Dibromochloromethane

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Dibromochloromethane
Skeletal formula of dibromochloromethane
Spacefill model of dibromochloromethane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Dibromo(chloro)methane
Other names
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Abbreviations CDBM[citation needed]
1731046
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.004.277
EC Number 204-704-0
KEGG
MeSH chlorodibromomethane
RTECS number PA6360000
Properties
CHBr2Cl
Molar mass 208.28 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Density 2.451 g mL−1
Melting point −22 °C (−8 °F; 251 K)
Boiling point 119 to 120 °C (246 to 248 °F; 392 to 393 K) at 99.7 kPa
log P 2.206
8.6 μmol Pa−1 kg−1
-75.1·10−6 cm3/mol
1.547
Hazards
GHS pictograms The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word WARNING
H302
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
370 mg kg−1 (oral, rat)
Related compounds
Related alkanes
Related compounds
2-Chloroethanol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Dibromochloromethane is a colorless to yellow, heavy and nonflammable compound with formula CHBr
2
Cl
.[1][2] It is a trihalomethane. The substance has a sweet odour.[3] Small quantities of dibromochloromethane are produced in ocean by algae.

Applications[edit]

Dibromochloromethane was formerly used as a flame retardant and as an intermediate in chemicals manufacturing. Today it is used only as a laboratory reagent. Dibromochloromethane is also a disinfection byproduct, formed by the reaction of chlorine with natural organic matter and bromide ions in the raw water supply. As a result, it is commonly found in chlorinated drinking water.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dibromochloromethane". Sigma Aldrich. sigmaaldrich.com. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  2. ^ "Public Health Statement for Bromoform and Dibromochloromethane". atsdr.cdc.gov. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  3. ^ "BROMOFORM AND DIBROMOCHLOROMETHANE" (PDF). atsdr.cdc.gov. Retrieved 7 June 2017.

External links[edit]