Ethan Iverson

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Ethan Iverson
Ethan iverson.jpg
Iverson in 2009
Background information
Born (1973-02-11) February 11, 1973 (age 46)
Menomonie, Wisconsin, U.S.
GenresJazz, avant-garde jazz
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsPiano
LabelsFresh Sound, Sunnyside, HighNote, Criss Cross
Associated actsThe Bad Plus
Websitewww.ethaniverson.com

Ethan Iverson (born February 11, 1973) is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin.[1] Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert "Tootie" Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.[2]

He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.[3]

In 2017, the Bad Plus announced that Iverson would be leaving the Bad Plus and that Orrin Evans would replace him.[4]

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

Year recorded Title Label Notes
1993? School Work Mons Some tracks trio, with Johannes Weidermueller (bass), Falk Willis (drums); some tracks quartet, with Dewey Redman (tenor sax) added[5]
1998 Construction Zone (Originals) Fresh Sound New Talent Trio, with Reid Anderson (bass), Jorge Rossy (drums)[6]
1998 Deconstruction Zone (Standards) Fresh Sound New Talent Trio, with Reid Anderson (bass), Jorge Rossy (drums)[6]
1999 The Minor Passions Fresh Sound New Talent Trio, with Reid Anderson (bass), Billy Hart (drums)[6]
2000 Live at Smalls Fresh Sound New Talent Quartet, with Bill McHenry (tenor sax), Reid Anderson (bass), Jeff Williams (drums); in concert[6][7]
2013? Costumes Are Mandatory HighNote Most tracks quartet, with Lee Konitz (alto sax), Larry Grenadier (bass), Jorge Rossy (drums); some tracks trio, duo, solo[8]
2016 The Purity of the Turf Criss Cross Most tracks trio, with Ron Carter (bass), Nasheet Waits (drums); one track solo piano[9][10]
2017 Temporary Kings ECM Duo, with Mark Turner (tenor sax)[11][12]

With The Bad Plus

As sideman[edit]

With Albert Heath

  • Live at Small's (2010)
  • Tootie's Tempo (2013)

With Billy Hart

With Buffalo Collision (incl. Tim Berne, Hank Roberts, David King)

  • Duck (2008)

With Avantango (Thomas Chapin and Pablo Aslan)

  • Y En El 2000 Tambien... (EPSA Music, Argentina)

With Patrick Zimmerli

  • Twelve Sacred Dances (1998)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bad Plus". Current Biography Yearbook 2011. Ipswich, MA: H.W. Wilson. 2011. pp. 30–33. ISBN 9780824211219.
  2. ^ Adler, David R. "Ethan Iverson | Biography & History | AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved 21 November 2016.
  3. ^ "Pianist Ethan Iverson joined New England Conservatory's jazz studio faculty in 2016". New England Conservatory. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  4. ^ "The Bad Plus to Part Ways with Founding Pianist Ethan Iverson". 10 April 2017.
  5. ^ Yanow, Scott. "Ethan Iverson: School Work". AllMusic. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings (9th ed.). Penguin. p. 751. ISBN 978-0-141-03401-0.
  7. ^ Adler, David R. "Reid Anderson / Ethan Iverson / Bill McHenry / Jeff Williams: Live at Small's". AllMusic. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  8. ^ Jurek, Thom. "Larry Grenadier / Ethan Iverson / Lee Konitz / Jorge Rossy: Costumes Are Mandatory". AllMusic. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  9. ^ Fordham, John (December 1, 2016). "Ethan Iverson: The Purity of the Turf Review – Like a Time-Travelling Monk Trio". The Guardian.
  10. ^ "Criss Cross Jazz 1391 CD". crisscrossjazz.com. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  11. ^ Grillo, Tyran (September 1, 2018). "Mark Turner / Ethan Iverson: Temporary Kings (ECM 2583)". ecmreviews.com. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  12. ^ Richards, Chris (September 5, 2018). "Mark Turner and Ethan Iverson's Jazz? It Sounds Like Stravinsky and the Blues". The Washington Post.

External links[edit]