Kenny, Australian Capital Territory

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Kenny
CanberraAustralian Capital Territory
Kenny, Australian Capital Territory.jpg
Coordinates 35°12′47″S 149°09′18″E / 35.213°S 149.155°E / -35.213; 149.155Coordinates: 35°12′47″S 149°09′18″E / 35.213°S 149.155°E / -35.213; 149.155
Postcode(s) 2911
District Gungahlin
Territory electorate(s) Yerrabi
Federal Division(s) Fenner
Suburbs around Kenny:
Harrison Throsby
Franklin Kenny Watson
Mitchell Mitchell Watson

Kenny is a designated suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. The suburb is named in honour of Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian who pioneered muscle rehabilitation practices which serve as the foundation of physiotherapy. It is adjacent to the suburbs of Watson, the Mitchell industrial estate, Harrison and Throsby and bounded by the Federal Highway to the east and Horse park drive to the north. The suburb Kenny is situated about 4 km from the Gungahlin Towncentre and 8 km from the centre of Canberra.

History[edit]

Portions of Kenny are currently occupied by the rural properties Bendoura, and Canberra Park. 'Canberra Park' was established by William Ginn, who previously worked for George Campbell, of Duntroon, and lived at Blundell's Cottage from 1859[1] The cottage named after a later resident George Blundell was located near to what was until the 1960s the Molonglo River and since then by Lake Burley Griffin. Ploughman William Ginn and his family were the first to live in the farmhouse, departing ten years later when they moved to 'Canberra Park'.

Geology[edit]

In 2009 Kenny was still a greenfield in front of the Federal Highway

Located in the suburb is part of Sullivans Creek, which flows on into Mitchell. This is the lowest point at 582 metres (1,909 ft). The high side is on the east, with creeks flowing in the south west direction. The suburb is fairly flat. The geology of the area is mudstone and shale from the Canberra Formation of middle Silurian age. Around the creeks is plenty of alluvium.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 3 February 1953, Miss Gertrude Ginn, The Canberra Times
  2. ^ Henderson G A M and Matveev G, Geology of Canberra, Queanbeyan and Environs 1:50000 1980.