Evie Wyld

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Evie Wyld
Born (1980-06-16) 16 June 1980 (age 40)
London, England
Alma materBath Spa University
Goldsmiths, University of London
Notable awardsJohn Llewellyn Rhys Prize (2009)
Encore Award (2013)
Miles Franklin Award (2014)
Spouse
Jamie Coleman
(m. 2013)
Website
www.eviewyld.com

Evelyn Rose Strange "Evie" Wyld FRSL (born 16 June 1980) is an Anglo-Australian author. Her first novel, After the Fire, A Still Small Voice, won the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize in 2009, and her second novel, All the Birds, Singing, won the Encore Award in 2013 and the Miles Franklin Award in 2014. Her third novel, The Bass Rock, was published September 1, 2020.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Born in London in 1980,[2] Evie Wyld grew up on her grandparents' sugar cane farm in New South Wales, Australia, although she spent most of her adult life in Peckham, south London. In The Guardian she recounts how as a child she suffered from viral encephalitis.[3]

She obtained a BA from Bath Spa University and an MA from Goldsmiths, University of London, both in Creative Writing.

Literary career[edit]

Wyld is the author of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and Betty Trask Award-winning novel After the Fire, A Still Small Voice[4] and All the Birds, Singing. In 2010 she was listed by The Daily Telegraph as one of the 20 best British authors under the age of 40.[5] In 2011 she was listed by the BBC's Culture Show as one of the 12 Best New British Writers.[6] In 2013 she was included on the once a decade Granta Best of Young British Novelists List.[7] Her novels have been shortlisted for the Costa Novel Prize,[8] The Miles Franklin Award,[9] the Commonwealth Writers Prize,[10] the Orange Award for New Writers,[11] the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award,[12] The Sky Arts Breakthrough Award,[13] the James Tait Black Prize[14] and The Author's Club Prize,[15] and longlisted for the Stella Prize[16] and the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction.[17]

She took over from Nii Parkes as Booktrust's online "Writer in Residence" in 2010,[18] before passing the baton on to Polly Dunbar.[19]

Her second novel, All the Birds, Singing, was published in February 2013 and concerns an Australian sheep farmer working on an English hill farm.[20] The book won the 2014 Miles Franklin Award in June 2014.[21]

Her third novel, The Bass Rock, was published by Penguin Random House on September 1, 2020. Set in Scotland, it explores the lives of three women living in different centuries and the ways their lives are impacted by masculinity and male violence. Writing for The New York Times, reviewer John Williams called the book "wondrous and disturbing" and described Wyld's prose as "observant, melodic, imaginative."[22] The Bass Rock was listed among 2020's best books by Vogue, with Taylor Antrim saying that it is "as intricately built as relentlessly ominous [...] Wyld is so controlled and subtle a storyteller that her themes remain elegantly beneath the surface."[23]

Personal life[edit]

Wyld currently lives in Brixton and works at an independent bookshop in Peckham.[24][25] She married literary agent Jamie Coleman in July 2013.[26]

Awards and honours[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Short stories[edit]

  • "What will happen to the dog after we are dead?" (published in Goldfish: An Anthology of Writing from Goldsmiths)[30]
  • "The Convalescent's Handbook" (online) first published in Sea Stories, an anthology from the National Maritime Museum[30]
  • "The Building Opposite" (appeared in 3:AM Magazine anthology London, New York, Paris)[30]
  • "The Whales" (online) from Booktrust
  • "Menzies Meat" (online)
  • "Free Swim" (online)
  • "Six Degrees of Separation" (online)

Novels[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Bass Rock". Penguin Random House. Retrieved 15 September 2020.
  2. ^ 3:AM Top 5: Evie Wyld » 3:AM Magazine
  3. ^ Once upon a life: Evie Wyld
  4. ^ Previous winners of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize
  5. ^ Bradbury, Lorna (18 June 2010), "Are these Britain’s best 20 novelists under 40?", The Telegraph.
  6. ^ The Culture Show, BBC Two.
  7. ^ a b http://www.granta.com/Archive/123
  8. ^ a b Brown, Mark (26 November 2013). "Costa book awards 2013: late author on all-female fiction shortlist". The Guardian. Retrieved 27 November 2013.
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 May 2014. Retrieved 20 May 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ Allen, Katie (13 April 2010), "Wyld picked for Orange New Writers prize", The Bookseller.
  12. ^ [2]
  13. ^ [3]
  14. ^ "Shortlists for book awards are revealed", The Herald, 19 May 2014.
  15. ^ Allen, Katie (15 February 2010), "Wyld up for Authors' Club prize", The Bookseller.
  16. ^ "The Longlist 2014 Stella Prize", Stella.
  17. ^ Wood, Gaby (7 March 2014), "Baileys Women's Prize 2014: A thriving longlist announced", The Telegraph.
  18. ^ Booktrust announces new online Writer in Residence
  19. ^ "Evie Wyld", Previous Writers in Residence, BookTrust.
  20. ^ Williams, Charlotte (6 October 2011), Jonathan Cape buys second Wyld novel", The Bookseller.
  21. ^ Raschella, Adrian (26 June 2014). "Miles Franklin Literary Award: Author Evie Wyld wins for her book All The Birds Singing". ABC News. Retrieved 26 June 2014.
  22. ^ Williams, John (9 September 2020). "Women on the Scottish Coast, at the Whims of Male Violence". The New York Times. Retrieved 15 September 2020.
  23. ^ Schama, Chloe (24 December 2020). "The Best Books of 2020 According to Vogue Editors". Vogue. Retrieved 3 January 2021.
  24. ^ "8 Questions for Evie Wyld". Archived from the original on 16 November 2012. Retrieved 10 November 2012.
  25. ^ Award-winning author Evie Wyld was Booktrust's third online writer in residence
  26. ^ Steffens, Daneet (17 June 2013). "Evie Wyld, take two". The Bookseller. Retrieved 15 July 2014.
  27. ^ "2013 Winner". Encore Award. 19 June 2014. Archived from the original on 22 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  28. ^ European Commission. "Winners of 2014 European Union Prize for Literature announced at Frankfurt Book Fair - Press Release". Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  29. ^ Flood, Alison (28 June 2018). "Royal Society of Literature admits 40 new fellows to address historical biases". the Guardian. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
  30. ^ a b c Mulcahy Conway Associates Ltd
  31. ^ The Betty Trask Prize and Awards

External links[edit]