Kristina Brandi

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Kristina Brandi
Country (sports)  Puerto Rico
Born (1977-03-29) March 29, 1977 (age 41)
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Turned pro 1995
Retired 2007
Plays Right-handed
Prize money $ 1,248,528
Singles
Career record 441–333
Career titles 1 WTA, 16 ITF
Highest ranking No. 27 (4 December 2000)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (2000)
French Open 2R (2000, 2005)
Wimbledon 4R (2000)
US Open 2R (1996, 2000, 2004)
Doubles
Career record 48–86
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 246 (June 19, 1995)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2006)
French Open 1R (2005)
Wimbledon 1R (2005)
US Open 1R (1999, 2005)

Kristina Brandi (born March 29, 1977) is a former Puerto Rican tennis player. She was the first tennis player representing Puerto Rico to win a singles match in an Olympic tennis match.

Early years[edit]

Brandi was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where she became interested in the sport of tennis at an early age. She made her professional debut in 1995 when she was 17 years old.[1] Her father is Joe Brandi, who coached Pete Sampras.

USTA Circuit[edit]

In 2003, Brandi won the most titles of any woman on the "USTA Circuit".[citation needed] She took home trophies from six events. Brandi was a member of the 2003 Puerto Rican Fed Cup Team where she captured the singles championship at the $75,000 event in Albuquerque, New Mexico plus, the $50,000 event in Troy, Alabama and $25,000 in Peachtree City, Georgia.[2]

2004 Olympics[edit]

Brandi represented Puerto Rico in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. She became the first tennis player representing Puerto Rico to win a singles match in an Olympic when she beat Jelena Kostanić from Croatia (7–5 and 6–1). She lost in the second round to Russian Anastasia Myskina.[3]

Some of Brandi's career highlights are: High rank for singles 27 on January 1, 2001; High rank for doubles on June 19, 1995; Career titles for singles: 1; Career matches won: 79; Career matches lost: 99; Career prize money $845, 170.[2]

Later years[edit]

Kristina Brandi resides in Tampa, Florida and continued to be active in the WTA tours for many years after the 2004 Olympic Games.

Brandi defended her ITF-Surbiton title defeating Laura Granville from the USA. Brandi's grass season plans for 2006 included the Main Draw of the Birmingham Tournament at the WTA Tour level as well as the qualifying tournament at Eastbourne before heading to compete in the Wimbledon main draw.

Brandi, who has since retired, is the niece of Andy Brandi who played for the Trinity Tigers men's tennis team in NCAA Division I competition.[4]

WTA Tour finals[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam
WTA Tour Championship
Tier I
Tier II
Tier III
Tier IV and V

Singles (1 title)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. June 20, 1999 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands Grass Croatia Silvija Talaja 6–0, 3–6, 6–1

ITF Singles Finals 25 (16-9)[edit]

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Titles by surface
Hard (13–7)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (3–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 4 July 1994 Indianapolis, United States Hard United States Mashona Washington 6-1, 6-3
Runner-up 2. 25 July 1994 Roanoke, United States Hard Japan Keiko Nagatomi 6-7, 3-6
Runner-up 3. 9 October 1995 Sedona, United States Hard United States Tami Whitlinger 4-6, 4-6
Runner-up 4. 6 April 1997 Phoenix, United States Hard China Li Fang 1-6 2-6
Winner 5. 26 January 1998 Clearwater, United States Hard United States Mashona Washington 6-1, 6-2
Winner 6. 5 April 1998 Phoenix, United States Hard United States Lilia Osterloh 6-0 6-4
Winner 7. 20 July 1998 Peachtree, United States Hard Luxembourg Anne Kremer 6-3 6-3
Runner-up 8. 2 August 1998 Salt Lake City, United States Hard South Africa Mariaan de Swardt 2-6 2-6
Winner 9. 1 November 1998 Austin, United States Hard United States Meilen Tu 3-6 6-3 6-4
Winner 10. 1 August 1999 Salt Lake City, United States Hard China Li Fang 6-4 6-3
Runner-up 11. 30 April 2000 Sarasota, United States Hard United States Meghann Shaughnessy 1-6 3-6
Runner-up 12. 4 June 2001 Surbiton, United Kingdom Grass Japan Rika Fujiwara 3-6 3-6
Winner 13. 13 May 2003 Charlottesville, United States Clay Australia Christina Wheeler 4-6 6-4 6-2
Winner 14. 8 June 2003 Surbiton, United Kingdom Grass South Korea Cho Yoon-jeong 6-1 6-3
Winner 15. 08 July 2003 College Park, United States Hard Russia Lioudmila Skavronskaia 6-1 6-1
Winner 16. 28 July 2003 Louisville, United States Hard United States Shenay Perry 3-6 6-4 6-4
Winner 17. 14 September 2003 Peachtree, United States Hard United States Allison Bradshaw 6-0 6-1
Winner 18. 22 September 2003 Albuquerque, United States Hard Venezuela Milagros Sequera 6-2 6-2
Winner 19. 5 October 2003 Troy, United States Hard Italy Maria Elena Camerin 7-6(9-7), 6-3
Runner-up 20. 19 October 2003 Sedona, United States Hard Puerto Rico Samantha Reeves 5-7 6-1 4-6
Winner 21. 4 June 2005 Surbiton, United Kingdom Grass United States Laura Granville 6-3 6-1
Runner-up 22. 2 October 2005 Ashland, United States Hard Thailand Napaporn Tongsalee 4-6 6-2 4-6
Winner 23. 16 October 2005 San Francisco, United States Hard United States Lilia Osterloh 5-7 6-4 6-4
Winner 24. 10 June 2006 Surbiton, United Kingdom Grass United States Laura Granville 7-5 6-0
Runner-up 25. 19 September 2006 Albuquerque, United States Hard Ahsha Rolle 2-6 4-6

Doubles: 6 (1–5)[edit]

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Runner-up 1. 20 June 1994 Hilton Head Island, United States Clay United States Karin Miller United States Angela Lettiere
United States Stacey Sheppard
6-4, 2-6, 6-7
Winner 2. 4 July 1994 Indianapolis, United States Hard United States Karin Miller United States Angela Lettiere
Commonwealth of Independent States Vera Vitels
6-2, 4-6, 7-6
Runner-up 3. 25 July 1994 Roanoke, United States Hard United States Karin Miller Australia Gail Biggs
New Zealand Claudine Toleafoa
6-4, 3-6, 5-7
Runner-up 4. 1 February 1998 Clearwater, United States Hard United States Karin Miller Canada Maureen Drake
Canada Renata Kolbovic
6-4 3-6 4-6
Runner-up 5. 10 September 2002 Peachtree, United States Hard United States Allison Baker United States Jennifer Russell
Australia Christina Wheeler
2–6 6–7(3-7)
Runner-up 6. 8 July 2003 College Park, United States Hard South Africa Kim Grant United States Jennifer Russell
Australia Lisa McShea
2–6 6–4 5–7

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tennis
  2. ^ a b Sports Illustrated
  3. ^ Olympic results
  4. ^ Paul Jenkins, "Gators hire new women's tennis coach," The Gainesville Sun, pp. 1D & 4D (August 22, 1984). Retrieved June 16, 2011.

External links[edit]