List of places in the Godalming hundred

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Places in the ancient Godalming hundred of Surrey (with their probable meanings) include:

  • Alfold ("old enclosure")
  • Amberley (Imberlēah meaning "riverside clearing")
  • Artington (from heorotingdon meaning "hill of the people of the sacred hart"[1]
  • Bagmoor (possibly from the personal name Bacca + Moor, or perhaps meaning "badger's moor")
  • Binscombe (from possible Brythonic personal name Buden + Combe, meaning "Buden's Valley")
  • Brook (Brōc meaning "fast flowing stream" in Old English; cognate with Dutch broek, German bruch)
  • Busbridge (Bus + bridge, perhaps referring to the old bridge over the lake)
  • Catteshall (Gattes Hill meaning "gate or route to hill")
  • Chiddingfold (Chadingesfold meaning "enclosure of the people of the hollow")
  • Chinthurst (Chint + hurst, the second word means "wooded hill")
  • Compton (Probably a corruption of comb + tun meaning "valley estate")
  • Cosford (probably from "Cusa's Ford" but possibly from Welsh cors meaning bog, fen; hence "bog by the ford")
  • Culmer (Col mere meaning "cool or deep lake")
  • Cut Mill ("mill in the valley")
  • Dunsfold ("hilltop enclosure")
  • Eashing ("people of Essa")
  • Elstead (Ellested meaning "Place where the Elder trees grow")
  • Emley or Bowlhead Green (Eme lēah meaning "Ema's Clearing")
  • Enton (unknown, derived from En + tun, possibly "estate end")
  • Farncombe (Fernecome meaning "marshy valley")
  • Feathercombe (possibly meaning "wooded valley")
  • Frillinghurst ("the wooded hill of the people of the forest edge")
  • Godalming (Godhelm Ingas meaning "the people of Godhelm")
  • Grafham (Grafhæm meaning "farm by the grove")
  • Hambledon (Hameledūn probably meaning "flat-topped hill")
  • Hankley (Hank + lēah, meaning either "Hank's clearing" or possibly "dry clearing")
  • Hascombe (Hægtessecombe, meaning "valley of the witch")
  • Hurling (Hurlingas, meanin "Hurl's people"
  • Hurtmore (heorotmera, the second part means "hart (deer) lake")
  • Hurthill ("deer hill")
  • Hydestyle (unknown)
  • Hydon ("high hill")
  • Lascombe (the second part means "valley")
  • Littleton ("small estate")
  • Losley (Loselēah, the second part means "clearing")
  • Loxhill
  • Lydling ("little people")
  • Milford ("the ford by the mill")
  • Mousehill, Surrey (possibly literal, probably Middle English)
  • Munstead (possibly "Mun's place")
  • Northbourne ("north stream")
  • Nurscombe (Notescombe meaning "Note's valley"
  • Ockford (Hocford, "ford of the River Ock")
  • Ockley (Occalēah, "Occa's clearing")
  • Peper Harrow (Pīpereheōrge, "heathen temple of the Pipers")
  • Polsted (the second part means "place")
  • Prior's Field ("pasture of the Prior"
  • Puttenham (originally Reddesolhæm, the second part means "farm", the first part may be a given name.)
  • Rodborough, see also Rodborough School (unknown, but the second part refers to a burh which is a "fortified camp")
  • Rodsall (derived from the same name as Puttanham, above, Reddesolhæm)
  • Sandhills (possibly literal, probably Middle English)
  • Shackleford (Sakelesford, possibly derived from scacol meaning "tongue of land crossing")
  • Shackstead (Scuccastead, "evil spirit place")
  • Tadmoor (unknown, but some high ground)
  • Tilford "fertile river crossing"
  • Tiltham "fertile farm"
  • Thursley (Þunreslēah, "sacred clearing of Thunor"
  • Thorncombe Street "wild valley"
  • Truxford (unknown but a river crossing)
  • Tuesley (Tīweslēah, "sacred clearing of Tyr"
  • Unsted (see Munstead)
  • Winkford (unknown but a river crossing, perhaps with a given name)
  • Winkworth (the first part means "corner" or "nook", the second part means a "walled enclosure")
  • Witley (Witlēah, "white clearing" perhaps due to Silver Birch trees)
  • Wormley (Wormlēah, "clearing of snakes", perhaps due to many adders in the vicinity)
  • Yagden Hill (unknown, but the second part "den" is derived from dun meaning "hill")
  1. ^ [1]
  • Mills, Anthony David, A Dictionary of British Place-Names (2003), Oxford University Press

http://www.scribd.com/doc/49653561/3/Surrey http://www.localhistories.org/names.html