Maverickeye

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Maverickeye
Maverickeye
Public
IndustryCopyright
FoundedGermany, 2012
Headquarters
Stuttgart
,
Germany
Area served
United States of America
United Kingdom
Singapore
Denmark
ServicesCopyright infringement detection
Websitewww.maverickeye.de

Maverickeye UG (or Maverickeye) is a copyright enforcement company that is based in Germany. It detects and retraces copyright infringement using software technology.

Etymology[edit]

Maverickeye comes from two words: maverick which means “unorthodox or independent-minded” and eye. Combined, the whole name refers to the company’s unconventional way of detecting copyright violators.

Services[edit]

Maverickeye provides surveillance of intellectual property within various Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks such as BitTorrent and eMule. It makes use of hardware infrastructure to identify, analyse, archive, and document the illegal distribution of copyrighted materials. Maverickeye generates analytical, statistical, and graphical reports for P2P downloads of Internet users. They also offer takedown services requesting removal of unlicensed content from search engines and torrent sites. This service includes an analysis and trademark and picture infringement detection.

Takedown process[edit]

  1. Identify the sites that contain infringed content.
  2. Conduct human verification.
  3. Send takedown notices to suspected sites.
  4. Monitor the sites’ compliance.
  5. Manage documentation reports for clients.

Recent cases[edit]

United States of America

A lawsuit was directed at 11 users of the Popcorn Time software. Popcorn Time is a free alternative to subscription-based video streaming services such as Amazon Video and Netflix.

In September 2015, one of Maverickeye’s lawyers filed a lawsuit against 16 infringers using Maverickeye’s data to prove that infringers collaborated over Popcorn Time.

In Glacier Films v. Doe 3:15-cv-02016, the same partner lawyer was able to “see through dynamic IP addresses”. (Source: Rational Rights)

In total, Maverickeye was able to deliver data for over 200 federal cases and never lost one case.

United Kingdom

The company reached out to BAFTA, UK Film Council, Lord Lucas, Lord Clement-Jones, FACT and many others to explain and talk about the reduction of Internet copyright infringement by 30% in Germany. However, the idea of making the subscriber liable for infringements which has been adapted in other jurisdictions was met by disapproval by all of the politicians and government bodies who insisted that the DEA would solve all the problems.

After three years, Maverickeye finally received their first court order in the beginning of 2015 and sent out the first batch of letters in July 2015.

Singapore

Maverickeye identified more than 500 Singapore Internet Protocol (IP) addresses - of Singtel, StarHub and M1 Limited subscribers - at which the movie Dallas Buyers Club was allegedly downloaded.

Denmark

Dallas Buyers Club (DBC) also demanded fines for legal damages from Popcorn Time users in Denmark at the end of 2014. In summer this year, DBC’s copyright owner filed mass lawsuits against those who have allegedly downloaded the movie through BitTorrent.

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pearce, Rohan (25 February 2015). "iiDallas: Has the ISP copyright code failed before it has begun?". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  2. ^ Grubb, Ben (19 February 2015). "'These are not scare tactics': Dallas Buyers Club defends legal letters sent to alleged web pirates". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  3. ^ Taylor, Josh (17 February 2015). "iiNet throws doubt on Dallas Buyers Club piracy tracker". ZDNet. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  4. ^ Tham, Irene (8 April 2015). "US firm goes after illegal downloaders in S'pore". AsiaOne Digital. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  5. ^ Woolrych, Dominic (9 April 2015). "Illicit downloading: How the Dallas Buyers Club case will affect you". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  6. ^ Payne, Rob. "Dallas Buyers Club piracy raises tech questions". Science Network. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  7. ^ Coyne, Allie (6 May 2015). "Telcos ordered to pay Dallas Buyers Club's court costs". iTnews. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  8. ^ Pearce, Pearce (6 May 2015). "ISPs left with bill after Dallas Buyers Club court clash". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  9. ^ Pearce, Rohan (21 May 2015). "Gathering Dallas Buyers Club downloader details not cheap, say ISPs". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  10. ^ Andy. "ISP wants to understand technology used to track pirates". TorrentFreak. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  11. ^ Pearce, Rohan (19 June 2015). "Letter sets out Dallas Buyers Club demands". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  12. ^ Pearce, Rohan (22 April 2015). "Dallas Buyers Club and ISPs wrangle over costs". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  13. ^ Chappell, Bill (7 April 2015). "In movie piracy case, Australian ISPs are ordered to share customers' info". North Country Public Radio. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  14. ^ West, Michael (7 April 2015). "Does 'Dallas Buyers Club' ruling change the game for piracy?". ContactMusic.com. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  15. ^ "Dallas Buyers Club piraters face huge bills". Sky News. 7 April 2015. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  16. ^ Thomsen, Simon (7 April 2015). "Almost 5000 Australian 'movie pirates' are about to have their details handed to film makers". Business Insider. Australia. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  17. ^ Douglas, James Robert (9 March 2015). "Real Crimes in an unreal realm". The Monthly. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  18. ^ 15 September 2015, Ben (26 February 2015). "Judgment day looms for Australian web pirates". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  19. ^ Coyne, Allie (15 September 2015). "iiNet, DBC face three-week wait for piracy ruling". iTnews. Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  20. ^ Taylor, Josh (25 February 2015). "Dallas Buyers Club piracy judgment expected in three weeks". ZDNet. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  21. ^ Taylor, Josh (15 September 2015). "Three-strike piracy code draft targets residential internet users". ZDNet. Retrieved 20 February 2015.
  22. ^ Pearce, Rohan (17 February 2015). "Dallas Buyers Club rights holders won't wait for copyright code". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  23. ^ Coyne, Allie (17 February 2015). "iiNet attacks software used in Dallas Buyers Club piracy hunt". iTnews. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  24. ^ Reilly, Claire (17 February 2015). "iiNet challenges expert in Dallas Buyers Club case". CNET. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  25. ^ Pearce, Rohan (17 February 2015). "Dallas Buyers Club copyright stoush returns to court". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  26. ^ Taylor, Josh (17 February 2015). "iiNet challenges Dallas Buyers Club's expert witness". ZDNet. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  27. ^ Reilly, Claire (3 December 2014). "How Dallas Buyers Club is busting iiNet pirates". CNET. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  28. ^ Reilly, Claire (10 November 2014). "iiNet returns to court to fight calls for customer information". CNET. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  29. ^ Vatu, Gabriella (10 November 2014). "iiNet wants to know how Dallas Buyers Club LLC determined customers were pirating the movie". Softpedia. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  30. ^ Pearce, Rohan (10 November 2014). "iiNet seeks details of P2P monitoring system in piracy case". Computerworld. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  31. ^ Zaharov-Reutt, Alex (10 November 2014). "iiNet legal battles club: Acquired illegally downloaders syndrome?". iTWire. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  32. ^ Papadakis, Marianna; Ramli, David (10 November 2014). "February date set for iiNet's court battle over Dallas Buyers Club". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  33. ^ Coyne, Allie (10 November 2014). "iiNet seeks details of Dallas Buyers Clubs' piracy hunt". iTnews. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  34. ^ Ernesto (19 August 2015). "Movie studio sues Popcorn Time users in the U.S." TorrentFreak. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  35. ^ Andy (6 April 2015). "ISP Teksavvy appeals in Hurt Locker piracy case". TorrentFreak. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  36. ^ Tham, Irene (20 May 2015). "Dallas Buyers Club suit a legal minefield". The Straits Times. Retrieved 26 November 2015.
  37. ^ Healey, Nic (14 August 2015). "Judge says no to Dallas Buyers Club's 'surreal' overreach on piracy claims". CNET. Retrieved 26 November 2015.

External links[edit]