Impeach (motion)

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Impeach
Class Incidental main
Requires second? Yes
Debatable? Yes
May be reconsidered? A decision or finding favorable to accused may not be reconsidered, but an unfavorable decision can be reconsidered.
Amendable? Yes

The motion to impeach is used to bring an accusation against a person. A majority vote is needed to put the accused on trial.[1] A majority vote convicts for a minor offense, and a two-thirds vote for a major offense. A vote of censure or reprimand requires majority vote, and suspension or expulsion a two-thirds vote.[2]

Robert's Rules of Order does not have a motion to impeach. However, this book requires a fair disciplinary process which includes appointing a committee to conduct a confidential investigation, report of the committee and preferral of charges if warranted, formal notification of the accused, and trial;[3] and a two-thirds vote is required to expel.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Demeter, George (1969). Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, 1969 ed., p. 265
  2. ^ Demeter, George (1969). Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, 1969 ed., p. 268
  3. ^ Robert, Henry M.; et al. (2011). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised (11th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Da Capo Press. p. 656. ISBN 978-0-306-82020-5. 
  4. ^ Robert 2011, p. 668