James Cavendish (MP for Derby)

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James Cavendish (standing) with William Cavendish (left), Elihu Yale (center), and other people (right)
Staveley Hall, Derbyshire

Lord James Cavendish FRS (bef. 1707 – 14 December 1751) of Staveley Hall, Derbyshire was a British Whig politician who sat in the English House of Commons between 1701 and 1707 and in the British House of Commons between 1707 and 1742.

Early life[edit]

Cavendish was the third son of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire and his wife Lady Mary Butler, daughter of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde. He travelled abroad in France and Italy from 1696 to 1698 and attended Padua University in 1697.

Career[edit]

Cavendish was returned as Member of Parliament for Derby in both the general elections of 1701. He did not stand in 1702, but was elected in a contest at the 1705 English general election, defeating the sitting Tories. He voted for the Court candidate in the contest for Speaker on 25 October 1705 and supported the Court on the regency bill proceedings on 18 February 1706. He was returned unopposed for Derby at the 1708 general election. He acted as a teller on the petition of defeated Whig candidates at Coventry and later voted for the naturalization bill in 1709 and for the impeachment of Dr Sacheverell in 1710. At the 1710 British general election, he was defeated in a contest for Derby and decided not to stand in 1713.[1]

Cavendish was returned as MP for Derby at the 1715 general election and voted for the septennial bill in 1716 and the repeal of the Occasional Conformity and Schism Acts in 1719. He was returned unopposed at the 1722 and 1727 general elections. In the latter parliament he took an independent line, and voted against the Government on the Hessians 1730, the army 1732, and the repeal of the Septennial Act 1734, but with them on the civil list 1729, and the excise bill 1733. He was elected in a contest at Derby in 1734 and voted for the place bill 1740. He was returned unopposed at the 1741 general election, but on 8 March 1742 he vacated his seat to take up the post of Auditor of Foreign Accounts or Imposts in Ireland. He did not stand again for Derby at the ensuing by-election.[2]

Death and legacy[edit]

Cavendish married with £8,000 Anne Yale (died 1734), daughter of Elihu Yale on 6 July 1708. They had two children:

  • William Cavendish (died July 1751) who married Barbara Chandler. They had no children, and his widow married secondly John Fitzwilliam
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, married Richard Chandler in February 1722

As his only son predeceased him by a few months, his heir was his son-in-law Richard Chandler, who subsequently adopted the name of Cavendish.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CAVENDISH, Lord James (c.1678-1751), of Staveley, Derbys. and Latimer, Bucks". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  2. ^ "CAVENDISH, Lord James (aft.1673-1751), of Staveley, Derbys". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  3. ^ Deed Poll Office: Private Act of Parliament 1751 (25 Geo. 2). c. 28
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Lord Henry Cavendish
George Vernon
Member of Parliament for Derby
1701–1702
With: Sir Charles Pye 1701
John Harpur 1701–1702
Succeeded by
John Harpur
Thomas Stanhope
Preceded by
John Harpur
Thomas Stanhope
Member of Parliament for Derby
1705–1707
With: Sir Thomas Parker
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Derby
1707–1710
With: Sir Thomas Parker 1707–1710
Richard Pye 1710
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Levinge, Bt
John Harpur
Preceded by
Edward Mundy
Nathaniel Curzon
Member of Parliament for Derby
1715–1742
With: William Stanhope 1715–1722, 1727–1730
Thomas Bayley 1722–1727
Charles Stanhope 1730–1736
John Stanhope 1736–1742
Succeeded by
John Stanhope
Viscount Duncannon