Milan metropolitan area

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Milan metropolitan area as seen from the International Space Station (North roughly on the top side)

The Milan metropolitan area, also known as Grande Milano ("Greater Milan"), is the largest metropolitan area in Italy and the 54th largest in the world. The metropolitan area descripted in this article is strictly statistical and, contrary to the administrative Metropolitan City of Milan, a provincial-level municipality, does not imply any kind of administrative unity or function.

Definition[edit]

Milan metropolitan area within northern Italy, as identified by OECD.

Given the absence of an official statistical definition for the metropolitan area of Milan, tracing precise boundaries is a somehow slippery issue. However, during the last decade, a number of studies have been carried out on the subject by some authoritative institutions and scholars, notably the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and numerous Italian sources that build a definition based on commuting fluxes and on the concentration of commercial, leisure and public utility services. A broad consensus exists upon a definition that includes the central Lombard provinces of Milan, Bergamo, Como, Lecco, Lodi, Monza and Brianza, Pavia, Varese and the Piedmontese Province of Novara, while some scholars include also the Province of Cremona and Brescia in Lombardy and the Emilian Province of Piacenza. The overall population under the narrowest definition is about 8.2 million over an area of about 13,000 km2 (5,000 sq mi).[1][2][3][4]

Provinces in the Milan metro area Area
(Sq.km.)
2001
Population[5]
2011
Population[5]
2017
Population[6]
 % change
(2011 to 2017)
Milan 1,575.65 2,938,556 3,038,420 3,218,201 +5.92%
Bergamo 2,745.94 973,559 1,086,277 1,109,933 +2.18%
Varese 1,198.11 812,934 871,886 890,043 +2.08%
Monza 405.41 766,767 840,129 868,859 +3.42%
Como 1,279.04 537,853 586,735 600,190 +2.29%
Pavia 2,968.64 493,829 535,822 547,251 +2.13%
Novara 1,340.28 343,097 365,559 370,143 +1.25%
Lecco 814.58 311,637 336,310 339,238 +0.87%
Lodi 782.99 198,020 223,755 229,338 +2.50%
Total 13,110.64 7,376,242 7,884,893 8,173,176 +3.66%

Largest cities[edit]

Milan
Monza
Bergamo
Novara

The following is a list of the twenty largest cities in the Milan metropolitan area as ranked by population.

Rank City Province 2001
population[5]
2011
population[5]
2017
population[6]
% change
(2011 to 2017)
1 Milan Milan 1,256,211 1,242,123 1,351,562 +8.81%
2 Monza Monza 120,104 119,856 122,955 +2.59%
3 Bergamo Bergamo 112,864 115,349 120,287 +4.28%
4 Novara Novara 100,939 101,952 104,165 +2.17%
5 Como Como 78,546 82,045 84,326 +2.78%
6 Busto Arsizio Varese 75,866 79,692 83,340 +4.58%
7 Sesto San Giovanni Milan 78,831 76,514 81,822 +6.94%
8 Varese Varese 80,492 79,793 80,694 +1.13%
9 Cinisello Balsamo Milan 71,924 71,128 75,659 +6.37%
10 Pavia Pavia 71,366 68,280 72,612 +6.34%
11 Vigevano Pavia 57,444 60,109 63,505 +5.65%
12 Legnano Milan 53,809 57,647 60,259 +4.53%
13 Gallarate Varese 46,461 50,456 53,145 +5.33%
14 Rho Milan 50,451 50,052 50,767 +1.43%
15 Lecco Lecco 45,513 46,705 48,131 +3.05%
16 Cologno Monzese Milan 48,270 45,786 47,751 +4.29%
17 Paderno Dugnano Milan 45,439 46,562 46,590 +0.06%
18 Lodi Lodi 40,894 43,332 45,212 +4.34%
19 Lissone Monza 34,482 42,220 45,233 +7.14%
20 Seregno Monza 39,171 43,001 44,962 +4.56%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "OECD Territorial Reviews: Milan, Italy" (PDF). OECD. Retrieved 13 October 2017. 
  2. ^ Campagna, Michele; et al. (2012). Planning Support Tools: Policy Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation. Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Informatics and Urban and Regional Planning INPUT2012. Milan: FrancoAngeli. pp. 1853–1856. ISBN 9788856875973. 
  3. ^ "Osservatorio sulla città metropolitana di Milano. Rapporto 2016" (PDF). Polytechnic University of Milan. Retrieved 13 October 2017. 
  4. ^ Salet, Willem; Thornley, Andy; Kreukels, Anton (2003). Metropolitan governance and spatial planning : comparative case studies of European city-regions. New York: Spon Press. p. 265. ISBN 978-0415274494. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Historical population, 1861-2014". Istat. Retrieved 14 October 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "Demographic balance, January-February 2017". Istat. Retrieved 14 October 2017.