New York County District Attorney

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District Attorney of New York County
District Attorney Vance at a June 2011 press conference
Incumbent
Cy Vance

since January 1, 2010
Website ManhattanDA.org

The New York County District Attorney is the elected district attorney for New York County (Manhattan), New York. The office is responsible for the prosecution of violations of New York state laws. (Federal law violations in Manhattan are prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York). The current district attorney is Cyrus Vance, Jr.

History[edit]

In the legislative act of February 12, 1796, New York State was divided into seven districts, each with an Assistant Attorney General, except New York County where Attorney General Josiah Ogden Hoffman prosecuted personally until 1801.[1]

From 1801 to 1813, New York County was part of the First District, which included the counties of New York, Kings, Queens, Richmond, and Suffolk. At that time, Queens included current-day Nassau County and Westchester included The Bronx. In 1813, Westchester County was apportioned to a new district with Rockland and Putnam counties, and in 1815, New York County became the Twelfth District - the only one at the time that was a single county. In 1818, each county in the state became its own district.

From 1874 to 1895, the New York County included the West Bronx, and from 1895 to 1913 it included all of what is now Bronx County, governing the same area as does the present Borough of the Bronx.[2] On January 1, 1914, the Bronx became a separate county with its own district attorney.

Until 1822, the district attorney was appointed by the Council of Appointment, and held the office "during the Council's pleasure", meaning that there was no defined term of office. Under the provisions of the New York State Constitution of 1821, the D.A. was appointed to a three-year term by the County Court, and under the provisions of the Constitution of 1846, the office became elective by popular ballot.[1] The term was three years, beginning on January 1 and ending on December 31. In case of a vacancy, an acting district attorney was appointed by the Court of General Sessions until the Governor of New York filled the vacancy with an interim appointment until an election was held for the remainder of the term.

The Consolidation Charter of 1896 extended the term of the incumbent John R. Fellows, who had been elected in 1893 to a three-year term (1894–1896) by a year. Since the City election of 1897, the D.A.'s term has coincided with the Mayor's term and has been four years long,[3] In case of a vacancy, the governor can still make an interim appointment until a special election is held for the remainder of the term.

District Attorneys[edit]

District Attorney Dates in office Party Notes
Richard Riker August 19, 1801 – February 13, 1810 Dem.-Rep.

[4]

Cadwallader D. Colden February 13, 1810 – February 19, 1811 Federalist

[4]

Richard Riker February 19, 1811 – March 5, 1813 Dem.-Rep.

[4]

Barent Gardenier March 5, 1813 – March 31, 1815 Federalist

[4]

John Rodman March 31, 1815 – January 28, 1817 Dem.-Rep.

[5]

Hugh Maxwell January 28, 1817 – June 11, 1818 Dem.-Rep.

[5]

Pierre C. Van Wyck June 11, 1818 – February 13, 1821 Dem.-Rep.

[6]

Hugh Maxwell February 13, 1821 – May 1829 Dem.-Rep.
Ogden Hoffman May 1829 – May 22, 1835 Democratic
  • appointed to two three-year terms[6]
Thomas Phoenix May 22, 1835 – June 4, 1838
  • appointed to a three-year term[6]
James R. Whiting June 4, 1838 – June 10, 1844 Democratic
  • appointed to two three-year terms[6]
Matthew C. Paterson June 10, 1844 – January 26, 1846
  • appointed to a three-year term[6]
  • died in office[6]
John McKeon[7] February 6, 1846 – December 31, 1850 Democratic
N. Bowditch Blunt[8] January 1, 1851 – July 17, 1854 Whig
  • elected to two three-year terms[6][9]
  • died in office[8]
Lorenzo B. Shepard[10] July 25, 1854 – December 31, 1854 (interim) Democratic
A. Oakey Hall[12] January 1, 1855 – December 31, 1857 Whig
  • elected to a three-year term[6][13]
  • did not run for re-election[14]
Peter B. Sweeny[15] January 1, 1858 – October 3, 1858 Democratic
  • elected to a three-year term[6][14][16]
  • resigned because of ill health[17]
Joseph Blunt[18] October 5, 1858 – December 31, 1858 (interim) Republican
Nelson J. Waterbury[20] January 1, 1859 – December 31, 1861 Democratic
  • elected to a three-year term[6][21]
  • lost election to Hall[22]
A. Oakey Hall January 1, 1862 – December 31, 1868 Republican
Samuel B. Garvin[28] January 5, 1869 – December 31, 1869 (acting)
January 1, 1870 – December 31, 1872
Democratic
Benjamin K. Phelps[30] January 1, 1873 – December 30, 1880 Republican
Daniel G. Rollins[35] January 3, 1881 – January 10, 1881 (acting)
January 10, 1881 – December 31, 1881 (interim)
Republican
  • appointed acting D.A. by the Court of General Sessions,[6][36] then appointed interim D.A. for the remainder of Phelps' term by Governor Alonzo B. Cornell[37]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Surrogate instead, and won)[38]
John McKeon January 1, 1882 – November 22, 1883 Democratic
John Vincent November 22, 1883 – November 30, 1883 (acting) Democratic
  • appointed by the Court of General Sessions to act until the governor's appointment of a successor[6][7][40]
Wheeler H. Peckham[41] November 30, 1883 – December 9, 1883 (interim) Democratic
Peter B. Olney[43] December 10, 1883 – December 31, 1884 (interim) Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Cleveland[6][42]
  • did not run for election
Randolph B. Martine[44] January 1, 1885 – December 31, 1887 Democratic
  • elected to a three-year term[6][45][46]
  • did not run for re-election, became a judge in the Court of General Sessions[47][48]
John R. Fellows[49] January 1, 1888 – December 31, 1890 Democratic
  • elected to a three-year term[6][48][50]
  • did not run for re-election (ran for Congress instead, and won)[51]
De Lancey Nicoll[52] January 1, 1891 – December 31, 1893 Democratic
  • elected to a three-year term[51]
  • did not seek renomination[53]
John R. Fellows January 1, 1894 – December 7, 1896 Democratic
  • second tenure, elected to a three-year term that was extended by one year so that the D.A., the Mayor, and other city officers would be elected in the same years[54]
  • died in office shortly before the extra year began[49]
Vernon M. Davis[55] December 7, 1896 – December 19, 1896 (acting) Democratic
  • appointed by the Court of General Sessions to act until the appointment of a successor by the Governor[56]
William M.K. Olcott[57] December 19, 1896 – December 31, 1897 (interim) Republican
Asa Bird Gardiner[59] January 1, 1898 – December 22, 1900 Democratic
Eugene A. Philbin[62] December 22, 1900 – December 31, 1901 (interim) Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Roosevelt[61]
George W. Schurman[63] January 1, 1902 (acting) Republican
  • appointed by Mayor Low until Jerome was sworn in[64][65]
William T. Jerome[66] January 2, 1902 – December 31, 1909 Fusion/Ind.
  • elected on a Fusion ticket nominated by Anti-Tammany Democrats, Republicans and Citizens Union[67][68]
  • re-elected in 1905 as an Independent, was also nominated by the Republican Party too late to appear on the ballot[69]
  • not re-nominated for re-election[70]
Charles S. Whitman[71] January 1, 1910 – December 31, 1914 Republican
Charles A. Perkins[75] January 1, 1915 – December 31, 1915 (interim) Republican
  • appointed by Whitman, his predecessor as D.A., who became Governor[74]
  • defeated by Swann in a special election[76]
Edward Swann[77] January 1, 1916 – December 31, 1921 Democratic
  • elected to the remainder of Whitman's second term[76]
  • re-elected to a four-year term[78]
  • did not seek re-nomination
Joab H. Banton[79] January 1, 1922 – December 31, 1929 Democratic
  • elected to two four-year terms[80][81]
  • did not see renomination[82]
Thomas C. T. Crain[83] January 1, 1930 – December 31, 1933 Democratic
William C. Dodge January 1, 1934 – December 31, 1937 Democratic
  • Elected to a four-year term[86]
Thomas E. Dewey[87] January 1, 1938 – December 31, 1941 Republican,
American Labor,
City Fusion
  • Elected to a four-year term
Frank S. Hogan[88] January 1, 1942 – February 5, 1974 Democratic
  • Elected to nine four-year terms
  • Tendered resignation on December 26, 1973, but remained in office until Kuh was appointed, shortly after beginning his ninth term
Richard Kuh[89] February 5, 1974 – December 31, 1974 (interim) Democratic
  • Appointed by Governor Malcolm Wilson for the remainder of the year
  • Defeated by Morgenthau in Democratic primary for the special election for the remainder of Hogan's term
Robert M. Morgenthau January 1, 1975 – December 31, 2009 Democratic
  • Won a special election for the remainder of Hogan's ninth term
  • Re-elected to eight four-year terms
Cyrus Vance, Jr. January 1, 2010 – incumbent Democratic
  • elected to two four-year terms

In popular culture[edit]

The long-running television series Law & Order and its spin-offs depict the prosecution of criminal suspects by lawyers of the New York County District Attorney's office. The fictional district attorneys depicted in the franchise are Adam Schiff, Nora Lewin, Arthur Branch and Jack McCoy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chester, Alden; Weeks, Lyman Horace; Dougherty, John Hampden (1911). Legal and Judicial History of New York. National Americana Society. 
  2. ^ Geoffrey Hermalyn and Lloyd Ultan, "Bronx" in The Encyclopedia of New York City (1st edition), edited by Kenneth T. Jackson, New York Historical Society and Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995, ISBN 0-300-05536-6, page 140.
  3. ^ except from 1901 to 1905, when the D.A.'s term was four years and two mayors each served a two-year term.
  4. ^ a b c d Werner, Edgar A. (1891). Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, Parsons, and Company. pp. 553–563. Retrieved 22 October 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Werner (1891), p. 554. Retrieved 22 October 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Werner (1891), p. 558. Retrieved 22 October 2016.
  7. ^ a b c "John M'Keon's Work Done — Sudden Close of a Long and Active Life — Dying Yesterday After a Successful Career As a Lawyer, Legislator, and Criminal Prosecutor". New York Times. November 23, 1883. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Death of N.B. Blunt, Esq.". New York Times. July 18, 1854. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  9. ^ "New-York State Election — Additional Returns State Ticket — City Vote". The New York Times. November 10, 1853. p. 8. Retrieved 28 November 2016. 
  10. ^ "Sudden Death of Lorenzo B. Shepard". New York Times. September 20, 1856. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  11. ^ "New-York City — City Politics — Soft-Shell Judiciary Convention". New York Times. October 12, 1854. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "A. Oakey Hall is Dead — The Lawyer, Writer, Politician, and ex-Mayor a Victim of Heart Disease — The Man's Remarkable Life — Poverty-Stricken in Youth, He Worked His Way Through College and Climbed Steadily to the Top — Some of His Peculiarities". New York Times. October 8, 1898. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  13. ^ "Official Canvass". New York Times. December 5, 1854. p. 6. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  14. ^ a b "Votes for City Officers at the November Election — Official". New York Times. November 21, 1857. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  15. ^ "Peter B. Sweeny Dead at 86 — One of "Big Four" of Tweed Ring Spent His Last Years In New York". New York Times. September 1, 1911. p. 7. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  16. ^ "Court of General Sessions". New York Times. January 4, 1858. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  17. ^ "Resignation of P.B. Sweeney". New York Times. October 4, 1858. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  18. ^ "Death of Geo. W. Blunt — His Career as a Public Officer — Brief Sketch of His Life — Over Thirty-Two Years in the Public Service — The Positions Which He Held — The Blunt Family As Writers on Nautical Subjects". New York Times. April 20, 1878. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  19. ^ "News of the Day". New York Times. October 6, 1858. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  20. ^ "Ex-Judge Nelson J. Waterbury Dead — Succumbs to Pneumonia After Three Days, Illness — His Long Career". New York Times. April 23, 1894. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  21. ^ "Law Reports — Court of General Sessions for January". New York Times. January 3, 1859. p. 3. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  22. ^ a b "Vote for Canal Commissioner — Votes for Assemblymen and Senators". New York Times. November 7, 1861. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  23. ^ "The State Elections — New-York — The Legislature — Members of Assembly Elected — The Election in the City". The New York Times. November 7, 1861. Retrieved 29 November 2016. 
  24. ^ "Glorious Result Yesterday — Election of Lincoln and Johnson — Terrible Defeat of McClellan — The Union Triumphant — New-England a Solid Phalanx — New-York for Lincoln and Fenton — Defeat of Governor Seymour and His Friends — Gain of Five Union Congressmen in the State — Election of Raymond, Dodge, Darling, Conklin and Humphrey — Pennsylvania Union on the Home Vote — Heavy Union Gains — Maryland and Delaware All Right — Heavy Union Gains in New-Jersey — The Great Northwest Solid for Lincoln — Details of the Returns — The Vote of the City — President and Governor — Canal Commissioner — State Prison Inspector — Fourth Congressional District — Fifth Congressional District — Sixth Congressional District — Seventh Congressional District — Eighth Congressional District — Ninth Congressional District — The Total Vote and the Registry". New York Times. November 9, 1864. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  25. ^ "Local Intelligence — The Recent Elections in the City — Corrected Vote by Wards". New York Times. November 10, 1867. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  26. ^ "The Charter Election — The Tammany Nominees Elected by Large Majorities — A. Oakey Hall Mayor Elect — Richard O'Gorman Corporation Counsel — Tabular Statement of Voting — Arrests of Illegal Voters". New York Times. December 2, 1898. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  27. ^ "Municipal Affairs — Organization of the Common Council — The Mayor's Message — The City Budget for 1869 — Comparison of Taxation in 1868 and 1869". New York Times. January 5, 1869. p. 2. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  28. ^ "Obituary — Samuel B. Garvin". New York Times. June 29, 1878. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  29. ^ "Law Reports — The Law Courts for January". New York Times. January 4, 1869. p. 2. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  30. ^ a b "A Bright Career Ended — Death of District Attorney Benjamin K. Phelps — Brief Sketch of His Life and Legal Work — A Leading Lawyer and a Successful Prosecutor — His Last Illness". New York Times. December 31, 1880. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  31. ^ "New-York — Official Vote for President and Governor". New York Times. November 22, 1872. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  32. ^ "The New Year — How the Social Holiday will be Celebrated — Prospect of a Fine Day — New-Year's Calls — The Customs of the Day — Official Receptions — Work of the Old Year — Decapitations and Appointments in Municipal Departments". New York Times. January 1, 1873. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  33. ^ "The People's Victory — The Vote in the City — A Democratic Majority of 28,156 For Secretary of State, Against 42,528 For Tilden Last Year — The Vote For District Attorney and Recorder". New York Times. November 4, 1875. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  34. ^ "One-Man Power Crushed — An Overwhelming Victory For the People — Edward Cooper Elected Mayor by a Majority of Nearly 20,000 — John Kelly Defeated at Every Point — The People Rise in Their Might Against Tammany Hall — Good Municipal Government Assured". New York Times. November 6, 1878. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  35. ^ "Daniel G. Rollins Dead — The Former Surrogate Passes Away at His Summer Home in Somersworth, N.H. — His Career As a Laweyr — Served as Assistant United States District Attorney and County District Attorney in This City, and Had a Wide Acquaintance at the Bar". New York Times. August 31, 1897. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  36. ^ "Mr. Phelps's Successor — His Assistant, Mr. Rollins, Appointed Temporarily". New York Times. January 4, 1881. p. 9. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  37. ^ "Mr. Phelps's Successor — Daniel G. Rollins Appointed District Attorney by the Governor". New York Times. January 11, 1881. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  38. ^ a b "A Republican Majority — The State Ticket Elected On a Close Vote". New York Times. November 9, 1891. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  39. ^ "The New District Attorney — Mr. M'Keon Assumes Office and Visits the Toms". New York Times. January 3, 1882. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  40. ^ "Mr. M'Keon's Successor". New York Times. November 23, 1883. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  41. ^ Patterson, Edward (1906). Memorial of Wheeler Hazard Peckham. New York, N.Y.: Association of the Bar of the City of New York. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  42. ^ a b "Wheeler H. Peckham Resigns — Ill Health Causes Him to Give Place to Peter B. Olney as District Attorney". New York Times. December 11, 1883. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  43. ^ "Peter Butler Olney Dies of Pneumonia — Ex-District Attorney Succumbs Suddenly at His Cedarhurst Home at 78 Years — Sued "Boss" Tweed Ring — Brother of Late Secretary of State Helped Revise the Laws Affecting New York City". New York Times. February 10, 1922. p. 15. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  44. ^ "Death of Judge Martine — Heart Failure, Due to Peritonitis, the Cause — His Recovery Was Hoped For — Preparations Had Been Made to Take Him to Old Point Comfort — Action of General Sessions Judges". New York Times. March 31, 1895. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  45. ^ "Official Vote of the County — Most of the Cleveland Electors Have a Plurality of 43,130". New York Times. November 20, 1884. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  46. ^ "Mr. Martine Begins Work". New York Times. January 2, 1885. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  47. ^ "Shall The People Be Beaten?". New York Times. October 23, 1887. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  48. ^ a b "Col. Fellows in Office — A Day of Congratulations and Hospitality". New York Times. January 3, 1888. p. 8. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  49. ^ a b "Col. John R. Fellows — Dead The District Attorney Passed Away Yesterday — His Older Son Reached Home Too Late to See His Father in Life — Sketch of Col. Fellows's Career". The New York Times. December 8, 1896. p. 8. Retrieved 30 November 2016. 
  50. ^ "Result of the City Vote — It Proves to Be a Sweeping Democratic Victory — The Labor Vote Broken Up in an Unexpected Way — Candidates Who Are Elected to Office". New York Times. November 9, 1887. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  51. ^ a b "Result of the City Vote — The Tammany Ticket Elected in Its Entirety — Pluralities Given for the Candidates Ranging From About Ten Thousand to Nearly Twenty-Five Thousand". New York Times. November 5, 1890. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  52. ^ "De Lancey Nicoll, Noted Lawyer, Dies — Former District Attorney Is Stricken Suddenly in His 77th Year — "Boodle Aldermen's" Foe — Convicted Several for Accepting Franchise Bribes — Delegate to Constitutional Conclaves". New York Times. April 1, 1931. p. 24. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  53. ^ "Nicoll Out of the Race — The District Attorney Will Not take a Renomination — He Makes This Announcement After a Talk with Mr. Croker — Says He Was Urged to Run Again, but He Decided to Give up Politics — Gossip About the Tammany Nominations That Will Be Made at the Convention To-night — Republican Hopes". New York Times. October 7, 1893. p. 5. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  54. ^ "Tammany Sweeps the City — Very Little Interest Over the Local Ticket — As the Day Was Fine, However, the Respectable Element Went to the Polls in Larger Numbers Than Usual — Many Workmen Did Not Take the Customary "Day Off," Evidently Caring Little How the Election Resulted — Disturbances Were Few and Trifling". New York Times. November 8, 1893. p. 6. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  55. ^ "Ex-Justice Davis Dies of Pneumonia — Eminent Jurist, Who Lately Had Acted as Official Referee, Was 76 Years Old — Noted Episcopal Layman — He Won National Fame as District Attorney — Led in Welfare and Educational Activities". New York Times. April 18, 1931. p. 19. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  56. ^ "Favor Vernon M. Davis — Indorsed by Business Men as Col. Fellows's Successor". The New York Times. December 12, 1896. p. 7. Retrieved 30 November 2016. 
  57. ^ "W.M.K. Olcott, Ex-Judge, Dead — Served as District Attorney of New York County Many Years Ago — Once City Court Judge — Prominent Member of the Bar — Ardent Republican, He Entered Politics Early in Career". New York Times. May 11, 1933. p. 16. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  58. ^ "Olcott Takes His Office — New District Attorney Sworn In by Justice Pryor — Immediately Reappoints Several Assistant District Attorneys and Announces His Policy for Future Distribution of Patronage". The New York Times. December 20, 1896. p. 9. Retrieved 30 November 2016. 
  59. ^ "Gen. Asa B. Gardiner Dies in 80th Year — Ex-District Attorney of New York and Military Leader Passes at His Suffern Home — Was Counsel for Grant — Awarded Congressional Medal for Bravery, He Was Asked 45 Years Later to Return It". New York Times. May 29, 1919. p. 11. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  60. ^ "Democrats Take All — The Tammany Ticket Makes Almost a Clean Sweep of the Greater City — Only Two Republicans in the Council — Van Wyck's Plurality Is 80,316 — Seth Low Ran Nearly 40,000 Ahead of His Ticket — The Republicans Lose 21 Assemblymen and Elect Only 11 Candidates to the Board of Aldermen". New York Times. November 4, 1897. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  61. ^ a b "Col. Gardiner is Removed — Governor Ousts the District Attorney — Sustains the Charges — Appoints Eugene A. Philbin, a Democrat to the Office — Decision Based Principally Upon the Conduct of the District Attorney at the Time of the Devery Indictment". New York Times. December 23, 1900. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  62. ^ "Judge Philbin Dies; His Illess Brief — End Comes at His City Home After Being Stricken with Pneumonia Tuesday — Was Born Here in 1857 — Justice's Life Marked by Public Service, Especially in Protecting Parks". New York Times. March 15, 1920. p. 15. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  63. ^ "G.W. Schurman Dies; Prominent Lawyer — Was Once Associated With Chief Justice Hughes in Legal Practice Here — Leader in Bar Association — Brother of Ex-Envoy to Germany Had Been Active Aide in Jerome Reform Movement". The New York Times. January 10, 1931. p. 15. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  64. ^ "Mr. Schurman Will Act — To Be District Attorney from Midnight Until Justice Jerome Is Sworn In". The New York Times. December 31, 1901. p. 14. Retrieved 21 October 2016. 
  65. ^ "Mr. Jerome Was Not Sworn In — New York Without an Official District Attorney Yesterday — Justices of the Supreme Court Had All Gone Home When He Was Ready to Take the Oath". The New York Times. January 2, 1902. p. 2. Retrieved 21 October 2016. 
  66. ^ "Jerome Dies at 74; Long Tammany Foe — District Attorney Whose Raids Roused the City 30 Years Ago Succumbs to Pneumonia — Led Reform Movements — But Was Not 'Reformer' Type — Closed Canfield Resort and Prosecuted Thaw". The New York Times. February 14, 1934. p. 19. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  67. ^ "Victory for the Fusion Ticket — Seth Low Elected Mayor by About 33,000 Plurality — Jerome Defeats Unger — Fusion Borough Presidents Chosen in Three Boroughs — Van Wyck Left Far Behind — Contest Close for Sheriff in This County — Jerome Wins by About 15,000 — Fusion Justices Win — Democrats Carry Only Queens and Bronx". The New York Times. November 6, 1901. p. 1. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  68. ^ "Mr. Jerome Takes The Oath of Office — Justice Leventritt Swears In the District Attorney — Police Cases to Receive Immediate and Close Attention — To Bring Offenders to Justice Within Short Space of Time". The New York Times. January 3, 1902. p. 14. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  69. ^ "Jerome — Elected District Attorney by 3,525 — In Doubt Till Late — Result Greeted with Wild Cheering by the Crowds — Jerome Says the People Did It". The New York Times. November 8, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  70. ^ "Name Whitman for District Attorney — Republicans Select a Full County Ticket in Accordance with Fusion Agreement — Shea Chosen for Sheriff — Two Republicans and an Independent Democrat Nominated for the Supreme Bench". The New York Times. September 30, 1909. p. 1. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  71. ^ "Ex-Gov. Whitman Dies Here at 78 — Executive of State, 1915-18, 'Broke' Rosenthal Case as District Attorney in 1912". The New York Times. March 30, 1947. p. 1. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  72. ^ "Gaynor Wins; Tammany Loses All The Rest — A Clean Sweep by Fusion of All Offices Outside of the Mayoralty — Gaynor's Plurality 72,500 — But Fusion Has Carried the Board of Estimate and with It City Control — Whitman District Attorney — Beats George Gordon Battle for the Office by About 22,000 Votes — All Patronage to Fusion — Controllership, Aldermanic Presidency, County Offices, and Supreme Court — All Gone — Borough Presidents, Too — McAneny Wins in Manhattan, Gresser Carries Queens, Miller the Bronx — And Roesch Is Beaten". The New York Times. November 3, 1909. p. 3. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  73. ^ Manual for the Use of the Legislature of the State of New York — 1914. Albany, N.Y.: J.B. Lyon. 1914. p. 665. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  74. ^ a b "Whitman Goes in As Bells Toll 12 — New Governor Takes Up Reins of Office at Midnight Without Waiting for Ceremonial — Legal Point is Involved — Courts Advise Him to Re-designate Justices Whose Terms Expired with 1914 — Accepts Own Resignation — First Official Act Is Followed by Appointment of Charles Albert Perkins as District Attorney". The New York Times. January 1, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  75. ^ "Charles A. Perkins, Ex-Prosecutor, Dies — Served as District Attorney of New York County When Mitchel Was Mayor — Handled City Trust Cases — Took Part In the Lexow Investigation — Made a Drive Against Notorious Gangsters". The New York Times. January 17, 1930. p. 23. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  76. ^ a b "Swann, District Attorney — His Plurality 33,589, and Smith Elected Sheriff by 49,390 — Bennet Back to Congress — Has Probably Carried His Uptown District by About 723 Over Healey — Cropsey Wins in Brooklyn — Tammany Will Probably Control Board of Aldermen and Elect McAneny's Successor". The New York Times. November 3, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  77. ^ "Edward Swann, 83, Ex-Judge, Is Dead — District Attorney Here, '16-22, Was Often Under Fire — 9 Years in General Sessions". The New York Times. Associated Press. September 21, 1945. p. 21. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  78. ^ "Hylan Chosen Mayor, Plurality 147,000; Woman Suffrage Wins Probably by 80,000; Prohibition Close, Suffrage Loses, in Ohio — A Tammany Sweep — Hylan Can Get Every Vote in the Board of Estimate — Carries Every Borough — His Vote Is 293,382, Mitchel's 148,060, and Hillquit's 138,793 — Lewis, Attorney General — Beaten in This City, but Had a Big Plurality Up-State — Hylan Promises Loyalty". The New York Times. November 7, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  79. ^ "Joab Banton, 79, Once Prosecutor — District Attorney of New York in 1922-29 Dies — Handled Rothstein Murder Case". The New York Times. July 21, 1949. p. 25. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  80. ^ "The City Vote — Hylan's Plurality 417,986 — Craig's 249,252 — Banton's 83,680.". The New York Times. November 10, 1921. p. 4. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  81. ^ "Final Returns Add to Tammany Sweep — All but Three of 63 Candidates for Aldermen, and 56 for Assembly Are Elected — Walker Wins by 401,581 — Banton's Plurality 105,421 — Wigwam Captures 10th District — Connolly Issues Statement". The New York Times. November 5, 1925. p. 2. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  82. ^ "City Tickets Named; Republican Leaders Pick Aron and Coler — Selections in LaGuardia Slate, With Banker for Controller, Provide a Surprise — Democrats Redesignated — Walker, Berry and McKee Are Chosen for Present Offices, With All Chiefs Concurring — Hylan Still in the Race — Dry Republicans Urge Bennett, Who Once Beat Mitchel in Primary, to Fight LaGuardia". The New York Times. August 8, 1929. p. 1. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  83. ^ "Thomas C.T. Crain, Ex-Justice, Dies, 82 — Tammany Sachem Who Won District Attorneyship at 69 — A Court Referee at Death — Rothstein Murder One of Cases Investigated by Him — Was of Mayflower Ancestry". The New York Times. May 30, 1942. p. 15. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  84. ^ "Crain is Elected by 96,863 Margin — Tammany Candidate Leading With 202,574 Against 106,095, With 72 Districts Missing". The New York Times. November 6, 1929. p. 5. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  85. ^ "District Attorneys Elect and Some of the Victorious Judicial Candidates". The New York Times. November 6, 1929. p. 3. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  86. ^ "Officials Elected". The New York Times. November 8, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  87. ^ "Thomas E. Dewey Is Dead at 68". The New York Times. March 17, 1971. p. 1. Retrieved 20 August 2016. 
  88. ^ "Hogan, District Attorney 32 Years, Dies". New York Times. April 3, 1974. p. 1. Retrieved 29 November 2013. Frank S. Hogan, the shy, courteous lawyer who became a legend in 32 years as Manhattan's District Attorney, died yesterday at St. Luke's Hospital. Mr. Hogan was 72 years old and lived at 404 Riverside Drive. 
  89. ^ Saxon, Wolfgang; Vitello, Paul (November 19, 2011). "Richard H. Kuh, Ex-Manhattan Prosecutor, Dies at 90". The New York Times. p. D8. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 

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