Trichlorofluoromethane

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Trichlorofluoromethane
Trichlorofluoromethane-2D.svg
Trichlorofluoromethane-3D-vdW.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Trichloro(fluoro)methane
Other names
Trichlorofluoromethane
Fluorotrichloromethane
Fluorochloroform
Freon 11
CFC 11
R 11
Arcton 9
Freon 11A
Freon 11B
Freon HE
Freon MF
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.812
EC Number 200-892-3
RTECS number TB6125000
UNII
Properties
CCl3F
Molar mass 137.36 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid/gas
Odor nearly odorless[1]
Density 1.494 g/cm3
Melting point −110.48 °C (−166.86 °F; 162.67 K)
Boiling point 23.77 °C (74.79 °F; 296.92 K)
1.1 g/L (at 20 °C)
log P 2.53
Vapor pressure 89 kPa at 20 °C
131 kPa at 30 °C
Hazards
Safety data sheet See: data page
ICSC 0047
Flash point Non-flammable
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
26,200 ppm (rat, 4 hr)
100,000 ppm (rat, 20 min)
100,000 ppm (rat, 2 hr)[2]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 1000 ppm (5600 mg/m3)[1]
REL (Recommended)
C 1000 ppm (5600 mg/m3)[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
2000 ppm[1]
Supplementary data page
Refractive index (n),
Dielectric constantr), etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
solid–liquid–gas
UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Trichlorofluoromethane, also called freon-11, CFC-11, or R-11, is a chlorofluorocarbon. It is a colorless, faint ethereal, and sweetish-odor liquid that boils around room temperature.

Uses[edit]

It was the first widely used refrigerant. Because of its high boiling point (compared to most refrigerants), it can be used in systems with a low operating pressure, making the mechanical design of such systems less demanding than that of higher-pressure refrigerants R-12 or R-22.

R-11 is assigned an ozone depletion potential of 1.0, and U.S. production was ended in January 1, 1996.

Trichlorofluoromethane is used as a reference compound for fluorine-19 NMR studies.

Prior to the knowledge of the ozone depletion potential of chlorine in refrigerants and other possible harmful effects on the environment, trichlorofluoromethane was sometimes used as a cleaning/rinsing agent for low-pressure systems.[citation needed]

Trichloromethane was formerly used in the drinking bird novelty, largely because it has a boiling point of 74.79 F. The replacement, dichloromethane, boiling point 103.3 F, requires a higher ambient temperature to work.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]