Dalvin Cook

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Dalvin Cook
refer to caption
Cook while at FSU in 2014
No. 33 – Minnesota Vikings
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born: (1995-08-10) August 10, 1995 (age 24)
Opa-locka, Florida
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Miami Central
(West Little River, Florida)
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:2017 / Round: 2 / Pick: 41
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 15, 2019
Rushing yards:2,077
Rushing average:4.6
Rushing touchdowns:17
Receptions:101
Receiving yards:898
Receiving touchdowns:2
Player stats at NFL.com

Dalvin James Cook (born August 10, 1995) is an American football running back for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida State, where he finished his career as the school's all-time leading rusher. Cook was drafted by the Vikings in the second round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

High school career[edit]

Born in West Little River, Florida, Cook attended Miami Central High School, the same as former Seminole and current Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowl running back Devonta Freeman.[1] Cook did not join the football program until his sophomore year, figuring he had no chance to supplant senior running back Devonta Freeman, who led Central to a Class 6A state title in 2010. Cook played as a running back and defensive back under coach Telly Lockette. In his junior year, he shared carries with Joseph Yearby, who is his best friend. On running downs, Yearby played wildcat quarterback and Cook lined up at running back. As a senior in 2013, Cook rushed for a county-best 1,940 yards and 34 touchdowns on 177 carries (11.0 yards per rush) and intercepted three passes on defense. In Central's Class 6A regional final win against Palm Bay Heritage, Cook ran for 244 yards and three touchdowns as Yearby fractured his fibula in the first quarter of the game. From that point on, Cook led his team to the Class 6A state championship by rushing for 223 yards and four touchdowns in a 52–7 win over Seffner Armwood, helping the Rockets win their third state championship in the past four seasons and become the first Dade team to advance to four consecutive state finals. For his season efforts, Cook was named Mr. Florida Football by the Florida Dairy Farmers Association, becoming the third recipient of the award since its inception (back in 1992) from Miami-Dade County, joining former Miami Northwestern quarterback Jacory Harris and former Miami Norland running back Duke Johnson.[2] Cook finished his prep career with 4,267 rushing yards and 64 touchdowns, while leading Miami Central to a 52–5 record. His senior season accolades included USA Today All-USA Football Team, 247Sports Second Team All-American and All-State Class 6A first-team. Following his senior season, Cook was invited to play at the 2014 Under Armour All-America Game, where he rushed for 78 yards and a touchdown on just eight carries for Team Nitro.[3] Cook also participated in "The Opening", an all-star summer prospect camp held on the Nike Campus.

In track & field, Cook was one of the state's top sprinters. He recorded a personal-best time of 22.10 seconds in the 200-meter dash at the 2013 Sam Burley Invitational, where he placed 13th.[4] At the 2013 FHSAA 3A Region 4, he ran the third leg on the Miami Central 4 × 100 m relay and 4 × 400 m relay squads, helping them win both events with times of 41.15 seconds and 3:17.58 minutes, respectively.[5] In the preliminary rounds of the 2013 GMAC North Qualifier, he was clocked at 10.08 seconds (heavily wind-aided) in the 100-meter dash, but would later run a 10.92 to earn a fifth-place finish in the finals.[6]

Regarded as a five-star recruit by Rivals.com, Cook was ranked as the second best all-purpose back in his class.[7] Before he signed with Florida State in January 2014, he had already taken the summer and night classes necessary to graduate high school early and enroll in the spring. Cook originally committed to Clemson University, then flipped to the University of Florida under coach Will Muschamp in the spring of 2013.[8][9] However, after Florida’s 4–8 season that year, the 5-star running back began wavering on his pledge—privately. Despite officially visiting other schools, Cook claimed he was "100 percent" committed to the University of Florida in every interview.[citation needed] During the week of the Under Armour All-America Game, he did the Gator Chomp on social media and posed for a pictures with Florida commits after one of the practices.[10] On January 1, 2014, Cook flipped to Florida State University.[11]

College career[edit]

Cook attended and played college football at Florida State from 2014 to 2016 under head coach Jimbo Fisher.[12]

Cook split carries with Karlos Williams and Mario Pender as a true freshman in 2014.[13] In his first game against The Citadel, he rushed 67 yards with one touchdown.[14] He rushed for 100 yards for the first time in his college career against Syracuse, gaining 122 yards over 23 carries with a touchdown.[15][16][17] Cook was named the MVP of the 2014 ACC Championship Game against Georgia Tech after earning a career-high 177 yards on 31 carries and one rushing touchdown.[18][19] Overall, in the 2014 season, he finished with 1,008 rushing yards, eight rushing touchdowns, 22 receptions, and 203 receiving yards.[20]

In July 2015, Cook was suspended after he was charged with battery following an incident outside a bar.[21] The following month, he was found not guilty and reinstated by Florida State.[22] He started the season off strong with 156 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown against Texas State.[23] In the next game, against South Florida, he had 266 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns.[24] On October 10, against the Miami Hurricanes, he had 222 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns to go along with 47 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown to help the Seminoles to a 5–0 record.[25] During the team's tenth game, which was against NC State, Cook broke Warrick Dunn's Florida State single-season rushing yards record of 1,242.[26] In the annual rivalry game against the Florida Gators, he had 183 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[27] Overall, he finished the 2015 season with 1,691 rushing yards, 19 rushing touchdowns, 24 receptions, 244 receiving yards, and one receiving touchdown.[28]

Cook started the 2016 season with 91 rushing yards and 101 receiving yards in a victory over Ole Miss.[29] On September 24, against South Florida, he had 267 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns to go along with 62 receiving yards.[30] In the next game, against North Carolina, he had 140 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns to go along with six receptions for 106 yards.[31] On November 19, 2016, during the first quarter of the team's game against the Syracuse Orange, Cook broke Warrick Dunn's career rushing record of 3,959 yards. Cook entered the game just 18 yards behind the record and finished with 225 rushing yards and four rushing touchdowns.[32][33] He finished his career with 4,464 rushing yards.[34] A few hours after winning the Orange Bowl against Michigan, Cook announced he would forgo his senior season at Florida State in order to enter the 2017 NFL Draft.[35][36]

College statistics[edit]

NCAA Collegiate Career statistics
Florida State Seminoles
Season Rushing Receiving Scrimmage
Att Yards Avg TDs Rec Yards Avg TDs Plays Yards Avg TDs
2014 170 1,008 5.9 8 22 203 9.2 0 192 1,211 6.3 8
2015 229 1,691 7.4 19 24 244 10.2 1 253 1,935 7.6 20
2016 288 1,765 6.1 19 33 488 14.8 1 321 2,253 7.0 20
NCAA Career Totals 687 4,464 6.5 46 79 935 11.8 2 766 5,399 7.0 48

Professional career[edit]

Cook received an invitation to the NFL combine and completed all of the required combine drills and positional drills. He participated at Florida State's Pro Day and ran the 40-yard dash, 20-yard dash, 10-yard dash, and positional drills. He was ranked the top running back in the draft by Sports Illustrated and Pro Football Focus, the second best running back by NFL media analyst Bucky Brooks, and the third best running back by NFLDraftScout.com and NFL analyst Mike Mayock.[37][38][39][40] Although he was considered to be one of the top running backs, off-the-field problems, prior arrests, character concerns, fumbling issues, and a history of shoulder injuries caused his stock to fall.[41] NFL draft experts and analysts projected Cook to be selected in the first or second round of the draft.

External video
Cook performing at the NFL Combine
Cook gets drafted by Minnesota
Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP Wonderlic
5 ft 10 38 in
(1.79 m)
210 lb
(95 kg)
32 38 in
(0.82 m)
9 14 in
(0.23 m)
4.49 s 1.59 s 2.63 s 4.53 s 7.27 s 30 12 in
(0.77 m)
9 ft 8 in
(2.95 m)
22 reps 11
All values are from NFL Combine and Florida State's Pro Day[38]

The Minnesota Vikings selected Cook in the second round (41st overall) of the 2017 NFL Draft. The Cincinnati Bengals traded the 41st overall pick to the Vikings for their second round draft selection (No. 48) and their fourth-round selection (No. 128). He was the third running back taken in the draft behind Leonard Fournette (fourth overall) and Christian McCaffrey (eighth overall).[42][43]

2017 season: Rookie year[edit]

In his first NFL game against the New Orleans Saints, Cook set the Vikings' rookie debut rushing record, previously held by Adrian Peterson by rushing for 127 yards on 22 carries.[44] In Week 3, against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he had 27 carries for 97 yards and a touchdown to go along with five receptions for 72 yards.[45] During Week 4 against the Detroit Lions, Cook left the game with an apparent knee injury. The next day, it was revealed that Cook suffered a torn ACL, and it prematurely ended his rookie season.[46] He was officially placed on injured reserve on October 5, 2017.[47] In four games in his rookie year, Cook finished with 354 rushing yards.[48] On October 9, 2017, Cook underwent successful repair of the left ACL. Noted Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews of Gulf Breeze, Florida noted no further damage of the left knee with "100 percent," chance of return for the 2018 season.[49]

2018 season[edit]

In the season opener, his first game back from injury, Cook had 95 scrimmage yards in the 24–16 victory over the San Francisco 49ers.[50] In Week 15 of the 2018 season, Cook rushed for 136 yards and two touchdowns in a 41–17 win over the Miami Dolphins, earning him NFC Offensive Player of the Week.[51]

Cook finished the 2018 season with 615 rushing yards and two touchdowns. He also caught 40 receptions for 305 yards and two touchdowns.[52]

2019 season[edit]

In the season-opener against the Atlanta Falcons, Cook rushed 21 times for 111 yards and two touchdowns as the Vikings won 28–12.[53] During Week 2 against the Green Bay Packers, Cook rushed for 154 yards, which included a 75-yard touchdown run as the Vikings lost 16–21.[54] In Week 3 against the Oakland Raiders, Cook rushed 16 times for 110 yards and one touchdown and caught four passes for 33 yards as the Vikings won 34–14. [55] During Week 5 against the New York Giants, Cook finished with 132 rushing yards along with 86 receiving yards, bringing it to 218 total yards as the Vikings won 28–10. [56] During Week 7 against the Detroit Lions, Cook finished with 142 rushing yards and 2 touchdowns as the Vikings won 42–30. [57] In the next game against the Washington Redskins, Cook rushed 23 times for 98 yards and a touchdown and caught 5 passes for 73 yards in the 19–9 win. [58] During Week 10 against the Dallas Cowboys, Cook rushed 26 times for 97 yards and a touchdown and caught seven passes for 86 yards in the 28–24 road victory.[59] He was named the NFC Offensive Player of the Week for his performance.[60]

NFL statistics[edit]

Year Team Games Rushing Receiving Fumbles
GP GS Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2017 MIN 4 4 74 354 4.8 33 2 11 90 8.2 36 0 1 1
2018 MIN 11 10 133 615 4.6 70 2 40 305 7.6 27 2 2 2
2019 MIN 12 12 223 1,046 4.7 75T 12 45 455 10.1 31 0 2 1
Total 28 25 430 2,077 4.6 75T 16 96 898 8.9 36 2 6 5

Legal issues[edit]

During his freshman year at FSU, Cook was involved in off-field incidents on three occasions. He was charged with criminal mischief after a June BB gun incident that resulted in broken car windows. In July, according to an ESPN report, Cook was named as an "associate" in an assault case of two men the Tallahassee police investigated for allegedly brandishing a firearm at a neighbor; the incident took place at Cook’s apartment.[61] The summer before his sophomore year, Cook was accused of punching a woman outside of a Tallahassee bar after a confrontation and was charged with assault, to which he pled not guilty. A jury found Cook not guilty, and he was able to return to the football team.[62]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Casás, Lucas. "FSU's Dalvin Cook applying lessons learned from prep teammate Devonta Freeman".
  2. ^ "Miami Central RB Dalvin Cook named Florida's Mr. Football". miamiherald. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  3. ^ "Top recruits shine at Under Armour All-America Game".
  4. ^ "Sam Burley Hall of Fame Invitational". flrunners.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  5. ^ "FHSAA 3A Region 4". flrunners.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  6. ^ "GMAC Qualifiers". flrunners.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  7. ^ "Dalvin Cook". yahoo.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  8. ^ "Florida football recruiting: Five-star RB Dalvin Cook flips from Clemson to Gators". SB Nation. April 8, 2013.
  9. ^ Orlando Sentinel (April 6, 2013). "Gators flip Miami Central RB Dalvin Cook from Clemson commitment". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  10. ^ "Miami Central's Dalvin Cook makes final decision, chooses to attend Florida State University". miamiherald. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  11. ^ "No. 20 recruit Dalvin Cook switches from Florida Gators to Florida State Seminoles". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  12. ^ "Dalvin Cook College Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  13. ^ "Florida State Seminoles spring instant impact players: Dalvin Cook – FSU Seminoles – ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  14. ^ Orlando Sentinel (September 7, 2014). "FSU football: Variety of playmakers help fuel FSU's wins over The Citadel – Orlando Sentinel". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  15. ^ Orlando Sentinel (November 18, 2014). "FSU accepts risk that comes with explosive tailback Dalvin Cook". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  16. ^ "Florida State RB Dalvin Cook serves up big plays". jacksonville.com. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  17. ^ "Florida State at Syracuse Box Score, October 11, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  18. ^ "FSU's 'dynamic' Dalvin Cook puts on a show vs. Georgia Tech". miamiherald. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  19. ^ "Florida State vs Georgia Tech Box Score, December 6, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  20. ^ "Dalvin Cook 2014 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  21. ^ "Dalvin Cook facing battery charge, indefinitely suspended by Florida St". ESPN. July 11, 2015.
  22. ^ "Dalvin Cook found not guilty in battery case; FSU lifts suspension". ESPN. August 24, 2015.
  23. ^ "Texas State at Florida State Box Score, September 5, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  24. ^ "South Florida at Florida State Box Score, September 12, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  25. ^ "Miami (FL) at Florida State Box Score, October 10, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  26. ^ Casas, Brendan Sonnone and Lucas. "Dalvin Cook sets FSU's all-time record for rushing yards in a season".
  27. ^ "Florida State at Florida Box Score, November 28, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  28. ^ "Dalvin Cook 2015 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  29. ^ "Ole Miss vs Florida State Box Score, September 5, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  30. ^ "Florida State at South Florida Box Score, September 24, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  31. ^ "North Carolina at Florida State Box Score, October 1, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  32. ^ "Dalvin Cook passes Warrick Dunn as Florida State's all-time leading rusher".
  33. ^ "Florida State at Syracuse Box Score, November 19, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  34. ^ "Florida State Seminoles Rushing". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  35. ^ "Orange Bowl – Michigan vs Florida State Box Score, December 30, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  36. ^ Goodbread, Chase. "Florida State's Dalvin Cook intends to enter 2017 NFL Draft". NFL.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  37. ^ "2017 NFL Draft rankings: Top Prospects by position". si.com. Retrieved May 11, 2017.
  38. ^ a b "*Dalvin Cook – Florida State, RB : 2017 NFL Draft Scout Player Profile". www.nfldraftscout.com. Archived from the original on April 12, 2017. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  39. ^ Mike Mayock (April 12, 2017). "Mike Mayock's 2017 NFL Draft position rankings 3.0". NFL.com. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  40. ^ Bucky Brooks (April 25, 2017). "Bucky Brooks' 2017 NFL Draft position rankings 3.0". NFL.com. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  41. ^ "NFL Draft Profile: Dalvin Cook". NFL.com. Retrieved May 11, 2017.
  42. ^ Patra, Kevin. "Minnesota Vikings trade up to land Dalvin Cook". NFL.com. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  43. ^ "Draft Finder Query Results". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 10, 2018.
  44. ^ Brinson, Will. "Dalvin Cook breaks an Adrian Peterson franchise record in front of the ex-Viking". www.cbssports.com. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  45. ^ "Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Minnesota Vikings – September 24th, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved November 5, 2017.
  46. ^ Sessler, Marc (October 2, 2017). "Dalvin Cook out for the season with torn ACL". NFL.com. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  47. ^ "Vikings Sign Stevan Ridley, Place Dalvin Cook on IR". Vikings.com. October 5, 2017.
  48. ^ "Dalvin Cook 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  49. ^ Tomasson, Chris (October 10, 2017). "Vikings RB Dalvin Cook undergoes successful ACL surgery". Twin Cities. Retrieved October 12, 2017.
  50. ^ "Vikings dispatch 49ers in Cousins' team debut". Reuters. September 9, 2018. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  51. ^ "Mike Williams, Dalvin Cook among NFL Players of the Week". NFL.com. December 19, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  52. ^ "Dalvin Cook 2018 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  53. ^ "Vikings trample Falcons 28-12 behind fierce defense, Cook". www.espn.com. Associated Press. September 8, 2019. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  54. ^ "Packers ride Rodgers' hot start to 21-16 win over Vikings". www.espn.com. Associated Press. September 15, 2019. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  55. ^ "NFL rushing leader Cook leads Vikes romp past Raiders 34-14". www.espn.com. Associated Press. September 22, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  56. ^ "Cousins, Thielen lead Vikings in dominant win over Giants". www.espn.com. October 6, 2019. Retrieved October 6, 2019.
  57. ^ "Cousins has 4 TD passes as Vikings surge past Lions 42-30". www.espn.com. October 20, 2019. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  58. ^ "Cook, Vikings wear down Redskins 19-9 for 4th straight win". www.espn.com. October 24, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  59. ^ "Cook leads Vikings to 28-24 prime-time road win over Cowboys". www.espn.com. November 10, 2019. Retrieved November 10, 2019.
  60. ^ Bergman, Jeremy (November 13, 2019). "Jamal Adams, Jadeveon Clowney among Players of the Week". www.nfl.com. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  61. ^ Schlabach, Mark. "FSU's Cook named 'associate' in police report". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  62. ^ Klemko, Robert. "Dalvin Cook and the Stories Behind the Red Flags".

External links[edit]