HHLA

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Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG
Aktiengesellschaft
Traded asFWBHHFA
IndustryLogistics, transportation
Founded7 March 1885[1]
HeadquartersHamburg, Germany
Key people
ServicesContainer terminals, cargo handling and transport
Revenue 1,382.6 million (2019)[4]
€ 221.2 million (2019)[4]
€ 137.1 million (2019)[4]
Total assets€ 2,610.0 million (2019)[4]
Total equity€ 578,862 thousand (2019)[4]
Number of employees
6,296 (2019)[4]
Websitewww.hhla.de

Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (abbreviated HHLA), known until 2005 as Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-Aktiengesellschaft, and prior to that as Hamburger Freihafen-Lagerhaus Gesellschaft (HFLG) since 1885,[5] is a German logistics and transportation company specialising in port throughput and container and transport logistics.

Overview[edit]

HHLA’s core business is divided into four segments:[6]

As of 31 December 2019, the company employed 6,296 people worldwide, and generated revenue of € 1.38 billion.[4]

Shares in the Port Logistics subgroup (“Class A shares”) have been listed since November 2007.[7] Class A shares in HHLA were included in the MDAX from 2008 to 2013[8] before becoming part of the SDAX in June 2013.[9] The Real Estate subgroup covers the company’s properties that are not specific to port handling, with its shares listed as “Class S”. These cannot be freely traded and are entirely owned by the City of Hamburg.[10] HHLA’s administrative headquarters is known as the Speicherstadtrathaus.[11]

Business segments[edit]

Container[edit]

HHLA operates three of the four container terminals in the Port of Hamburg:[12]

Approximately 7.6 million TEU were handled here in 2019 (2018: 7.3 million TEU).[4]

HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder CTA is almost completely automated.[16] The shipping company Hapag-Lloyd owns a share of 25.1% in the terminal.[17] Container Terminal Burchardkai is the largest[18] and oldest surviving[19] container handling facility at the Port of Hamburg.

HHLA also owns a container terminal at the Port of Odessa.[20] In June 2018, HHLA acquired the largest Estonian terminal operator Transiidikeskuse AS (headquartered in Muuga). At the time, the container terminal had a handling capacity of approximately 300,000 TEU.[21] HHLA’s Container segment also includes a number of services related to container handling offered by its subsidiaries.

Intermodal[edit]

This segment covers container transport by rail and road.[22] The sector includes the transport company Metrans and road transport company Container-Transport-Dienst (CTD). Metrans operates container trains from its own terminals in the Czech Republic, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland and neighbouring countries;[23] CTD covers the area surrounding the Hamburg Metropolitan Region by road.[24] In 2012, HHLA sold its 50% share in TFG Transfracht to Deutsche Bahn,[25] and in 2018, Polzug Intermodal merged with Metrans.[26] In 2019, the intermodal companies transported a total of 1.6 million standard containers by rail and road.[4]

Logistics[edit]

This segment incorporates warehouse logistics and special handling, consulting, and various Start-ups.[27] It includes a number of equity holdings and subsidiaries, including the consulting firm HPC Hamburg Port Consulting. The fruit terminal at O’Swaldkai is also part of this segment.[28] At the same port is a RoRo terminal handling rolling cargo (RoRo).[29] Together with Salzgitter AG, HHLA also operates the Hansaport, Germany’s largest terminal for bulk cargo.[30]

Real estate[edit]

HHLA develops, designs and operates commercial properties. These include the Speicherstadt historical warehouse district, the area surrounding the Fischmarkt Hamburg-Altona as well as other logistics facilities and office buildings in and around the Port of Hamburg.[31]

Other[edit]

The company supports and oversees the development of start-ups and holds investments in technology companies in the areas of drone technology[32] and 3D printing.[33] It co-founded the joint venture Hyperport Cargo Solutions to develop a component to bring Hyperloop technology to ports.[34]

In July, 2020,Hamburg Port Consulting announced that it will implement a machine learning solution for predicted dwell time at the Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHL)’s Container Terminal Burchardkai (CTB).[35]

History[edit]

1885–1945[edit]

Administrative building in the Speicherstadt

Hamburg’s state quay administration was founded in 1866.[36] Its role included organising transloading for the city and the maintenance of both the wharfs and the equipment and machinery on them. In March 1885, the city founded the Hamburger Freihafen-Lagerhaus-Gesellschaft (HFLG).[1] As part of Hamburg’s inclusion in the German Imperial customs system, the company’s role was to build and maintain the world’s most modern and largest logistics centre at that time – Hamburg’s Speicherstadt historical warehouse district.[37] It was an Aktiengesellschaft from the very beginning, with the city contributing the property and Norddeutsche Bank the capital. Construction of the Speicherstadt warehouse district began in 1885 and was largely completed by 1912.[38] By 1913, the Port of Hamburg was the third-largest in the world behind the ports of London and New York.[39]

During World War I (1914–1918), the Royal Navy blocked the seaports of the German Reich.[40] This brought business in Hamburg and its port to a complete standstill.[41] In the Treaty of Versailles, the allied powers forced Germany to give up the majority of its merchant navy.[42] Companies such as HAPAG were, however, able to retool in the coming years.[43] In 1927, the City of Hamburg became the sole shareholder in HFLG.[44]

The effects of the Great Depression (from 1929), protectionism in many industrial countries, the seizure of control by the National Socialists (1933) and their autarky policy saw cross border trade drop to levels lower than before the crisis.[45] In 1935, HFLG merged with the state quay administration to become the Betriebsgesellschaft der hamburgischen Hafenanlagen. As well as operating the port facilities, it was also responsible for their upkeep and expansion. In 1939, the company was renamed, becoming Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-Aktiengesellschaft (HHLA).[36] During World War II, HHLA employed forced labour.[46] Allied bombers attacked the Port of Hamburg multiple times, destroying large parts of it.[47]

1945–2007[edit]

The Second World War ended in May 1945. The Port of Hamburg had suffered further damage. Around 90% of the quay shed area was destroyed, and two thirds of the warehouses were left unusable. Large parts of the quay walls lay in ruins. Almost 3,000 shipwrecks prevented regulated shipping movements. The reconstruction of the port was largely completed by 1956.[48]

1967 saw the opening of the “Übersee-Zentrum”. It was, at the time, the world’s largest distribution shed and was used as a distribution facility for mixed break bulk cargo.[49] It remained in use until 2016.[50] The first container ship docked in the Port of Hamburg in 1968. It was handled at Burchardkai – where HHLA later built the Container Terminal Burchardkai – using container cranes.[51] In 1970, new port order regulations relieved HHLA of all sovereign functions. This created competition between companies in the port industry.[52] In 1978, HHLA opened its new fruit and cooling centre for fruit and refrigerated goods, which has been modernised multiple times in the years since.[53]

In 1990, many of the former Eastern Bloc states became independent after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The Port of Hamburg was soon able to resume handling cargo for these countries (its Hinterland was now much larger). HHLA began to invest in a number of companies that organised container transport on the railway network, and the volume of cargo that they handled rose.[54] The first container ship was handled at the new Container Terminal Altenwerder (CTA) on 25 June 2002.[55] On 1 October 2005, the company changed its name to Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG. The abbreviation HHLA remained.[56]

Since 2007[edit]

HHLA was retroactively split into the subgroups Port Logistics and Real Estate with effect from 1 January 2007.[57] On 2 November 2007, the Port Logistics subgroup was listed on the stock exchange.[7] Since its initial public offering, HHLA shares have been traded on the Prime Standard at the Frankfurt Stock Exchange and the Hamburg Stock Exchange.[58]

Gallery[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Oliver Driesen: Welt im Fluss. Hamburgs Hafen, die HHLA und die Globalisierung. Hoffmann und Campe, Hamburg 2010, ISBN 978-3-455-50139-1.
  • 125 Jahre HHLA. Die Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG feiert Jubiläum. In: Hansa, Heft 2/2010, p. 68–71, Schiffahrts-Verlag Hansa, Hamburg 2010, ISSN 0017-7504
  • Arnold Kludas, Dieter Maass, Susanne Sabisch: Hafen Hamburg. Die Geschichte des Hamburger Freihafens von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart. Kabel, Hamburg 1988, ISBN 3-8225-0089-5.
  • Helmuth Kern: Die Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-Aktiengesellschaft: Porträt eines landeseigenen Unternehmens im freien Wettbewerb. In: Zeitschrift für öffentliche und gemeinwirtschaftliche Unternehmen, Bd. 6, H. 2 (1983), pp. 163–168.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Helmuth Kern: Die Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-Aktiengesellschaft: Porträt eines landeseigenen Unternehmens im freien Wettbewerb. In: Zeitschrift für öffentliche und gemeinwirtschaftliche Unternehmen, Bd. 6, H. 2 (1983), pp. 163–168, here p. 163.
  2. ^ HHLA. "Executive Board". hhla.de. Website of the company
  3. ^ HHLA. "Members of the Supervisory Board". hhla.de. Website of the company
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i HHLA. "Annual Report 2019" (PDF).
  5. ^ Birger Nicolai (2010-03-01). "Die HHLA feiert im März ihren 125. Geburtstag". Die Welt.
  6. ^ "EBIT der Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA) für die Jahre 2008 bis 2019 (in Millionen Euro)". Statista. 2020-03-01.
  7. ^ a b "HHLA-Börsengang versetzt Senat in Jubelstimmung". Der Spiegel (online). 2007-11-02.
  8. ^ "HHLA Aktie". boerse.de.
  9. ^ "MDax begrüßt weitere Immobilienfirma". n-tv. 2013-06-06.
  10. ^ "HHLA drängt auf rasche Elbvertiefung". Deutsche Logistik-Zeitung. 2018-06-13.
  11. ^ Behörde für Stadtentwicklung und Umwelt (2012-04-01). "Anlage zur Drs. 20/4388. Speicherstadt Hamburg. Entwicklungskonzept" (PDF). Website of Hamburgische Bürgerschaft. Mitteilung des Senats an die Bürgerschaft. Konzept für die künftige Entwicklung der Speicherstadt sowie Stellungnahme des Senats zum Bürgerschaftlichen Ersuchen vom 22. April 2010 „Kreative Milieus: Flächen in der Speicherstadt aktivieren und bereitstellen“ – Drucksache 19/5853 p. 13 und p. 106.
  12. ^ The fourth is operated by Eurogate.
  13. ^ "Technical data Altenwerder (CTA)".
  14. ^ "Technical data Burchardkai (CTB)".
  15. ^ "Technical data Tollerort (CTT)".
  16. ^ Frieder Schwitzgebel (2019-04-02). "Hafen der Zukunft – das Containerterminal Altenwerder (CTA)". logistik-aktuell.com.
  17. ^ Olaf Preuß (2018-10-23). "Hapag-Lloyd holt Linien nach Hamburg". Die Welt.
  18. ^ Tobias Bruns (2019-11-05). "Neue Containerbrücken für den Burchardkai erreichen den Hamburger Hafen". schiffsjournal.de.
  19. ^ Kira Oster (2018-05-31). "50 Jahre Containerumschlag: Von Stahlkisten, die die Welt veränderten". shz.
  20. ^ Preuß, Olaf (2019-03-05). "HHLA in Odessa: Das Tor zur Welt". DIE WELT. Retrieved 2020-06-09.
  21. ^ Terminalbetreiber in Estland gekauft. In: Schiff & Hafen, Heft 7/2018, p. 9.
  22. ^ "HHLA Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG: Intermodal".
  23. ^ Containerverkehr auf der Schiene wird neu geordnet. In: Täglicher Hafenbericht, April 30, 2012, p. 1.
  24. ^ "Mehr Zeit, mehr Raum". Deutsche Logistik-Zeitung. 2015-10-26.
  25. ^ "Deutsche Bahn und HHLA entflechten Intermodalbeteiligungen". VerkehrsRundschau. 2012-04-27.
  26. ^ "HHLA fusioniert Polzug mit Metrans". Deutsche Logistik-Zeitung.
  27. ^ "Services".
  28. ^ "HHLA: Alles Banane am Hamburger O'Swaldkai". Hamburger Abendblatt. 2011-09-14.
  29. ^ Oliver Lieber: Hafen versus Stadt. Konfliktanalyse der Flächenkonkurrenz zwischen Hafenwirtschaft und Stadtentwicklung in Hamburg. Springer Fachmedien, Wiesbaden 2018, p. 79, ISBN 978-3-658-22633-6.
  30. ^ "Hansaport: Thurnwald löst Meller ab". Deutsche Logistik-Zeitung. 2016-06-30.
  31. ^ "Development with responsibility".
  32. ^ Martin Kopp (2019-03-27). "Container sollen mit Drohnen durch den Hafen fliegen". Hamburger Abendblatt.
  33. ^ Sebastian Reimann (2019-03-27). "HHLA investiert in 3D-Druck". Deutsche Logistik-Zeitung.
  34. ^ Michael Kroker (2018-12-05). "„Hyperloop ergibt auf kurzen Strecken wenig Sinn"". Wirtschaftswoche.
  35. ^ "HPC implements machine learning to predict dwell time". Global Cargo News. 14 July 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2020.
  36. ^ a b Christine Zeuner: Erwachsenenbildung in Hamburg 1945–1972. Institutionen und Profile, Münster, Hamburg 2000, p. 264, ISBN 3-8258-5080-3.
  37. ^ Helmuth Kern: Die Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-Aktiengesellschaft: Porträt eines landeseigenen Unternehmens im freien Wettbewerb. In: Zeitschrift für öffentliche und gemeinwirtschaftliche Unternehmen, Bd. 6, H. 2 (1983), p. 163–168, here p. 164.
  38. ^ Ralf Lange (2015-06-01). "Die Hamburger Speicherstadt". Stadtentwicklung zur Moderne. Die Entstehung großstädtischer Hafen- und Bürohausquartiere. Urban Development towards Modernism. The Birth of the Metropolitan Harbour and Commercial Districts], p. 64–78, here p. 74.
  39. ^ Dirk Schubert (2015-06-01). "Hamburg – Amphibische Stadt im (inter-)nationalen Kontext". Stadtentwicklung zur Moderne. Die Entstehung großstädtischer Hafen- und Bürohausquartiere. Urban Development towards Modernism. The Birth of the Metropolitan Harbour and Commercial Districts], p. 53–61, here p. 58.
  40. ^ "Der Seekrieg". Lebendiges Museum Online.
  41. ^ "Wo Hamburg an den Ersten Weltkrieg erinnert". Norddeutscher Rundfunk. 2014-07-30.
  42. ^ Wolfgang Müller (2020-01-11). "Versailler Vertrag: Fragen und Antworten". Norddeutscher Rundfunk.
  43. ^ "Hapag-Lloyd: Über 150 Jahre Tradition". Rheinische Post. 2004-09-07.
  44. ^ Arnold Kludas, Dieter Maass, Susanne Sabisch: Hafen Hamburg. Die Geschichte des Hamburger Freihafens von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart. Kabel, Hamburg 1988, p. 50, ISBN 3-8225-0089-5.
  45. ^ Nikolaus Wolf (2016-01-28). "Vom Kaiserreich bis zum Zweiten Weltkrieg: Wachstum und Krise". Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung (online).
  46. ^ "Zwangsarbeit in der Hamburger Kriegswirtschaft 1939–1945". zwangsarbeit-in-hamburg.de (in German).
  47. ^ Helmut Schmidt (1951). "Der Hafen von Hamburg" (PDF). Wirtschaftsdienst (Vol. 31, Heft 4, p. 41–44, here p. 41).
  48. ^ Gert Kähler, Sandra Schürmann (2010). "Spuren der Geschichte. Hamburg, sein Hafen und die Hafencity" (PDF). Arbeitshefte zur Hafencity. HafenCity Hamburg GmbH. p. 77 f.
  49. ^ "Hamburg damals: Das Überseezentrum". Norddeutscher Rundfunk. 2017-02-12.
  50. ^ Friederike Ulrich (2017-09-15). "Hier entsteht Hamburgs neuer Stadtteil". Hamburger Abendblatt.
  51. ^ "Containerschiffe: Beginn einer neuen Ära". Norddeutscher Rundfunk. 2018-05-30.
  52. ^ Gert Kähler, Sandra Schürmann (2010). "Spuren der Geschichte. Hamburg, sein Hafen und die Hafencity" (PDF). Arbeitshefte zur Hafencity. HafenCity Hamburg GmbH. p. 38.
  53. ^ "Qualität im Fruchtumschlag". Hamburger Abendblatt. 2014-09-04. Archived from the original on 2015-10-15.
  54. ^ Gert Kähler, Sandra Schürmann (2010). "Spuren der Geschichte. Hamburg, sein Hafen und die Hafencity" (PDF). Arbeitshefte zur Hafencity. HafenCity Hamburg GmbH. p. 89 f.
  55. ^ "Seit einem Jahr in Betrieb: Container Terminal Altenwerder". VerkehrsRundschau. 2003-06-25.
  56. ^ "Neuer Name für Hamburger Hafen- und Lagerhaus-AG". VerkehrsRundschau. 2005-09-30.
  57. ^ "HHLA langfristiger Kauf". boerse.de. 2010-02-11.
  58. ^ HHLA. "Basic data". hhla.de.

External links[edit]