined resident of the installation.[citation needed]

Border Arts Workshop/Taller de Arte Fronterizo (BAW/TAF), was a San Diego-based art collective included artists; Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Emily Hicks, Bertha Jottar, Richard Lou, Victor Ochoa, Robert Sanchez, Michael Schnorr and Rocío Weiss. In their 1989 exhibition Border Axes they created a communications network with modern equipment including fax machines, Xerox machines, an 800 phone line, and video equipment in hopes of dissolving the borders between the US and Mexico with alternative ways of communicating and collecting news.[8][9]

List of artists[edit]

This is a list in alphabetical order of artists who have participated in the residency.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About CSP - Capp Street Project Archive". California College of the Arts. Retrieved 9 February 2016. 
  2. ^ Helfand, Glen. "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition". ArtForum. Artforum International Magazine. Retrieved 10 February 2016. 
  3. ^ Garchik, Leah. "CCA marks 30 years of Capp Street Project art". SFGATE. Hearst Communications, Inc. Retrieved 10 February 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "About CSP". Capp Street Project Archive. Retrieved 2016-03-07. 
  5. ^ "Capp Street Project Archive". libraries.cca.edu. Retrieved 2016-01-15. 
  6. ^ Bliss, Chris (2013-03-14). "Anthony Huberman Appointed Director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts". California College of the Arts. Retrieved 2016-02-03. 
  7. ^ a b "Ann Hamilton, Capp Street Project" (PDF). CCA Libraries. Retrieved 2015-01-15. 
  8. ^ "Border Lines: The Border Arts Workshop Goes High Tech". Robert Atkins. Village Voice News. 1989-09-26. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  9. ^ a b "Border Art Workshop - Capp Street Project Archive". libraries.cca.edu. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h "Capp Street Artists". CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  11. ^ "Maryanne Amacher". Foundation for Contemporary Arts. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  12. ^ "Larry Andrews". Capp Street Project Archive, CCA Libraries. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  13. ^ "The Art Guys At Capp Street Project" (PDF). CCA Libraries. 1995. Retrieved 2016-02-04. 
  14. ^ "Off Broadway". California College of the Arts. Retrieved 15 February 2016. 
  15. ^ a b "Jim Campbell & Marie Navarre". Capp Street Project Archive, CCA Libraries. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  16. ^ a b "Kate Ericson & Mel Ziegler - Capp Street Project Archive". Libraries CCA. Retrieved 2016-03-12. 
  17. ^ "Mona Hatoum by Janine Antoni". BOMB Magazine. Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  18. ^ "Celia Alvarez Munoz - Capp Street Project Archive". libraries.cca.edu. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 
  19. ^ Kenney, Laura. "Carissa Rodriguez Solo Exhibition at the CCA Wattis Institute December 8 - February 10". California College of the Arts. Retrieved 15 February 2016. 

External links[edit]

37°45′57″N 122°25′06″W / 37.76578°N 122.41841°W / 37.76578; -122.41841