List of missionaries to Hawaii

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Missionaries preaching under kukui groves, 1841

This is a list of missionaries to Hawaii. Before European exploration, the Hawaiian religion was brought from Tahiti by Paʻao according to oral tradition. Notable missionaries with written records below are generally Christian.

Protestant[edit]

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions[edit]

Several groups were sent from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.

First company[edit]

The first ABCFM company arrived on March 30, 1820 on the Thaddeus from Boston:[1][2]

Hiram Bingham I

Second company[edit]

The second ABCFM company arrived on April 23, 1823 on the Thames from New Haven:[4]

Third company[edit]

Lorrin Andrews

The third ABCFM company arrived on March 30, 1828 on the Parthian from Boston:[6]

Fourth company[edit]

The fourth ABCFM company arrived June 7, 1831 on the New England from New Bedford:[7]

Fifth company[edit]

Cochran Forbes

The fifth ABCFM company arrived May 17, 1832 on the Averick from Boston:[9]

Sixth company[edit]

The sixth ABCFM company arrived on May 1, 1833 on the Mentor:[10]

Seventh company[edit]

The seventh ABCFM company arrived on June 6, 1835 on the Hellespont:[11]

Eighth company[edit]

The eighth ABCFM company arrived on April 9, 1837 on the Mary Frasier from Boston:[13]

Ninth company[edit]

John D. Paris

The ninth ABCFM company arrived on May 21, 1841 on the Gloucester:[14]

Tenth company[edit]

The tenth ABCFM company arrived on September 24, 1842 on the Sarah Abagail from Boston:[15]

Arrived on October 19, 1842 on the Sarah Abagail from New York:[15]

Arrived on September 21, 1843 from Boston, originally intended on going to Oregon:[15]

Eleventh company[edit]

The eleventh ABCFM company arrived July 15, 1844 on the Globe from Boston:[16]

Twelfth company[edit]

The twelfth ABCFM company arrived February 26, 1848 on the Samoset from Boston:[17]

Other arrivals[edit]

Arrived in 1854, intended for Micronesia on the Chaica:[18]

London Missionary Society[edit]

From the London Missionary Society (deputation of British missionaries and Tahitian teachers on their way to theMarquesas), they arrive from Tabiti on April 16 and returned to Tahiti on August 27, 1822 on the Mermaid:[19]

  • Rev, Daniel Tyerman
  • Rev. George Bennet
  • Rev. William Ellis (1794–1872), who returned on February 4, 1823 on the Active, toured the islands, and published a book about the tour. He left after about eighteen months in the islands.[19][20]
  • Anna and Matatore, Tahitian chiefs and teacher, part of 1822 LMS brief stay
  • Taua and Tute, Tute, Tahitian teachers, part of 1823 LMS arrival

Anglican Church[edit]

  • Bishop Thomas Nettleship Staley (1823–1898), the first Anglican bishop, arrived in 1862.
  • Bishop Alfred Willis (1836–1920), the second Anglican bishop, arrived in 1872
  • Archdeacon George Mason, founder of ʻIolani School, part of the first Anglican mission under Bishop Staley
  • Rev. Edmund Ibbotson, founder of ʻIolani School, part of the first Anglican mission under Bishop Staley
  • Rev. William Richard Scott, founder of ʻIolani School (on Lahaina)
  • Rev. Joseph James Elkington
  • Rev. Alexander Mackintosh, Canon of the St. Andrew's and principal of the Royal School for many years.
  • Rev. Thomas Harris (1841–1907), Dean of Honolulu from 1868 to 1870.[21]

Other groups[edit]

From The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, arriving on December 12, 1850 on the Imaum of Muscat from San Francisco:[22]

  • Hiram Clark
  • Henry Bigler
  • Hiram Blackwell
  • George Q. Cannon
  • John Dixon
  • William Farrer
  • James Hawkins
  • James Keeler
  • Thomas Morris
  • Thomas Whittle

Methodist Episcopal Church

Hawaii Evangelical Association

  • John M. Lewis, Reverend of Wailuku Union Church from 1898-1900

Native Hawaiian Protestant[edit]

Native Hawaiian missionary family, c. 1878
  • David Malo (1793–1853), historian, built Kilolani Church
  • Henry ʻŌpūkahaʻia, who traveled via China to New England to inspire ACFM
  • James Kekela, first ordained Hawaiian Protestant minister
  • Bartimeus Lalana Puaʻaiki, first Hawaiian licensed to preach
  • Thomas Hopu, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the first ABCFM company
  • John Honolii, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the first ABCFM company
  • William Kanui, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the first ABCFM company
  • William Kamooula, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the second ABCFM company
  • Richard Kalaioulu, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the second ABCFM company
  • Kupelii, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the second ABCFM company
  • George Tyler Kielaa, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the third ABCFM company
  • Samuel J. Mills Paloo, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the third ABCFM company
  • John E. Phelps Kalaaauluna, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the third ABCFM company
  • Jonathan Napela, Uaua and Kaleohano, early Mormon convers, who would later serve as prominent missionaries and leaders in the LDS Church.[23]
  • William Hoapili Kaʻauwai (1835–1874), only Native Hawaiian to be ordained a priest of the Anglican Church of Hawaii in 1864

Tahitian Protestant[edit]

  • Stephen Popohe, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the second ABCFM company
  • Henry Tahiti, educated at Foreign Mission School and assisted the third ABCFM company
  • Tute Tehuiariʻi, accompanied Ellis of the London Missionary Society, chaplain to Hawaiian royalty and father of Manaiula Tehuiarii
  • Taua, accompanied Ellis of the London Missionary Society
  • Taʻamotu, female teacher, accompanied Ellis of the London Missionary Society
  • Toteta, Tahitian teacher
  • Auna, Tahitian teacher
  • Daniel Kahikona, Tahitian teacher

Roman Catholic[edit]

Episcopal arms of Bishop Rouchouze in a window at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace, Honolulu

Arrived in 1827 on La Comète from France on an invitation issued by Jean Baptiste Rives:

Subsequent bishops and priests:

Father Damien, SS.CC., in his later years, already afflicted with Hansen's disease

Also:

  • Mother Marianne Cope, O.S.F., (1838–1918), who led a group of Sisters from her religious congregation in answer to a plea by the King for nursing care of leprosy victims, and who eventually went to Molokai to help Father Damien in his last days and continue his work; beatified by the Catholic Church in 2005, canonized in October 2012
  • Brother Joseph Dutton (1843–1931), a lay brother who assisted in Father Damien's work and lived on Molokai from 1886 to his death.
  • Sister Leopoldina Burns (1855-1942), O.S.F., companion of Mother Marianne Cope in Molokai eho helped care for the lepers and served as educator for girls.

Hawaiian Catholics:

  • Helio Koaʻeloa (1815–1846), an early Catholic lay catechist known as the "Apostle of Maui".
  • Petero Mahoe, early Hawaiian catechist
  • Marie Leahi, early Hawaiian catechumen

Orthodox[edit]

  • Protopresbyter Jacob Korchinsky (1861–1941), founded the Russian Orthodox Mission in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1915. He was executed by Soviet authorities in August 1941. He is under consideration for sainthood in the Russian Orthodox Church.[24]
  • Archimandrite Innokenty Dronoff (+1930s to 1940s), served the Russian Orthodox Community in the Hawaiian Islands in the 1930s to 1940s. His final resting place is unknown. He was based primarily out of Hilo, Hawaii.[25]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 1.
  2. ^ Orramel Hinckley Gulick (1918). The pilgrims of Hawaii: their own story of their pilgrimage from New England. Fleming H. Revell company. pp. 341–347. ISBN 0-524-09143-9.
  3. ^ James R. Davis. "Hawaiian Missionaries". Rootsweb.Ancestry.com. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  4. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 11.
  5. ^ Stewart, Charles Samuel; Ellis, William (1828). Journal of a Residence in the Sandwich Islands, During the Years 1823, 1824, and 1825 (1st ed.). London: H. Fisher, Son, and P. Jackson.
  6. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 20.
  7. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 28.
  8. ^ Sheldon Dibble (1843). History of the Sandwich Islands. Lahainaluna: Press of the Mission Seminary.
  9. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 33.
  10. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 44.
  11. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 49.
  12. ^ Coan, Titus (1882). Life in Hawaii. New York: Anson Randolph & Company. ISBN 0-8370-6036-2.
  13. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 54.
  14. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 71.
  15. ^ a b c Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 76.
  16. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 81.
  17. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 86.
  18. ^ Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 93.
  19. ^ a b Hawaiian Mission Children's Society 1901, p. 9.
  20. ^ William Ellis (1823). "A journal of a tour around Hawai'i, the largest of the Sandwich Islands". Crocker and Brewster, New York, republished 2004, Mutual Publishing, Honolulu. ISBN 1-56647-605-4.
  21. ^ Pascoe, Charles Frederick (1894). Classified Digest of the Records of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 1701-1892. London: Published at the Society's Office. p. 908. OCLC 1618798.
  22. ^ Bureau of Information 1964, pp. 3.
  23. ^ LDS Church Almanac 2010 Edition, p. 331
  24. ^ "Fr. Jacob Korchinsky: Missionary and Martyr".
  25. ^ ""From Island to Island with the Word of God on His Lips" How the Only Orthodox Priest on the Islands Lives and Works".

References[edit]