Do you know where your children are?

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For the Michael Jackson song, see Xscape (album).
Do you know where your children are? - Public Service Announcement

"Do you know where your children are?" was a question used as a public service announcement (PSA) for parents on American television during the late 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The term was coined in 1967 by Mel Epstein, the Director of On-Air Promotions at New York's WNEW-TV.[1][2]

The question "Do you know where your children are?" was typically asked around 10:00 PM or 11:00 PM, depending on the market and the time of the local youth curfew, usually immediately preceding the station's late-evening newscast.[3][4]

The PSA was featured on Time magazine's "Top 10 Public-Service Announcements" list.[5]

In popular culture[edit]

The PSA was often parodied.

Following a White Zombie's performance at the 1995 MTV Video Music Awards, Dennis Miller quipped, "It's 11:00; do you know where your zombies are?".

It was featured in an episode of The Simpsons, with Homer Simpson responding to the television, "I told you last night — no!"[6]

Bill Watterson featured a reference to the announcement in the first book of comic strips for Calvin and Hobbes.

The line was also parodied in the 1990 film, Class of 1999 when Ms. Connors (Pam Grier)) sarcastically says to Christy (Traci Lind), "It's 10 p.m. Do you know where your boyfriend is?".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 10 Public-Service Announcements - What Time Is It?". Time. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  2. ^ Kovalchik, Kara. "The Origin of "It's 10 PM. Do You Know Where Your Children Are?"". Mental Floss. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  3. ^ "Top 10 Public-Service Announcements - What Time Is It?". Time. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  4. ^ Kovalchik, Kara. "The Origin of "It's 10 PM. Do You Know Where Your Children Are?"". Mental Floss. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  5. ^ "Top 10 Public-Service Announcements". Time. Retrieved 4 April 2016. 
  6. ^ "Top 10 Public-Service Announcements - What Time Is It?". Time. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 

External links[edit]