Jun Mizutani

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Jun Mizutani
Mondial Ping - Men's Doubles - Semifinals - 46 (cropped).jpg
Personal information
Nationality  Japan
Born (1989-06-09) June 9, 1989 (age 27)[1]
Iwata, Shizuoka, Japan
Playing style Left-handed, Shakehand grip
Equipment(s) Butterfly, Blade Mizutani Jun Super ZLC, Rubbers Tenergy 64 in the forehand, and Tenergy 80 in the backhand.
Highest ranking 5 (September 2015)[2]
Current ranking 5 (August 2016)
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7 12 in)
Weight 68 kg (150 lb; 10.7 st)

Jun Mizutani (Japanese: 水谷 隼; born 9 June 1989) is a male Japanese table tennis player.[1] He became the youngest Japanese national champion at the age of 17.[3] His consecutive singles titles at the national championships from 2007 to 2011 made him the first man to win the event five times in a row.[4]

As of August 2016, he is ranked number 6 player in the world by the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF).[2]

After defeating Vladimir Samsonov for the bronze medal by 4-1 in the 2016 Rio Olympics, he finally seized his first singles medal in the three main international tournaments. It was also the first Olympics table tennis singles medal of his country.

Career records[edit]

Singles (as of August 12, 2016)[5]

Men's Doubles

  • World Championships: SF (2009).
  • ITTF World Tour winner (2): China (Suzhou), Japan Open 2009. Runner-up (4): Chinese Taipei Open 2006; German, English Open 2009; Hungarian Open 2010.
  • Asian Games: QF (2006).
  • Asian Championships: SF (2007).

Mixed Doubles

  • World Championships: round of 16 (2009).

Team

  • Olympics: 5th (2008), 2nd (2016).
  • World Championships: 3rd (2008, 10, 12, 14), 2nd (2016).
  • World Team Cup: 5th (2009).
  • Asian Games: SF (2010, 14).
  • Asian Championships: 2nd (2007, 09, 12, 13).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "ITTF player's profiles". International Table Tennis Federation. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "ITTF world ranking". International Table Tennis Federation. Retrieved January 5, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Mizutani, Hirano claim third titles". Kyodo News. January 19, 2009. Retrieved January 24, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Mizutani makes table tennis history". Kyodo News. January 24, 2011. Retrieved January 24, 2011. 
  5. ^ "ITTF Statistics". International Table Tennis Federation. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Jun Mizutani's Biography and Olympic Results". Sports Reference. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Jun Mizutani wins 2014 ITTF World Tour Grand Finals". Meniscus Magazine. Retrieved January 10, 2015.