Damage (Marvel Comics)

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Damage
DamagePunisher.jpg
Damage in Wolverine and The Punisher: Damaging Evidence Vol. 1, #3 (November 1993)
Art by Gary Erskine
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceThe Punisher War Journal Vol. 1, #8 (September 1989)
Created byJim Lee
Carl Potts
In-story information
Alter egoJaime Ortiz
SpeciesHuman Cyborg
Place of originEarth
Team affiliationsBunsen Burners
Notable aliasesPunisher
AbilitiesCyborg enhancements

Damage (Jaime Ortiz) is a fictional character, a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He is an enemy of the Punisher and Wolverine.

Publication history[edit]

Created by Carl Potts and Jim Lee, the character made his first appearance in The Punisher War Journal Vol. 1, #8 (September 1989),

Damage's first appearance was as a gang leader in The Punisher War Journal Vol. 1, #8. After nearly dying in that issue, the character was rebuilt into a cyborg in a story arc that lasted from The Punisher War Journal Vol. 1, #17-20 to Wolverine and The Punisher: Damaging Evidence Vol. 1, #1-3.

Damage received a profile in Marvel Encyclopedia #5, which revealed his real name is Jaime Ortiz.

Fictional character biography[edit]

The head of a Manhattan street gang known as the Bunsen Burners, Damage became aware that the Punisher was after him, so he decided to make a preemptive strike against the vigilante by hijacking or destroying his Battle Van. While his underlings were killed by the Battle Van's automated defenses, Damage made it into the vehicle, where he was ensnared and crippled by its mechanical tentacles and coils. The trapped Damage was later found by the Punisher, who dropped him off at a hospital, having concluded that letting Damage live out the rest of his life in the mangled state he was in was punishment enough for him.[1]

The Arranger, having been given the assignment of finding and recruiting new assassins for the Kingpin, discovered Damage through a newspaper article, and arranged for him to be moved to a private clinic, where surgeons set about reconstructing him into a cyborg. When Damage began to die on the operating table, the Arranger inspired him to continue fighting for survival by reminding him of his hatred for the Punisher.[2][3][4][5]

When Damage's transformation was completed, he was further augmented by technology supplied by Donald Pierce, and made to resemble the Punisher, in order to frame him for a series of murders. The killings drew the attention of Wolverine, who tracked Damage down to a chemical plant, where the two fought. Damage had the upper hand until the Punisher, who was preoccupied with the Sniper, appeared, and destroyed Damage by setting him ablaze, and knocking him into a vat, which exploded. The Kingpin had Damage's remains recovered, and sent them to Pierce, along with fifty million dollars to pay for his reconstruction.[6][7][8]

Powers and abilities[edit]

As a cyborg, Damage possessed superhuman strength and durability, as well as numerous retractable weapons such as a grenade launcher, a flamethrower, and a minigun. He also had infrared vision, and could electrocute others by touching them.

In other media[edit]

Video games[edit]

  • Damage appears the 2005 Punisher video game, voiced by Steven Blum. He appears as the leader of an unnamed gang, and the owner of a crack house. After fighting his way through Damage's men, the Punisher interrogates him, then kills him by throwing him off of a multi-story ledge.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Carl Potts (w), Jim Lee (p), Jim Lee (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Damage" The Punisher War Journal #8 (September 1989), United States: Marvel Comics
  2. ^ Carl Potts (w), Jim Lee (p), Don Hudson and Al Milgrom (i), Gregory Wright (col), Rich Parker (let), Don Daley (ed). "Tropical Trouble" The Punisher War Journal #17 (April 1990), United States: Marvel Comics
  3. ^ Carl Potts (w), Jim Lee (p), Don Hudson and Al Milgrom (i), Gregory Wright (col), Rich Parker (let), Don Daley (ed). "Kahuna" The Punisher War Journal #18 (May 1990), United States: Marvel Comics
  4. ^ Carl Potts (w), Jim Lee (p), Don Hudson and Al Milgrom (i), Gregory Wright (col), Rich Parker (let), Don Daley (ed). "Trauma in Paradise" The Punisher War Journal #19 (June 1990), United States: Marvel Comics
  5. ^ Carl Potts (w), Tod Smith (p), Al Milgrom (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Debt" The Punisher War Journal #20 (July 1990), United States: Marvel Comics
  6. ^ Carl Potts (w), Gary Erskine (p), Gary Erskine (i), Marie Javins (col), John Gaushell and Richard Starkings (let), Rob Tokar and Greg Wright (ed). "Part One" Wolverine and The Punisher: Damaging Evidence #1 (October 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  7. ^ Carl Potts (w), Gary Erskine (p), Gary Erskine (i), Marie Javins (col), John Gaushell and Richard Starkings (let), Rob Tokar and Greg Wrightstory (ed). "Part Two" Wolverine and The Punisher: Damaging Evidence #2 (November 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  8. ^ Carl Potts (w), Gary Erskine (p), Gary Erskine (i), Garrahy, Javins, and Matthys (col), John Gaushell and Richard Starkings (let), Rob Tokar and Greg Wright (ed). "Part Three" Wolverine and The Punisher: Damaging Evidence #3 (December 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  9. ^ Volition (16 January 2005). The Punisher. PlayStation 2, Xbox, and Microsoft Windows. THQ. Level/area: 1. Maurice: Damage runs it! He's up on the fourth floor!

External links[edit]

  • Damage at Marvel Wiki
  • Damage at Comic Vine
  • Damage at the Comic Book DB
  • Damage at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe