Jerry Marotta

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Jerry Marotta
Jerry Marotta, drummer.jpg
Background information
Birth name Jerome David Marotta
Born (1956-02-06) February 6, 1956 (age 59)
Cleveland, Ohio, United States
Occupation(s) Drummer, photographer
Instruments Drums, percussion
Years active 1973–present
Associated acts Arthur, Hurley & Gottlieb, Orleans, Peter Gabriel, Hall & Oates, Indigo Girls, Stackridge, Sevendys, Tony Levin
Notable instruments

Jerome David "Jerry" Marotta (born February 6, 1956 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American drummer currently residing in Woodstock, New York. He is the brother of Rick Marotta, who is also a drummer and composer.


Marotta was a member of the bands Arthur, Hurley & Gottlieb (1973–75) Orleans (1976–77 & 1982), Peter Gabriel's band (1977–86), Hall & Oates (1979–81), the Indigo Girls (1991–99), Stackridge (2011), Sevendys (2010–present) and The Tony Levin Band (1995 to present).[1]

Marotta also played drums on Stevie Nicks and Michael Campbell's song "Whole Lotta Trouble" from Nicks' 1989 album The Other Side of the Mirror. He has also performed on albums by Ani DiFranco, Sarah McLachlan, Marshall Crenshaw, The Dream Academy, Suzanne Vega, Carlene Carter, John Mayer, Iggy Pop, Tears for Fears, Elvis Costello, Cher, Paul McCartney, Carly Simon, Peter Gabriel, Lawrence Gowan, Ron Sexsmith, Banda do Casaco and many others.

In addition to his work as a studio and stage drummer, he is a singer, composer and record producer. In 1996 he produced Ellis Paul's A Carnival of Voices.[2]He is currently touring with The Security Project. Marotta currently lives in Woodstock, New York with his wife.


With Orleans[edit]

  • Waking and Dreaming
  • Orleans (1980 album)
  • One of a Kind
  • We're Still Having Fun: The Best of Orleans

With Peter Gabriel[edit]

With Hall & Oates[edit]

With Indigo Girls[edit]

With Tony Levin[edit]

With Stevie Nicks[edit]

With others[edit]

Chasin' Gus' Ghost 1999


  1. ^ NNDB Website Retrieved March 10, 2007.
  2. ^ FAME (Folk & Music Exchange) Website Retrieved March 10, 2007.

External links[edit]