Ornate eagle ray

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Ornate eagle ray
Ornate eagle ray (Aetomylaeus vespertilio) Baa Atoll, Maldives (2018).jpg
Photo of a rarely seen Ornate eagle ray (Aetomylaeus vespertilio), taken at Landaa Giraavaru, Baa Atoll, Maldives (February 2018).
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Chondrichthyes
Order: Myliobatiformes
Family: Myliobatidae
Genus: Aetomylaeus
Species: A. vespertilio
Binomial name
Aetomylaeus vespertilio
(Bleeker, 1852)

The ornate eagle ray or reticulate eagle ray (Aetomylaeus vespertilio) is a species of large stingray of the Myliobatidae family.

Appearance[edit]

Aetomylaeus vespertilio has a maximum size of around 240 cm in disc width and a clearly distinct pattern of reticulate dark lines and rings on its back. If the extremely long tail is unbroken, it can considerably add to the maximum body length of 4m. They are estimated to have a low fecundity similar to other myliobatids. They have a generation length of 15 years, and can grow as old as 24 years. Lacking spine on the tail, it is deemed harmless to humans.

Distribution[edit]

Aetomylaeus vespertilio can be spotted up to 110 meters deep along the coasts of Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mozambique, Philippines, Taiwan, Province of China, and Thailand. Despite the wide range it can be spotted at, it is rarely observed, and has been suspected to have had a large population decline within the past three generations. Currently, this species is considered endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature(IUCN).

Aetomylaeus vespertilio are estimated to have a low fecundity similar to other myliobatids. They have a generation length of 15 years, and can grow as old as 24 years.

Threats[edit]

Although Aetomylaeus vespertilio was once common, they are now considered rare in areas such as the Gulf of Thailand. The largest threats they encounter are demersal fisheries, which are used frequently in the areas they live in. When caught, they are mostly retained and sold in fish markets. No species-specific conservation measures have taken place.

Sources[edit]

  • White, W.T. & Kyne, P.M. 2016. Aetomylaeus vespertilio. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T60121A68607665. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T60121A68607665.en. Downloaded on 16 February 2018.
  • Debelius, H. 2006, "Indian Ocean Reef Guide" ISBN 978-3931702670
  • Australian museum [1]

External links[edit]