Red Berenson

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Red Berenson
Red Berenson Chex card.jpg
Born (1939-12-08) December 8, 1939 (age 77)
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 195 lb (88 kg; 13 st 13 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for SJHL
 Omaha Knights
NCAA
 Michigan Wolverines
NHL
 Montreal Canadiens
 New York Rangers
 St. Louis Blues
 Detroit Red Wings
AHL
 Quebec Aces
National team  Canada
Playing career 1961–1978
Red Berenson
Redmichigan.jpeg
Berenson coaching the Michigan Wolverines
Sport(s) Ice hockey
Biographical details
Alma mater University of Michigan
Playing career
1959–1962 Michigan
Position(s) Left Wing
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1978–1979 St. Louis Blues (assistant)
1979–1982 St. Louis Blues
1982–1984 Buffalo Sabres
1984–2017 Michigan
Head coaching record
Overall 848–429–92 (.653) [College]
Tournaments 30–23 (.566)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1981 Smythe Division Champion
1992 CCHA Regular Season Champion
1994 CCHA Regular Season Champion
1994 CCHA Tournament Champion
1995 CCHA Regular Season Champion
1996 CCHA Regular Season Champion
1996 CCHA Tournament Champion
1996 NCAA National Champion
1997 CCHA Regular Season Champion
1997 CCHA Tournament Champion
1998 NCAA National Champion
1999 CCHA Tournament Champion
2000 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2002 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2002 CCHA Tournament Champion
2003 CCHA Tournament Champion
2004 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2005 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2005 CCHA Tournament Champion
2008 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2008 CCHA Tournament Champion
2010 CCHA Tournament Champion
2011 CCHA Regular Season Champion
2016 Big Ten Tournament Champion
Awards
1981 Jack Adams Award
1994 CCHA Coach of the Year
2008 CCHA Coach of the Year
2008 Spencer Penrose Award
2016 Big Ten Coach of the Year

Gordon Arthur "Red, The Red Baron" Berenson (born December 8, 1939) is a former Canadian professional ice hockey centre and long-time head coach of the Michigan Wolverines men's ice hockey team from 1984–2017.

Playing career[edit]

Berenson played junior ice hockey with the Regina Pats, participating in two Memorial Cups in 1956 and 1958. In 1959, Berenson played for the World Champion Belleville McFarlands.

Berenson (No. 9) cuts behind the net against Colorado College 1961

Berenson moved on to, and graduated from, Michigan's School of Business and played collegiately at the University of Michigan, winning All-American honors there with an NCAA-leading 43 goals in his final year.

He signed thereafter with the Montreal Canadiens, playing five years in their system and being on a Stanley Cup-winning squad in 1965 before being traded to the New York Rangers, where he played parts of two seasons without success.

Seven weeks into the 1967/1968 NHL season the St. Louis Blues acquired Red Berenson along with Barclay Plager from the New York Rangers. It was with the Blues where he became one of the new Western Division's first great stars, leading the Blues to three straight Stanley Cup finals and being named the division's best player by his peers in The Sporting News' annual poll each of those years.

His most notable scoring feat came on November 7, 1968, in a road game against the Philadelphia Flyers. Berenson scored six goals, including four over a nine-minute span. He became the first player to score a double hat trick on a road game.[1] The six-goal total was one shy of the all-time NHL record (set by Joe Malone in 1920), and has been accomplished only once since.

Berenson was named team captain in 1970; however, as he was already 31 years old, the Blues felt his skills could only decline, and traded him in what was considered a shocking deal to the Detroit Red Wings, a multi-player trade receiving centre Garry Unger in return. He was an impact player for Detroit for four seasons, but was having a poor fifth season when he was dealt back to the Blues. The trade rejuvenated him, and he was an effective player for three and a half more seasons before he retired after the 1977–1978 campaign.

Berenson played in the legendary eight-game Summit Series for Team Canada against the Soviet Union in 1972, as well as in the “old-timers” rematch of the Canada Cup in 1987. He played in six NHL All-Star Games.

Altogether, in 17 NHL seasons, Berenson recorded 261 goals and 397 assists in 987 games.

Coaching career[edit]

Berenson retired from playing in 1978 and joined the Blues' coaching staff. He became the team's Head Coach midway through the 1979–80 season. A year later, he won the Jack Adams Award as the NHL's Coach of the Year. He returned to his Alma Mater as Head Coach in 1984 and has remained in the position ever since. Berenson has led the Wolverines to 11 Frozen Four appearances, and NCAA championships in 1996 and 1998. In CCHA competition, his teams have won 11 regular-season and 9 tournament titles. In addition, Berenson's squads qualified for the NCAA Tournament for 22 consecutive seasons from 1991 to 2012.[2] This is the longest streak ever in college hockey history. The Wolverines have also won 13 Great Lakes Invitational titles under Berenson.

On January 10, 2015, Berenson became the fourth coach in Division I men's hockey history reach 800 career wins.[3]

Berenson was named the 2015–16 Big Ten Coach of the Year after leading the Wolverines to a 22–7–5 regular-season record, including a 12–5–3–2 record in Big Ten play.[4]

On April 10, 2017, Berenson announced his retirement as head coach of the Michigan Wolverine men's ice hockey team following 33 years. He finished his career with an 848–426–92 record in 1,366 games, and helped lead Michigan to a record 36 NCAA tournament appearances.[5]

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
All-WCHA First Team 1960–61
AHCA West All-American 1960–61
All-WCHA First Team 1961–62
AHCA West All-American 1961–62
All-NCAA All-Tournament First Team 1962 [6]
Big Ten Coach of the Year 2015–16 [4]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1955–56 Regina Pats SJHL
1955–56 Regina Pats M-Cup 5 0 0 0 0
1956–57 Regina Pats SJHL 51 21 23 44 86 7 3 4 7 4
1957–58 Regina Pats SJHL 51 46 49 95 62 27 11 20 31 49
1957–58 Regina Pats M-Cup 5 0 0 0 0
1958–59 Belleville McFarlands EOHL 1 2 1 3 2
1958–59 Flin Flon Bombers WCJHL 10 10 9 19 10
1958–59 Flin Flon Bombers M-Cup 6 3 3 6 2
1959–60 University of Michigan WCHA 28 12 7 19 12
1960–61 University of Michigan WCHA 28 24 25 49
1961–62 University of Michigan WCHA 28 43 27 70 40
1961–62 Montreal Canadiens NHL 4 1 2 3 4 5 2 0 2 4
1962–63 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EPHL 30 23 25 48 28
1962–63 Montreal Canadiens NHL 37 2 6 8 15 5 0 0 0 0
1963–64 Montreal Canadiens NHL 69 7 9 16 12 7 0 0 0 4
1964–65 Quebec Aces AHL 65 22 34 56 16 5 1 2 3 8
1964–65 Montreal Canadiens NHL 3 1 2 3 0 9 0 1 1 2
1965–66 Quebec Aces AHL 34 17 36 53 14 6 1 5 6 2
1965–66 Montreal Canadiens NHL 23 3 4 7 12
1966–67 New York Rangers NHL 30 0 5 5 2 4 0 1 1 2
1967–68 New York Rangers NHL 19 2 1 3 2
1967–68 St. Louis Blues NHL 55 22 29 51 22 18 5 2 7 9
1968–69 St. Louis Blues NHL 76 35 47 82 43 12 7 3 10 20
1969–70 St. Louis Blues NHL 67 33 39 72 38 16 7 5 12 8
1970–71 St. Louis Blues NHL 45 16 26 42 12
1970–71 Detroit Red Wings NHL 24 5 12 17 4
1971–72 Detroit Red Wings NHL 78 28 41 69 16
1972–73 Detroit Red Wings NHL 78 13 30 43 8
1973–74 Detroit Red Wings NHL 76 24 42 66 28
1974–75 Detroit Red Wings NHL 27 3 3 6 8
1974–75 St. Louis Blues NHL 44 12 19 31 12 2 1 0 1 -
1975–76 St. Louis Blues NHL 72 20 27 47 47 3 1 2 3 0
1976–77 St. Louis Blues NHL 80 21 28 49 8 4 0 0 0 4
1977–78 St. Louis Blues NHL 80 13 25 38 12
NHL totals 987 261 397 658 305 85 23 14 37 49

International[edit]

Year Team Event   GP G A Pts PIM
1959 Canada WC 8 9 4 13
1972 Canada SS 2 0 1 1 0
Senior totals 10 9 5 14

NHL coaching record[edit]

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L T Pts Division rank Result
St. Louis Blues 1979–80 56 27 20 9 (63) 2nd in Smythe Lost in Preliminary Round
St. Louis Blues 1980–81 80 45 18 17 107 1st in Smythe Lost in Quarter-Finals
St. Louis Blues 1981–82 68 28 34 6 (62) 3rd in Norris (fired)
Total 204 100 72 32

College Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Michigan Wolverines (CCHA) (1984–2013)
1984–85 Michigan 13–26–1 11–20–1 t-7th CCHA First Round
1985–86 Michigan 12–26–0 10–22–0 8th CCHA First Round
1986–87 Michigan 14–25–1 11–20–1 7th CCHA First Round
1987–88 Michigan 22–19–0 17–15–0 5th CCHA First Round
1988–89 Michigan 22–15–4 17–11–4 4th CCHA First Round
1989–90 Michigan 24–12–6 16–11–5 4th CCHA Consolation Game (Win)
1990–91 Michigan 34–10–3 24–5–3 2nd NCAA Quarterfinals
1991–92 Michigan 32–9–3 22–7–3 1st NCAA Frozen Four
1992–93 Michigan 30–7–3 23–5–2 2nd NCAA Frozen Four
1993–94 Michigan 33–7–1 24–5–1 1st NCAA West Regional Semifinals
1994–95 Michigan 30–8–1 22–4–1 1st NCAA Frozen Four
1995–96 Michigan 33–7–2 22–6–2 t-1st NCAA National Champion
1996–97 Michigan 35–4–4 21–3–3 1st NCAA Frozen Four
1997–98 Michigan 33–11–1 22–7–1 2nd NCAA National Champion
1998–99 Michigan 25–11–6 17–8–5 2nd NCAA East Regional Semifinals
1999–00 Michigan 27–10–4 19–6–3 1st NCAA East Regional Semifinals
2000–01 Michigan 27–13–5 16–9–3 t-2nd NCAA Frozen Four
2001–02 Michigan 28–11–5 19–5–4 6th NCAA Frozen Four
2002–03 Michigan 30–10–3 18–7–3 2nd NCAA Frozen Four
2003–04 Michigan 27–14–2 18–8–2 1st NCAA Northeast Regional Finals
2004–05 Michigan 31–8–3 21–3–2 1st NCAA Midwest Regional Finals
2005–06 Michigan 21–15–5 13–10–5 3rd NCAA West Regional Semifinals
2006–07 Michigan 26–14–1 18–9–1 2nd NCAA West Regional Semifinals
2007–08 Michigan 33–6–4 24–4–4 1st NCAA Frozen Four
2008–09 Michigan 29–12–0 20–8–0–0 2nd NCAA East Regional Semifinals
2009–10 Michigan 26–18–1 14–13–1–0 t-7th NCAA Midwest Regional Finals
2010–11 Michigan 29–11–4 20–7–1–0 1st NCAA Runner-Up
2011–12 Michigan 24–13–4 15–9–4–1 t-2nd NCAA Midwest Regional Semifinals
2012–13 Michigan 18–19–3 10–15–3–3 7th CCHA Runner-Up
Michigan: 770–371–80 524–262–68
Michigan Wolverines (Big Ten) (2013–2017)
2013–14 Michigan 18–13–4 10–8–2–1 3rd Big Ten Quarterfinals
2014–15 Michigan 22–15–0 12–8–0 3rd Big Ten Runner-Up
2015–16 Michigan 25–8–5 12–5–3–2 2nd NCAA Midwest Regional Finals
2016–17 Michigan 13–19–3 6–12–2–2 5th Big Ten Quarterfinals
Michigan: 78–55–12 40–33–6
Total: 848–429–92

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hockey’s Book of Firsts, p.27, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  2. ^ Cunningham, Pete. "Michigan hockey's 22-year NCAA Tournament streak snapped with CCHA final loss to Notre Dame". Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "Red Berenson's Road to 800 Career Wins". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. January 10, 2015. Retrieved January 10, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Connor, Berenson Head List of All-Big Ten Award Winners". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. March 14, 2016. Retrieved March 14, 2016. 
  5. ^ Sipple, George (April 10, 2017). "Legendary Michigan hockey coach Red Berenson retires". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  6. ^ "NCAA Frozen Four Records" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved 2013-06-19. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Jerry Walker
WCHA Player of the Year
1961–62
Succeeded by
Louis Nanne
Preceded by
Pat Quinn
Winner of the Jack Adams Award
1981
Succeeded by
Tom Watt
Preceded by
George Gwozdecky
Jeff Jackson
CCHA Coach of the Year
1993–94
2007–08
Succeeded by
Buddy Powers
Dallas Ferguson
Preceded by
Jeff Jackson
Spencer Penrose Award
2007–08
Succeeded by
Jack Parker
Preceded by
Guy Gadowsky
Big Ten Coach of the Year
2015–16
Succeeded by
Tony Granato
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Al Arbour
Barclay Plager
Garry Unger
St. Louis Blues captain
1970–71
1976
1977–78
Succeeded by
Al Arbour
Garry Unger
Barry Gibbs
Preceded by
Nick Libett
Detroit Red Wings captain
1973
Succeeded by
Gary Bergman
Preceded by
Barclay Plager
Head coach of the St. Louis Blues
197982
Succeeded by
Emile Francis