Kendall Gill

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Kendall Gill
Kendall Gill 2010.jpg
Gill in 2010
Personal information
Born (1968-05-25) May 25, 1968 (age 51)
Chicago, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Listed weight197 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High schoolRich Central
(Olympia Fields, Illinois)
CollegeIllinois (1986–1990)
NBA draft1990 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5th overall
Selected by the Charlotte Hornets
Playing career1990–2005
PositionShooting guard / Small forward
Number13, 9, 12
Career history
19901993Charlotte Hornets
19931995Seattle SuperSonics
1995–1996Charlotte Hornets
19962001New Jersey Nets
2001–2002Miami Heat
2002–2003Minnesota Timberwolves
2003–2004Chicago Bulls
2004–2005Milwaukee Bucks
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points12,914 (13.4 ppg)
Rebounds4,002 (4.1 rpg)
Steals1,519 (1.6 spg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Kendall Cedric Gill (born May 25, 1968) is an America Chicago-born retired professional basketball player who now works as a television basketball analyst.[1] During his professional career he played for seven NBA teams including the Charlotte Hornets, the Seattle Supersonics, the Miami Heat and several others. He has offered pre- and post-game coverage of the Chicago Bulls for the local Comcast affiliate.

Early life[edit]

Gill was born in Chicago and attended Rich Central High School in Olympia Fields, Illinois. Graduating in 1986 as a senior, he led Rich Central to a second-place finish in the IHSA class AA state boys basketball tournament. Gill led his team in scoring with 54 points in the four games of the tournament finals, and was named to the six-player All-Tournament team.

After high school, Gill attended the University of Illinois. Playing four years for the Fighting Illini, he was a starter in his last three seasons. As a junior, Gill led the Fighting Illini to the 1989 Final Four before losing to Michigan on a last-second shot. Also among that fabled "Flyin' Illini" squadron were future NBA players Nick Anderson, Marcus Liberty, Kenny Battle and Illini TV/radio broadcaster Stephen Bardo as well as four-year starter Lowell Hamilton. As a senior, Gill led the Big Ten in scoring and was named a first-team All-American (UPI). He left Illinois as the seventh-leading scorer in school history. Gill's Illini earned NCAA bids each year he played. He also won the NCAA Slam Dunk championship in the Final Four his senior season.

Gill was elected to the "Illini Men's Basketball All-Century Team" in 2004.

NBA career[edit]

Gill was chosen in the 1990 NBA draft as the fifth overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets, and was named First Team All-Rookie for the 1990–91 season. During this same season, Gill participated in the NBA Slam-Dunk Competition. He had a tough time as a rookie trying to fit into the Hornets rotation, alongside already established back-court teammates Muggsy Bogues and Rex Chapman.

After the 1991 addition of Larry Johnson and departure of Rex Chapman to the Washington Bullets, Gill had a breakthrough year in the 1991–92 season by averaging 20.5 points, 5.1 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game, while shooting 46.7% from the field.

In 1993, Gill helped the Hornets reach the NBA postseason for the first time in franchise history, however, he was traded to the Seattle SuperSonics during the following off-season. The SuperSonics, who also added Detlef Schrempf that same summer, put together a team led by Gary Payton and Shawn Kemp. Unfortunately for Gill and the SuperSonics, even with an all-star caliber team, they suffered two first round eliminations by the Denver Nuggets in 1994 and the Los Angeles Lakers in 1995. Gill would return to Charlotte for the 1995–96 season but in January of 1996, the Hornets dealt Gill and Khalid Reeves to the New Jersey Nets for Kenny Anderson, who became the team's starting point guard while Bogues sat out with a knee injury that only limited him to just six games for the entire season. Gill would suffer an injury that would limit him to only 11 games for the remainder of the season.

For the remainder of the 1990s Gill would play for the Nets, helping the team reach the 1998 playoffs and leading the league in steals in 1998–99. On April 3, 1999, Gill recorded 11 steals in a game against the Miami Heat, tying a single-game record set by Larry Kenon during the 1976–77 season. In this game, he also recorded 15 points and 10 rebounds for a rare points-rebounds-steals triple-double. Gill's final season in New Jersey, the 2000–01 season, was shortened by injury, allowing him to play in only 31 games during the season.

In his final four seasons in the NBA, Gill would play the 2001-02 season with the Miami Heat, the 2002–03 season with the Minnesota Timberwolves, and the 2003–04 season with the Chicago Bulls, before completing his career with the Milwaukee Bucks in 2004.

In his 15 seasons in the NBA, Gill played in 966 games for seven teams. He also appeared in 27 playoff games for four different teams. He was a member of the NBA All-Rookie Team in 1991 and went on to compile 12,914 points, 2,945 assists, and 4,002 rebounds during his career.

Personal life[edit]

Gill was brought up in Matteson, Illinois.[2]

As a means to maintain his conditioning, Gill took up boxing, eventually entering the professional ranks. Gill had his first bout on June 25, 2005 at the age of 37.

In 1994, Gill made an appearance as himself in a Nickelodeon TV show My Brother and Me. He appeared on the January 23, 2008 edition of Spike TV's Pros vs. Joes.

On May 15, 2010, Gill sang a rendition of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" at Wrigley Field, home of the Chicago Cubs, as they took on the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Gill has provided analysis during pregame and postgame shows on Comcast SportsNet Chicago for Chicago Bulls games. On March 22, 2013, Gill was suspended by Comcast SportsNet for the remainder of the 2012–13 season after a reported physical altercation with analyst Tim Doyle in the Comcast SportsNet newsroom.[3] In September 2013, Gill indicated that he was not returning to the station. However, he was rehired by Comcast SportsNet in late 2015.[4]

In 2017, Gill was signed as a free agent in the BIG3 basketball league by Power to take the place of Corey Maggette after he suffered an injury during the season.

Honors[edit]

High school[edit]

  • 1986 – IHSA State Tournament All-Tournament Team[5]
  • 1992 – Inducted into the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association's Hall of Fame as a player[6]

College[edit]

NBA[edit]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
* Led the league

NBA[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1990–91 Charlotte 82 36 23.7 .450 .143 .835 3.2 3.7 1.3 .5 11.0
1991–92 Charlotte 79 79 36.8 .467 .240 .745 5.1 4.2 1.9 .6 20.5
1992–93 Charlotte 69 67 35.2 .449 .274 .772 4.9 3.9 1.4 .5 16.9
1993–94 Seattle 79 77 30.8 .443 .317 .782 3.4 3.5 1.9 .4 14.1
1994–95 Seattle 73 58 29.1 .457 .368 .742 4.0 2.6 1.6 .4 13.7
1995–96 Charlotte 36 36 35.1 .481 .315 .761 5.3 6.3 1.2 .6 12.9
1995–96 New Jersey 11 10 38.0 .441 .360 .831 3.9 3.2 2.0 .2 17.5
1996–97 New Jersey 82 81 39.0 .443 .336 .797 6.1 4.0 1.9 .6 21.8
1997–98 New Jersey 81 81 33.7 .429 .257 .688 4.8 2.5 1.9 .8 13.4
1998–99 New Jersey 50 47 32.1 .398 .118 .683 4.9 2.5 2.7* .5 11.8
1999–2000 New Jersey 76 75 31.0 .414 .256 .710 3.7 2.8 1.8 .5 13.1
2000–01 New Jersey 31 26 28.8 .331 .286 .722 4.2 2.8 1.5 .2 9.1
2001–02 Miami 65 49 21.7 .384 .136 .677 2.8 1.5 .7 .1 5.7
2002–03 Minnesota 82 34 25.2 .422 .322 .764 3.0 1.9 1.0 .2 8.7
2003–04 Chicago 56 35 25.2 .392 .237 .735 3.4 1.6 1.2 .3 9.6
2004–05 Milwaukee 14 0 20.3 .400 .333 .900 2.6 1.9 1.0 .3 6.1
Career 966 791 30.5 .434 .300 .754 4.1 3.0 1.6 .4 13.4

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1993 Charlotte 9 9 39.2 .401 .167 .714 5.1 2.9 2.3 .7 17.3
1994 Seattle 5 5 30.6 .433 .222 .619 4.8 2.0 1.2 .2 13.4
1995 Seattle 4 0 18.0 .360 .250 .625 1.0 2.5 1.0 .3 6.3
1998 New Jersey 3 3 33.3 .450 .875 4.3 1.0 1.3 .3 14.3
2003 Minnesota 6 0 19.7 .370 .500 .643 2.2 1.2 .7 .2 5.2
Career 27 17 29.5 .408 .259 .686 3.7 2.1 1.4 .4 11.9

College[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1986–87 Illinois 31 0 11.1 .482 .000 .642 1.4 .9 1.3 .3 3.7
1987–88 Illinois 33 23 28.7 .471 .304 .753 2.2 4.2 2.0 .1 10.4
1988–89 Illinois 24 18 28.4 .542 .458 .793 2.9 3.8 2.1 .3 15.4
1989–90 Illinois 29 29 34.5 .500 .348 .777 4.9 3.3 2.2 .6 20.0
Career 117 70 25.4 .501 .374 .755 2.8 3.0 1.9 .3 12.0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bulls legend Van Lier mourned". ESPN.com. March 3, 2009. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  2. ^ Arvia, Phil (March 6, 2015). "The fall of the Norman castle". Daily Southtown. Archived from the original on February 23, 2019. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  3. ^ Mitchell, Fred (March 22, 2013). "Gill out for season as Bulls analyst". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2019. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  4. ^ Johnson, K. C. (December 17, 2015). "Kendall Gill grateful for second chance with CSN for Bulls analysis". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2019. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  5. ^ "1986 Class AA Boys Summary". ihsa.org. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  6. ^ "Basketball Museum of Illinois - Players". basketballmuseumofillinois.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  7. ^ "2018–19 Illinois basketball record book" (PDF). fightingillini.com. p. 84. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  8. ^ "Illinois Athletics Hall of Fame - Kendall Gill". Illinois Athletics Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  9. ^ Perley, Sam (October 22, 2018). "Gill Named 9th on Hornets 30th Anniversary Team". NBA.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.

External links[edit]